54

Right now my regex is something like this:

[a-zA-Z0-9] but it does not include accented characters like I would want to. I would also like - ' , to be included.

4

5 Answers 5

41

Accented Characters: DIY Character Range Subtraction

If your regex engine allows it (and many will), this will work:

(?i)^(?:(?![×Þß÷þø])[-'0-9a-zÀ-ÿ])+$

Please see the demo (you can add characters to test).

Explanation

  • (?i) sets case-insensitive mode
  • The ^ anchor asserts that we are at the beginning of the string
  • (?:(?![×Þß÷þø])[-'0-9a-zÀ-ÿ]) matches one character...
  • The lookahead (?![×Þß÷þø]) asserts that the char is not one of those in the brackets
  • [-'0-9a-zÀ-ÿ] allows dash, apostrophe, digits, letters, and chars in a wide accented range, from which we need to subtract
  • The + matches that one or more times
  • The $ anchor asserts that we are at the end of the string

Reference

Extended ASCII Table

7
  • Should it not be À-Ž? Commented Mar 9, 2018 at 2:49
  • 1
    Not sure what language you are targeting, but you would also need to add œ and Œ for some (French among others), which falls outside the range described here...
    – Will59
    Commented Dec 10, 2019 at 15:27
  • 1
    Doesn't match Šš.
    – Gajus
    Commented Feb 19, 2020 at 9:39
  • The demo is outdated and the regex from the answer should be copied to see it work.
    – CharlesG
    Commented May 6, 2020 at 17:01
  • Don't forget the period and comma for "Bob, Jr."
    – thdoan
    Commented Jun 23, 2021 at 1:09
29

You put in your expression:

\p{L}\p{M}

This in Unicode will match:

  • any letter character (L) from any language
  • and marks (M)(i.e, a character that is to be combined with another: accent, etc.)
5
  • 2
    You were missing the /u - the complete regex is /\p{L}+|\p{M}+/ugm regex101.com/r/H59XSX/1
    – mplungjan
    Commented Jul 13, 2021 at 6:23
  • 1
    this addresses a different problem
    – NightCoder
    Commented Jul 18, 2021 at 22:05
  • thanks, only this nice solution works for East Europe string I have (Sójkowska)
    – bcag2
    Commented Jul 26, 2021 at 7:59
  • 1
    Had a better mileage with /[\p{L}\p{M}\d'-]+/ugm which includes the hyphen (as requested), an apostrophe (which usually makes sense, too) and numbers. If you don't want numbers (which can carry meaning just like a word), just leave the tailing \d away. regex101.com/r/O4WLyd/1
    – Jan
    Commented Jan 2, 2022 at 10:34
  • Instead of [\p{L}\d] you should use [\p{L}\p{D}] for any letter any digit in any alphabet, or the special \p{LD} for the one-shot combo.
    – Bohemian
    Commented Jun 3 at 6:00
6

A version without the exclusion rules:

^[-'a-zA-ZÀ-ÖØ-öø-ÿ]+$

Explanation

  • The ^ anchor asserts that we are at the beginning of the string
  • [...] allows dash, apostrophe, digits, letters, and chars in a wide accented range,
  • The + matches that one or more times
  • The $ anchor asserts that we are at the end of the string

Reference

3
  • 4
    Note that this misses numerous accented characters, including ӑ, ā, ć, n̈, and ō. It also includes characters the OP may not necessarily want, such as æ, Æ, Þ, þ, ß, and ø. See regex101.com/r/gY7rO4/263 Commented Sep 14, 2018 at 3:08
  • 1
    It does, however, cover the requirement of "good" coverage of the most common accented characters and easily modifiable to any readers requirements. æ, ć, n̈, ō, ß, and ø are in my requirement set. Great testing tool!
    – just.jules
    Commented Sep 15, 2018 at 6:24
  • Version 264 of the regex linked above has more matches and is a little more eloquent using case insensitive matching /(?![×Þß÷þ])[a-zá-žàấӑệởș]/ui regex101.com/r/gY7rO4/264 except unsure why the ø is removed (brød = bread in norwegian/danish) Commented Sep 11, 2020 at 8:47
5

@NightCoder's answer works perfectly in PHP:

    \p{L}\p{M}

and with no brittle whitelists. Note that to get it working in javascript you need to add the unicode u flag. Useful to have a working example in javascript...

const text = `Crêpes are øh-so déclassée`
[ ...text.matchAll(  /[-'’\p{L}\p{M}\p{N}]+/giu  ) ]

will return something like...

[
    {
        "0": "Crêpes",
        "index": 0
    },
    {
        "0": "are",
        "index": 7
    },
    {
        "0": "øh-so",
        "index": 11
    },
    {
        "0": "déclassée",
        "index": 17
    }
]

Here it is in a playground... https://regex101.com/r/ifgH4H/1/

And also some detail on those regex unicode categories... https://javascript.info/regexp-unicode

4

Use a POSIX character class (http://www.regular-expressions.info/posixbrackets.html):

[-'[:alpha:]0-9] or [-'[:alnum:]]

The [:alpha:] character class matches whatever is considered "alphabetic characters" in your locale.

1
  • He wants accented characters. In many engines this will not match Ô, à, é etc.
    – zx81
    Commented Jul 10, 2014 at 12:43

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