27

This question already has an answer here:

How would I download files (video) with Python using wget and save them locally? There will be a bunch of files, so how do I know that one file is downloaded so as to automatically start downloding another one?

Thanks.

marked as duplicate by larsks, plaes, Ashwini Chaudhary, jszumski, Phil Hannent May 23 '13 at 12:48

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

20

Short answer (simplified). To get one file

 import urllib
 urllib.urlretrieve("http://google.com/index.html", filename="local/index.html")

You can figure out how to loop that if necessary.

19

Don't do this. Use either urllib2 or urlgrabber instead.

  • 11
    This answer needs to be expanded. Why shouldn't wget be used? – muhuk Mar 18 '10 at 10:26
  • 11
    Because it starts a whole new process just to do things that Python itself is capable of. – Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Mar 18 '10 at 10:36
  • 6
    Because it undermines portability. – Ekevoo Apr 14 '11 at 0:51
  • 7
    Is it nontrivial to write wget -rl1 -I /stuff/i/want/ http://url/<incrementing number> with either of these libs? – Seppo Erviälä Jun 27 '12 at 8:59
  • 5
    wget works through a VPN client, whereas urllib gives me this error for a https: urlopen error Tunnel connection failed: 407 Proxy Authentication Required – tommy.carstensen Feb 8 '15 at 18:36
10

If you use os.system() to spawn a process for the wget, it will block until wget finishes the download (or quits with an error). So, just call os.system('wget blah') in a loop until you've downloaded all of your files.

Alternatively, you can use urllib2 or httplib. You'll have to write a non-trivial amount code, but you'll get better performance, since you can reuse a single HTTP connection to download many files, as opposed to opening a new connection for each file.

9

No reason to use os.system. Avoid writing a shell script in Python and go with something like urllib.urlretrieve or an equivalent.

Edit... to answer the second part of your question, you can set up a thread pool using the standard library Queue class. Since you're doing a lot of downloading, the GIL shouldn't be a problem. Generate a list of the URLs you wish to download and feed them to your work queue. It will handle pushing requests to worker threads.

I'm waiting for a database update to complete, so I put this together real quick.


#!/usr/bin/python

import sys
import threading
import urllib
from Queue import Queue
import logging

class Downloader(threading.Thread):
    def __init__(self, queue):
        super(Downloader, self).__init__()
        self.queue = queue

    def run(self):
        while True:
            download_url, save_as = queue.get()
            # sentinal
            if not download_url:
                return
            try:
                urllib.urlretrieve(download_url, filename=save_as)
            except Exception, e:
                logging.warn("error downloading %s: %s" % (download_url, e))

if __name__ == '__main__':
    queue = Queue()
    threads = []
    for i in xrange(5):
        threads.append(Downloader(queue))
        threads[-1].start()

    for line in sys.stdin:
        url = line.strip()
        filename = url.split('/')[-1]
        print "Download %s as %s" % (url, filename)
        queue.put((url, filename))

    # if we get here, stdin has gotten the ^D
    print "Finishing current downloads"
    for i in xrange(5):
        queue.put((None, None))

  • 1
    there is a mistake in download_url, save_as = queue.get(). should be download_url, save_as = self.queue.get(). – disfated Nov 26 '11 at 2:08
1

Install wget via pypi http://pypi.python.org/pypi/wget/0.3

pip install wget

then run, just as documented

python -m wget <url>
  • 11
    For anyone else who found this confusing, the linked library doesn't use wget. It uses urllib. And it currently doesn't support anything close to what wget ( gnu.org/software/wget ) does. – Rob Russell Dec 31 '13 at 16:58
-5

No reason to use python. Avoid writing a shell script in Python and go with something like bash or an equivalent.

  • 2
    Writing a shell script in Python is OK. If you want to get something done quickly but you hate the syntax of bash, just do it in Python. If you make a larger project, then yes, try to avoid these external calls. – Jabba Apr 11 '12 at 7:10
  • 3
    Python is a fine scripting language. – Mark Lakata Nov 15 '12 at 0:00

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