170

I have a CSV file with about 2000 records.

Each record has a string, and a category to it.

This is the first line, Line1
This is the second line, Line2
This is the third line, Line3

I need to read this file into a list that looks like this;

List = [('This is the first line', 'Line1'),
        ('This is the second line', 'Line2'),
        ('This is the third line', 'Line3')]

How can import this this csv to the list I need using Python?

12 Answers 12

279

Use the csv module (Python 2.x):

import csv
with open('file.csv', 'rb') as f:
    reader = csv.reader(f)
    your_list = list(reader)

print your_list
# [['This is the first line', 'Line1'],
#  ['This is the second line', 'Line2'],
#  ['This is the third line', 'Line3']]

If you need tuples:

import csv
with open('test.csv', 'rb') as f:
    reader = csv.reader(f)
    your_list = map(tuple, reader)

print your_list
# [('This is the first line', ' Line1'),
#  ('This is the second line', ' Line2'),
#  ('This is the third line', ' Line3')]

Python 3.x version (by @seokhoonlee below)

import csv

with open('file.csv', 'r') as f:
  reader = csv.reader(f)
  your_list = list(reader)

print(your_list)
# [['This is the first line', 'Line1'],
#  ['This is the second line', 'Line2'],
#  ['This is the third line', 'Line3']]
  • 4
    Why do you use 'rb' instead of 'r'? – Drunken Master May 21 '15 at 14:28
  • 5
    @DrunkenMaster, b causes the file to be opened in binary mode as opposed to text mode. On some systems text mode means that \n will be convertes to platform-specific new line when reading or writing. See docs. – Maciej Gol May 24 '15 at 8:12
  • 7
    This does not work in Python 3.x : "csv.Error: iterator should return strings, not bytes (did you open the file in text mode?)" See below for the answer that works in Python 3.x – Gilbert May 30 '16 at 18:12
  • 2
    to save a few seconds of time debugging, you should probably add a note for the first solution, like "Python 2.x version" – paradite Jan 30 '17 at 9:03
  • How to use your 1st solution but with only some columns from the csv file? – Sigur May 6 '17 at 3:13
50

Updated for Python 3:

import csv

with open('file.csv', newline='') as f:
    reader = csv.reader(f)
    your_list = list(reader)

print(your_list)

Output:

[['This is the first line', 'Line1'], ['This is the second line', 'Line2'], ['This is the third line', 'Line3']]
  • Specifying 'r' is the default mode, so specifying it is unnecessary. The docs also mention If csvfile is a file object, it should be opened with newline=''. – AMC Jan 6 at 1:40
38

Pandas is pretty good at dealing with data. Here is one example how to use it:

import pandas as pd

# Read the CSV into a pandas data frame (df)
#   With a df you can do many things
#   most important: visualize data with Seaborn
df = pd.read_csv('filename.csv', delimiter=',')

# Or export it in many ways, e.g. a list of tuples
tuples = [tuple(x) for x in df.values]

# or export it as a list of dicts
dicts = df.to_dict().values()

One big advantage is that pandas deals automatically with header rows.

If you haven't heard of Seaborn, I recommend having a look at it.

See also: How do I read and write CSV files with Python?

Pandas #2

import pandas as pd

# Get data - reading the CSV file
import mpu.pd
df = mpu.pd.example_df()

# Convert
dicts = df.to_dict('records')

The content of df is:

     country   population population_time    EUR
0    Germany   82521653.0      2016-12-01   True
1     France   66991000.0      2017-01-01   True
2  Indonesia  255461700.0      2017-01-01  False
3    Ireland    4761865.0             NaT   True
4      Spain   46549045.0      2017-06-01   True
5    Vatican          NaN             NaT   True

The content of dicts is

[{'country': 'Germany', 'population': 82521653.0, 'population_time': Timestamp('2016-12-01 00:00:00'), 'EUR': True},
 {'country': 'France', 'population': 66991000.0, 'population_time': Timestamp('2017-01-01 00:00:00'), 'EUR': True},
 {'country': 'Indonesia', 'population': 255461700.0, 'population_time': Timestamp('2017-01-01 00:00:00'), 'EUR': False},
 {'country': 'Ireland', 'population': 4761865.0, 'population_time': NaT, 'EUR': True},
 {'country': 'Spain', 'population': 46549045.0, 'population_time': Timestamp('2017-06-01 00:00:00'), 'EUR': True},
 {'country': 'Vatican', 'population': nan, 'population_time': NaT, 'EUR': True}]

