Is there any gain in speed, memory usage, whatever, in Swift by defining as much as possible constants x vars?

I mean, defining as much as possible with let instead of var?

up vote 11 down vote accepted

In theory, there should be no difference in speed or memory usage - internally, the variables work the same. In practice, letting the compiler know that something is a constant might result in better optimisations.

However the most important reason is that using constants (or immutable objects) helps to prevent programmer errors. It's not by accident that method parameters and iterators are constant by default.

Using immutable objects is also very useful in multithreaded applications because they prevent one type of synchronization problems.

  • thanks for the explanation! – SpaceDog Jul 9 '14 at 10:47
  • 1
    "In theory, there should be no difference in speed or memory usage - internally, the variables work the same." This sounds really wrong to me? If you do a 'let a = 5', there won't be any 'instance variable'. It's a constant Int number and no memory needs to be allocated for that. Nor does the CPU need to fetch the value from RAM. It is constant after all and will be significantly faster than a variable. So YES, if something is constant, declare it as such, it'll give you way faster code. Unless most of your program runs in other peoples frameworks - aka Cocoa/UIKit ;-) – hnh Jul 9 '14 at 21:34
  • @hnh That's exactly one of the optimisations I am talking about. Even with var a = 5 the compiler can decide that it doesn't really need the variable (because it knows how the variable is used) so there doesn't have to be a difference, let only enables the compiler to optimize better. – Sulthan Jul 10 '14 at 8:30

Your Answer

 

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.