I want to be able to use two columns on one table to define a relationship. So using a task app as an example.

Attempt 1:

class User < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :tasks
end

class Task < ActiveRecord::Base
  belongs_to :owner, class_name: "User", foreign_key: "owner_id"
  belongs_to :assignee, class_name: "User", foreign_key: "assignee_id"
end

So then Task.create(owner_id:1, assignee_id: 2)

This allows me to perform Task.first.owner which returns user one and Task.first.assignee which returns user two but User.first.task returns nothing. Which is because task doesn't belong to a user, they belong to owner and assignee. So,

Attempt 2:

class User < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :tasks, foreign_key: [:owner_id, :assignee_id]
end

class Task < ActiveRecord::Base
  belongs_to :user
end

That just fails altogether as two foreign keys don't seem to be supported.

So what I want is to be able to say User.tasks and get both the users owned and assigned tasks.

Basically somehow build a relationship that would equal a query of Task.where(owner_id || assignee_id == 1)

Is that possible?

Update

I'm not looking to use finder_sql, but this issue's unaccepted answer looks to be close to what I want: Rails - Multiple Index Key Association

So this method would look like this,

Attempt 3:

class Task < ActiveRecord::Base
  def self.by_person(person)
    where("assignee_id => :person_id OR owner_id => :person_id", :person_id => person.id
  end 
end

class Person < ActiveRecord::Base

  def tasks
    Task.by_person(self)
  end 
end

Though I can get it to work in Rails 4, I keep getting the following error:

ActiveRecord::PreparedStatementInvalid: missing value for :owner_id in :donor_id => :person_id OR assignee_id => :person_id
  • 1
    Is this gem what you're looking for? github.com/composite-primary-keys/composite_primary_keys – mus Jul 8 '14 at 22:08
  • Thanks for the info mus but this is not what I'm looking for. I want a query for either or column being a given value. Not a composite primary key. – JonathanSimmons Jul 9 '14 at 13:06
  • yeah, the update makes it clear. Forget about the gem. We both thought you just want to use a composed primary key. This should be possible at least by defining a custom scope a scoped relationship. Interesting scenario. I'll have a look a it later – dre-hh Jul 9 '14 at 13:11
  • FWIW my goal here is to get a given users task and retain the ActiveRecord::Relation format so I can continue to use task scopes on the result for search/filtering. – JonathanSimmons Jul 9 '14 at 13:51
up vote 60 down vote accepted

TL;DR

class User < ActiveRecord::Base
  def tasks
    Task.where("owner_id = ? OR assigneed_id = ?", self.id, self.id)
  end
end

Remove has_many :tasks in User class.


Using has_many :tasks doesn't make sense at all as we do not have any column named user_id in table tasks.

What I did to solve the issue in my case is:

class User < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :owned_tasks,    class_name: "Task", foreign_key: "owner_id"
  has_many :assigned_tasks, class_name: "Task", foreign_key: "assignee_id"
end

class Task < ActiveRecord::Base
  belongs_to :owner,    class_name: "User", foreign_key: "owner_id"
  belongs_to :assignee, class_name: "User", foreign_key: "assignee_id"
  # Mentioning `foreign_keys` is not necessary in this class, since
  # we've already mentioned `belongs_to :owner`, and Rails will anticipate
  # foreign_keys automatically. Thanks to @jeffdill2 for mentioning this thing 
  # in the comment.
end

This way, you can call User.first.assigned_tasks as well as User.first.owned_tasks.

Now, you can define a method called tasks that returns the combination of assigned_tasks and owned_tasks.

That could be a good solution as far the readability goes, but from performance point of view, it wouldn't be that much good as now, in order to get the tasks, two queries will be issued instead of once, and then, the result of those two queries need to be joined as well.

So in order to get the tasks that belong to a user, we would define a custom tasks method in User class in the following way:

def tasks
  Task.where("owner_id = ? OR assigneed_id = ?", self.id, self.id)
end

This way, it will fetch all the results in one single query, and we wouldn't have to merge or combine any results.

  • This solution is great! It does imply a requirement for separate access to assign, owned and all tasks respectively. Something that on a large project would be great forethoguht. That however was not a requirement in my case. As for has_many "not making sense" If you read the accepted answer you'd see we did not end up using a has_many declaration at all. Assuming your requirements match the needs of every other visitor is unproductive, this answer could have been a less judgmental. – JonathanSimmons Nov 19 '15 at 16:22
  • That being said I do believe this is the better long term setup we should be advocating to people with this problem. If you would revise your answer to include a basic example of the other models and the user method to retrieve the combined set of tasks I'll revise it as the selected answer. Thanks! – JonathanSimmons Nov 19 '15 at 16:24
  • 2
    Just an FYI, the foreign keys specified in the Task model are actually not necessary. Since you have the belongs_to relationships named :owner and :assignee, Rails will assume by default that foreign keys are named owner_id and assignee_id, respectively. – jeffdill2 Dec 11 '15 at 16:12
  • 1
    @ArslanAli no problem. :-) – jeffdill2 Dec 14 '15 at 14:54
  • 2
    good point! thank you so much! – zx1986 Dec 8 '16 at 1:53

Rails 5:

you need to unscope the default where clause see @Dwight answer if you still want a has_many associaiton.