Pandas #3

import pandas as pd

# Get data - reading the CSV file
import mpu.pd
df = mpu.pd.example_df()

# Convert
lists = [[row[col] for col in df.columns] for row in df.to_dict('records')]

The content of lists is:

[['Germany', 82521653.0, Timestamp('2016-12-01 00:00:00'), True],
 ['France', 66991000.0, Timestamp('2017-01-01 00:00:00'), True],
 ['Indonesia', 255461700.0, Timestamp('2017-01-01 00:00:00'), False],
 ['Ireland', 4761865.0, NaT, True],
 ['Spain', 46549045.0, Timestamp('2017-06-01 00:00:00'), True],
 ['Vatican', nan, NaT, True]]
  • tuples = [tuple(x) for x in df.values] can be written tuples = list(df.itertuples(index=False)) instead. Do note that the Pandas docs discourage the use of .values in favour of .to_numpy(). The third example is confusing to me. First, because the variable is named tuples, which would imply that it is a list of tuples, whereas it's actually a list of lists. Second, because as far as I can tell that entire expression can be replaced with df.to_list(). I also don't know if the second example is really relevant here. – AMC Jan 6 at 2:05
8

Update for Python3:

import csv
from pprint import pprint

with open('text.csv', newline='') as file:
    reader = csv.reader(file)
    res = list(map(tuple, reader))

pprint(res)

Output:

[('This is the first line', ' Line1'),
 ('This is the second line', ' Line2'),
 ('This is the third line', ' Line3')]

If csvfile is a file object, it should be opened with newline=''.
csv module

  • Why use list(map()) over a list comprehension? Also, notice the whitespace in at the beginning of each element of the second column. – AMC Jan 6 at 17:14
5

If you are sure there are no commas in your input, other than to separate the category, you can read the file line by line and split on ,, then push the result to List

That said, it looks like you are looking at a CSV file, so you might consider using the modules for it

4
result = []
for line in text.splitlines():
    result.append(tuple(line.split(",")))
  • 1
    Can you please add a bit of explanation to this post? Code only is (sometimes) good, but code and explanation is (most times) better – Barranka Jul 9 '14 at 20:29
  • 3
    I know Barranka's comment is over a year old, but for anyone who stumbles upon this and can't figure it out: for line in text.splitlines(): puts each individual line in temp variable "line". line.split(",") creates a list of strings that are split on the comma. tuple(~) puts that list in a tuple and append(~) adds it to the result. After the loop, result is a list of tuples, with each tuple a line, and each tuple element an element in the csv file. – Louis Oct 18 '15 at 10:05
  • In addition to what @Louis said, there is no need to use .read().splitlines(), you can iterate over the each line of the file directly: for line in in_file: res.append(tuple(line.rstrip().split(","))) Also, do note that using .split(',') means that every element of the second column will begin with extra whitespace. – AMC Jan 6 at 17:22
  • Addendum to the code I just shared above: line.rstrip() -> line.rstrip('\n'). – AMC Jan 6 at 17:29
3

As said already in the comments you can use the csv library in python. csv means comma separated values which seems exactly your case: a label and a value separated by a comma.

Being a category and value type I would rather use a dictionary type instead of a list of tuples.

Anyway in the code below I show both ways: d is the dictionary and l is the list of tuples.

