2

I have this struct:

#[deriving(Clone)]
pub struct MiddlewareStack {
    handlers: Vec<Box<Middleware + Send>>
}

Then I have code to add a handler to handlers

pub fn utilize<T: Middleware>(&mut self, handler: T){
    self.middleware_stack.add(handler);
}

This works fine but I wonder, why does that have to use generics at all?

So I tried this:

pub fn utilize(&mut self, handler: Middleware){
    self.middleware_stack.add(handler);
}

But this leaves me with this error:

error: reference to trait `Middleware` where a type is expected; try `Box<Middleware>` or `&Middleware`
       pub fn utilize(&mut self, handler: Middleware){

Ok, then. Traits can't be used directly as parameters (because they get erased?). But then why are they legal as generic type parameter?

So, I went on and tried:

pub fn utilize(&mut self, handler: Box<Middleware + Send>){
    self.middleware_stack.add(handler);
}

But that leaves me with the following error:

error: failed to find an implementation of trait middleware::Middleware for Box<middleware::Middleware:Send>
       self.middleware_stack.add(handler);

So, I wonder: does that code really have to use generics? Not, that there is a particular reason why I don't want it not to use generics. It's more that I want to understand why it has to use generics because coming from languages such as C# of Java it could just be a non generic method that uses an interface as a parameter which should roughly translate into a trait in Rust.

A follow up to Vladimirs excellent answer

you're trying to pass a trait object inside this function. But trait objects do not implement corresponding traits, that is, their types do not satisfy their respective trait bounds unless these traits are explicitly implemented on them

I think, this was the weird part for me. I expected to be able call self.middleware_stack.add(handler) with a boxed Middleware given that add looks like this:

pub fn add<T: Middleware> (&mut self, handler: T) {
    self.handlers.push(box handler);
}

But ok the :Middleware bound is not satisfied with a Box<Middleware> and on a second thought this actually makes sense. Otherwise I would end up with double boxing in the above code anyway.

If I change utilize to:

pub fn utilize(&mut self, handler: Box<Middleware + Send>){
    self.middleware_stack.add(handler);
}

and add to

pub fn add (&mut self, handler: Box<Middleware+Send>) {
    self.handlers.push(handler);
}

It works as expected. Notice, that they are not in the same module, hence the encapsulation. But it implies that on the caller site I have to change the code to utilize(box some_middleware).

With the generic implementation I was able to call box on the very bottom of my layers that is

pub fn add<T: Middleware> (&mut self, handler: T) {
    self.handlers.push(box handler);
}

But with the non-generic implementation I have to box on the callers site because otherwise I would run into:

error: reference to trait `Middleware` where a type is expected; try `Box<Middleware>` or `&Middleware`

Let's face it: I can never have Middleware as a simple parameter. I would always need either Box<Middleware> or &Middleware which implies that I have to do the boxing early in the process whereas with generics I can do the boxing some way down the road.

I think I don't fully grasp yet why exactly that is the case. Because if the compiler translates

pub fn add<T: Middleware> (&mut self, handler: T) {
    self.handlers.push(box handler);
}

into:

pub fn add (&mut self, handler: Middleware) {
    self.handlers.push(box handler);
}

at some point anyway.

Why am I not allowed to use the unboxed version of Middleware as a simple parameter if that's more or less what the compiler will do behind the scenes anyway?

5

Rust currently provides two ways of writing polymorphic code: generics and trait objects.

Generics are present in the form of type parameters. That is, a function has additional parameters which are chosen by the caller. The compiler then generates corresponding monomorphic version of the function where all type parameters are replaced with concrete types:

fn add<T: Add<T, Output=T>>(a: T, b: T) -> T {
    a + b
}

// when used like this:
let (a, b) = (1, 2);
let c = add(a, b);

// roughly the following code will be generated:
fn add(a: i32, b: i32) -> i32 {
    a + b
}

You see, this is very efficient: monomorphization leads to the fastest possible code which does not rely on any kind of indirection. At any point of time the compiler knows which functions should be called and exactly which types are used.

Trait objects, on the other hand, allow to "erase" actual type of the given piece of data, leaving only a list of traits this piece of data implements. Because the compiler does not know the actual type used, it does not know its size which is needed to generate code working with objects of that type, so trait objects should always be accessed through some pointer. Trait objects are usually used when you need some heterogeneous collection, e.g. a vector which can contain items of different types, provided they all have the same set of traits:

fn show_all(v: &[&Display]) {
    for (i, item) in v.iter().enumerate() {
        println!("v[{}] = {}", i, item);
    }
}

let a = 10;
let b = "abcd";
let c = 0.9f64;
show_all(&[&a, &b, &c]);

Note that the vector contains elements of different actual types, but they all satisfy Display trait.

However, trait objects, unlike generics, have a performance impact. Because the compiler does not know their concrete types, it should use vtables to find methods to execute on them. Because trait objects should always be accessed through a pointer, you only can keep them on the stack or box them to store them in structures. It is not possible to save a "bare" trait object into a field of a struct, for example.