Though User.joins(:tasks) gives me

ArgumentError: The association scope 'tasks' is instance dependent (the scope block takes an argument). Preloading instance dependent scopes is not supported.

As it is no longer possible you can use @Arslan Ali solution as well.

Rails 4:

class User < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :tasks, ->(user){ where("tasks.owner_id = :user_id OR tasks.assignee_id = :user_id", user_id: user.id) }
end

Update1: Regarding @JonathanSimmons comment

Having to pass the user object into the scope on the User model seems like a backwards approach

You don't have to pass the user model to this scope. The current user instance is passed automatically to this lambda. Call it like this:

user = User.find(9001)
user.tasks

Update2:

if possible could you expand this answer to explain what's happening? I'd like to understand it better so I can implement something similar. thanks

Calling has_many :tasks on ActiveRecord class will store a lambda function in some class variable and is just a fancy way to generate a tasks method on its object, which will call this lambda. The generated method would look similar to following pseudocode:

class User

  def tasks
   #define join query
   query = self.class.joins('tasks ON ...')
   #execute tasks_lambda on the query instance and pass self to the lambda
   query.instance_exec(self, self.class.tasks_lambda)
  end

end
  • 1
    so awesome, everywhere else i looked people kept trying to suggest using this outdated gem for composite keys – FireDragon Mar 30 '15 at 7:03
  • 2
    If possible could you expand this answer to explain what's happening? I'd like to understand it better so I can implement something similar. thanks – Stephen Lead Nov 19 '15 at 1:16
  • 1
    Thanks, this should be the accepted answer. – Aeramor Jan 29 '16 at 19:22
  • 1
    This looks promising but with Rails 5 ends up still using the foreign_key with a where query instead of just using the lambda above – Mohamed El Mahallawy Jan 23 '17 at 7:31
  • 1
    Yeah, it appears as though this no longer works in Rails 5. – Dwight Feb 1 '17 at 11:04

I worked out a solution for this. I'm open to any pointers on how I can make this better.

class User < ActiveRecord::Base

  def tasks
    Task.by_person(self.id)
  end 
end

class Task < ActiveRecord::Base

  scope :completed, -> { where(completed: true) }   

  belongs_to :owner, class_name: "User", foreign_key: "owner_id"
  belongs_to :assignee, class_name: "User", foreign_key: "assignee_id"

  def self.by_person(user_id)
    where("owner_id = :person_id OR assignee_id = :person_id", person_id: user_id)
  end 
end

This basically overrides the has_many association but still returns the ActiveRecord::Relation object I was looking for.

So now I can do something like this:

User.first.tasks.completed and the result is all completed task owned or assigned to the first user.

  • are you still using this method to solve your question? I am in the same boat and am wondering if you have learnt a new way or if this is still the best option. – Dan Oct 19 '14 at 0:00
  • Still the best option I've found. – JonathanSimmons Oct 19 '14 at 0:11
  • Is there a point in adding the has_many relationship ? – Crystark Jan 30 '15 at 10:49
  • That is likely a remnant of old attempts. Edited the answer to remove it. – JonathanSimmons Jan 31 '15 at 17:42
  • 1
    Would this and dre-hh's answer below accomplish the same thing? – dkniffin Sep 10 '15 at 12:32

Extending upon @dre-hh's answer above, which I found no longer works as expected in Rails 5. It appears Rails 5 now includes a default where clause to the effect of WHERE tasks.user_id = ?, which fails as there is no user_id column in this scenario.

I've found it is still possible to get it working with a has_many association, you just need to unscope this additional where clause added by Rails.

class User < ApplicationRecord
  has_many :tasks, ->(user) { unscope(:where).where("owner_id = :id OR assignee_id = :id", id: user.id) }
end
  • Thank you! This worked perfectly! – Noah Davis Feb 7 '17 at 3:17
  • Thanks @Dwight, I never would have thought of this! – Gabe Kopley Aug 22 '17 at 2:25

My answer to Associations and (multiple) foreign keys in rails (3.2) : how to describe them in the model, and write up migrations is just for you!

As for your code,here are my modifications

class User < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :tasks, ->(user) { unscope(where: :user_id).where("owner_id = ? OR assignee_id = ?", user.id, user.id) }, class_name: 'Task'
end

class Task < ActiveRecord::Base
  belongs_to :owner, class_name: "User", foreign_key: "owner_id"
  belongs_to :assignee, class_name: "User", foreign_key: "assignee_id"
end

Warning: If you are using RailsAdmin and need to create new record or edit existing record,please don't do what I've suggested.Because this hack will cause problem when you do something like this:

current_user.tasks.build(params)

The reason is that rails will try to use current_user.id to fill task.user_id,only to find that there is nothing like user_id.

So,consider my hack method as an way outside the box,but don't do that.

  • Not sure this answer provides anything the approved answer didn't already. Moreover, it feels like an advertisement for another question. – JonathanSimmons Dec 18 '16 at 2:56
  • thanks for your opinion,@JonathanSimmons – sunsoft Dec 19 '16 at 5:50

Your Answer

 

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.