import csv

file_name = "test.txt"
try:
    csvfile = open(file_name, 'rt')
except:
    print("File not found")
csvReader = csv.reader(csvfile, delimiter=",")
d = dict()
l =  list()
for row in csvReader:
    d[row[1]] = row[0]
    l.append((row[0], row[1]))
print(d)
print(l)
  • Why not use a context manager to handle the file? Why are you mixing two different variable naming conventions? Isn't (row[0], row[1]) weaker/more error-prone than just using tuple(row)? – AMC Jan 6 at 1:22
  • Why do u think doing tuple(row) is less error prone?what variable naming convention are u referring to? Please link an official python naming convention. As far as I know try -except is a good way to handle files: what do u mean by context handler? – Francesco Boi Jan 6 at 15:41
  • Why do u think doing tuple(row) is less error prone? Because it doesn’t require that you write out every single index manually. If you make a mistake, or the number of elements changes, you have to go back and change your code. The try-except is fine, context managers are the with statement. You can find plenty of resources on the subject, such as this one. – AMC Jan 6 at 15:44
  • I don't see how the context manager would be better than the ol' good try-except block. For the other the positive aspect is that u type less code; for the rest if number of elements (I guess u mean the number of columns) changes mine is better because it is extracting only the desired values while the other it's extracting all the excel. Without any specific requirement you cannot say which is better so it's a waste of time arguing which is better:in this case both are valid – Francesco Boi Jan 6 at 16:09
  • I don't see how the context manager would be better than the ol' good try-except block. Please see my previous comment, the context manager would not replace the try-except. – AMC Jan 6 at 17:07
2

A simple loop would suffice:

lines = []
with open('test.txt', 'r') as f:
    for line in f.readlines():
        l,name = line.strip().split(',')
        lines.append((l,name))

print lines
  • 1
    What if some of the entries have commas in them? – Tony Ennis Feb 16 '16 at 17:59
  • @TonyEnnis Then you would need to use a more advanced processing loop. The answer by Maciej above shows how to use the csv parser that comes with Python to perform this operation. This parser most likely has all of the logic you need. – Hunter McMillen Feb 16 '16 at 18:21
1

Unfortunately I find none of the existing answers particularly satisfying.

Here is a straightforward and complete Python 3 solution, using the csv module.

import csv

with open('../resources/temp_in.csv', newline='') as f:
    reader = csv.reader(f, skipinitialspace=True)
    rows = list(reader)

print(rows)

Notice the skipinitialspace=True argument. This is necessary since, unfortunately, OP's CSV contains whitespace after each comma.

Output:

[['This is the first line', 'Line1'], ['This is the second line', 'Line2'], ['This is the third line', 'Line3']]
0

Extending your requirements a bit and assuming you do not care about the order of lines and want to get them grouped under categories, the following solution may work for you:

>>> fname = "lines.txt"
>>> from collections import defaultdict
>>> dct = defaultdict(list)
>>> with open(fname) as f:
...     for line in f:
...         text, cat = line.rstrip("\n").split(",", 1)
...         dct[cat].append(text)
...
>>> dct
defaultdict(<type 'list'>, {' CatA': ['This is the first line', 'This is the another line'], ' CatC': ['This is the third line'], ' CatB': ['This is the second line', 'This is the last line']})

This way you get all relevant lines available in the dictionary under key being the category.

0

Here is the easiest way in Python 3.x to import a CSV to a multidimensional array, and its only 4 lines of code without importing anything!

#pull a CSV into a multidimensional array in 4 lines!

L=[]                            #Create an empty list for the main array
for line in open('log.txt'):    #Open the file and read all the lines
    x=line.rstrip()             #Strip the \n from each line
    L.append(x.split(','))      #Split each line into a list and add it to the
                                #Multidimensional array
print(L)
  • Be careful, it's a list, not an array! Why not use a context manager to properly handle the file object? Note that this solution leaves extra whitespace on the second item in each row, and that it will fail if any of the data contains a comma. – AMC Jan 6 at 1:19
-1

Next is a piece of code which uses csv module but extracts file.csv contents to a list of dicts using the first line which is a header of csv table

import csv
def csv2dicts(filename):
  with open(filename, 'rb') as f:
    reader = csv.reader(f)
    lines = list(reader)
    if len(lines) < 2: return None
    names = lines[0]
    if len(names) < 1: return None
    dicts = []
    for values in lines[1:]:
      if len(values) != len(names): return None
      d = {}
      for i,_ in enumerate(names):
        d[names[i]] = values[i]
      dicts.append(d)
    return dicts
  return None

if __name__ == '__main__':
  your_list = csv2dicts('file.csv')
  print your_list
  • 1
    Why not just use csv.DictReader? – AMC Jan 6 at 0:10

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