6

Can the hash class be modified so that given two hashes, a new hash containing only keys that are present in one hash but not the other can be created?

E.g.:

h1 = {"Cat" => 100, "Dog" => 5, "Bird" => 2, "Snake" => 10}

h2 = {"Cat" => 100, "Dog" => 5, "Bison" => 30}

h1.difference(h2) = {"Bird" => 2, "Snake" => 10}

Optionally, the difference method could include any key/value pairs such that the key is present in both hashes but the value differs between them.

15
h1 = {"Cat" => 100, "Dog" => 5, "Bird" => 2, "Snake" => 10}
h2 = {"Cat" => 999, "Dog" => 5, "Bison" => 30}

Case 1: keep all key/value pairs k=>v in h1 for which there is no key k in h2

This is one way:

h1.dup.delete_if { |k,_| h2.key?(k) }
  #=> {"Bird"=>2, "Snake"=>10}

This is another:

class Array
  alias :spaceship :<=>
  def <=>(o)
    first <=> o.first
  end
end

(h1.to_a - h2.to_a).to_h
  #=> {"Bird"=>2, "Snake"=>10}

class Array
  alias :<=> :spaceship
  remove_method(:spaceship)
end

Case 2: keep all key/value pairs in h1 that are not in h2

All you need for this is:

(h1.to_a - h2.to_a).to_h
  #=> {"Cat"=>100, "Bird"=>2, "Snake"=>10}

Array#to_h was introduced in Ruby 2.0. For earlier versions, use Hash[].

6

Use the reject method:

class Hash
  def difference(other)
    reject do |k,v|
      other.has_key? k
    end
  end
end

To only reject key/value pairs if the values are identical (as per mallanaga's suggestion via a comment on my original answer, which I have deleted):

class Hash
  def difference(other)
    reject do |k,v|
      other.has_key?(k) && other[k] == v
    end
  end
end

  • Hm, I didn't realize that was the convention--must have skimmed that part of Eloquent Ruby a little too quickly. – Kyle Strand Jul 9 '14 at 15:06
  • Great book, but Mr. Olsen probably assumed readers knew about that. If you liked that book, have a look at Metaprogramming Ruby. – Cary Swoveland Jul 9 '14 at 15:47
  • 1
    Some readers may have thought reject returns an array, not a hash. It is true that Enumerable#reject returns an array and the class Hash includes the Enumerable module, but Hash also has the method Hash#reject which returns a hash and has precedence over the Enumerable reject. Same for select. Notice there are methods Hash#reject! and Hash#select!, but no corresponding ! methods in the Enumerable module. – Cary Swoveland Jul 9 '14 at 16:14
2

You can do this:

h2.each_with_object(h1.dup){|(k, v), h| h.delete(k)}
  • The each_with_object method wasn't introduced until Ruby 1.9, and I doubt that's faster than my suggestion of h1.reject{|k,v| h2.has_key? k}. – Kyle Strand Jul 8 '14 at 22:03
  • 3
    @Kyle, what's your point? – Cary Swoveland Jul 8 '14 at 23:10
0

try using hashdiff gem.

diff=HashDiff.diff(h1,h2)
  • Could you provide some more details (and a link)? From rubydoc.info/gems/hashdiff/0.2.2 , it appears that this is doing something somewhat different. For one thing, it returns a list of lists, where each inner list has three elements, rather than a new hash. Also, it appears that if h2 contains elements not in h1, these elements will be represented--which is not the case for a hash subtraction operation. – Kyle Strand Jan 5 '15 at 21:59
  • It does look like a rather cool and useful gem, though. – Kyle Strand Jan 5 '15 at 22:00
0

For deep nesting you can add a bit of recursion, something like (untested)

class Hash
  def -(h2)
    raise ArgumentError unless h2.is_a?(Hash)
    h1 = dup
    h1.delete_if do |k, v|
      if v.is_a?(Hash) && h2[k].is_a?(Hash)
        h1[k] = v - h2[k]
        h1[k].blank?
      else
        h2[k] == v
      end
    end
   end
  end
end

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