Also not all traits can produce trait objects, or, to put it in another way, not all traits are useful with trait objects. For example, trait methods which have Self type in their signatures can't be used on trait objects. The reason should be obvious: these methods require concrete type of the implementor to be known at the call site, which is not the case with trait objects.

Remark: it is actually possible to store bare trait objects in structures, although with some limitations. For example, you can only store a bare trait object as a last field of a structure, and such structure could only be accessed through a pointer because it also becomes unsized. You can read more about unsized types (or dynamically sized types, these are synonyms) here.

It's more that I want to understand why it has to use generics because coming from languages such as C# of Java it could just be a non generic method that uses an interface as a parameter which should roughly translate into a trait in Rust.

You can see from all of the above that generics are much more useful and efficient in the vast majority of situations. Because of this Rust promotes the usage of generics instead of trait objects. So, when you need to write a generic function, you need to start with generics and turn to trait objects only when you really need it. In this regard Rust is different from Java or C#.

However, your specific problem seems to be in that you're calling middleware_stack.add() method which, according to the error message, seems to be generic. It should look like this:

fn add<T: Middleware+Send>(&mut self, handler: T) { ... }

(exactly like your generic version). This is the reason of your error: you're trying to pass trait object inside this function. But trait objects do not implement corresponding traits, that is, their types do not satisfy their respective trait bounds unless these traits are explicitly implemented on them:

impl Middleware for Box<Middleware> { ... }

It seems that this is not the case, and Middleware is not implemented on Box<Middleware>. Hence you cannot call add<T: Middleware+Send>() function on it.

If utilize() method is defined in the same module as MiddlewareStack structure, you can access its field directly:

pub fn utilize(&mut self, handler: Box<Middleware+Send>){
    self.middleware_stack.handlers.push(handler);
}

This will work, but only if this method is defined in the same module as MiddlewareStack structure, because handlers field is private.

Answer to the follow-up

I'm not sure why you decided that the compiler translates

pub fn add<T: Middleware> (&mut self, handler: T) {
    self.handlers.push(box handler);
}

into:

pub fn add (&mut self, handler: Middleware) {
    self.handlers.push(box handler);
}

This is not how it works. The generic version above is monomorphized when called with specific type, that's what the first example in my post shows. For example, if you have impl Middleware for SomeHandler and you invoke self.add(SomeHandler { ... }), the compiler will generate specialized version of add() method:

pub fn add(&mut self, handler: SomeHandler) {
    self.handlers.push(box handler);
}

And how this works should be pretty straightforward.

Answer to the latest follow-up in the comment to the other answer

Last follow up. In the above example you would favor the generic implementation over the non-generic implementation,right? Basically because you wouldn't want to "leak" the boxing all the way up to the caller, right? At least for me that would be the most annoying thing. I don't want to use Box as a parameter and force the caller to call utilize(box some_middleware). That's more beautiful with the generic implementation which doesn't enforce boxing all the way up. Would that be the core motivation?

This is only one motivation, in fact. But the most important one, I believe, is that generics are more efficient. I said it above: monomorphization of generic functions allows for static dispatch, i.e. the compiler knows exactly which variant of the function is called, and can apply optimizations based on this knowledge, for example, inlining. Inlining is just not possible with trait objects because all calls to trait object's methods should go through the virtual table of this object.

You can also read this great explanation (though it is an answer to somewhat different question) by @dbaupp. Just replace Go with Java/C# and you will get roughly the same thing.

| improve this answer | |
  • Thanks for the very detailed answer! I left a follow up in my question. Would be awesome if you could leave some feedback on that. – Christoph Jul 8 '14 at 19:27
  • @Christoph, I've added answers to your follow-ups. They are essentially the same as Arjan's answer, though :) – Vladimir Matveev Jul 9 '14 at 7:47
  • Awesome! Those were the last missing bits. I tend to ask many special (follow up) questions as if I was five years old. That's because I want to soak up every little bit in order really get a deep understanding. Your answer helped me a lot and it deserves a million upvotes :) Thanks for taking so much time! – Christoph Jul 9 '14 at 8:35
1

The compiler will not translate this:

pub fn add<T: Middleware> (&mut self, handler: T) {
    self.handlers.push(box handler);
}

into:

pub fn add (&mut self, handler: Middleware) {
    self.handlers.push(box handler);
}

It will create a specialized version at compile time with a concrete type passed to it:

struct Foo;

impl Middleware for Foo { ... }

pub fn add (&mut self, handler: Foo) {
    self.handlers.push(box handler);
}
| improve this answer | |
  • Last follow up. In the above example you would favor the generic implementation over the non-generic implementation,right? Basically because you wouldn't want to "leak" the boxing all the way up to the caller, right? At least for me that would be the most annoying thing. I don't want to use Box<Middleware> as a parameter and force the caller to call utilize(box some_middleware). That's more beautiful with the generic implementation which doesn't enforce boxing all the way up. Would that be the core motivation? – Christoph Jul 8 '14 at 23:13

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.