4

I have read in Scott Meyers' Effective C++ book that:

When you inline a function you may enable the compiler to perform context specific optimizations on the body of function. Such optimization would be impossible for normal function calls.

Now the question is: what is context specific optimization and why it is necessary?

4 Answers 4

6

I don't think "context specific optimization" is a defined term, but I think it basically means the compiler can analyse the call site and the code around it and use this information to optimise the function.

Here's an example. It's contrived, of course, but it should demonstrate the idea:

Function:

int foo(int i)
{
  if (i < 0) throw std::invalid_argument("");
  return -i;
}

Call site:

int bar()
{
  int i = 5;
  return foo(i);
}

If foo is compiled separately, it must contain a comparison and exception-throwing code. If it's inlined in bar, the compiler sees this code:

int bar()
{
  int i = 5;
  if (i < 0) throw std::invalid_argument("");
  return -i;
}

Any sane optimiser will evaluate this as

int bar()
{
  return -5;
}
2

If the compile choose to inline a function, it will replace a function call to this function by the body of the function. It now has more code to optimize inside the caller function body. Therefore, it often leads to better code.

Imagine that:

bool callee(bool a){
   if(a) return false;
   else return true;
}

void caller(){
   if(callee(true)){
       //Do something
   }   
   //Do something
}

Once inlined, the code will be like this (approximatively):

void caller(){
   bool a = true;
   bool ret;
   if(a) ret = false;
   else ret = true;

   if(ret){
       //Do something
   }   
   //Do something
}

Which may be optimized further too:

void caller(){
   if(false){
       //Do something
   }   
   //Do something
}

And then to:

void caller(){
   //Do something
}

The function is now much smaller and you don't have the cost of the function call and especially (regarding the question) the cost of branching.

2

Say the function is

void fun( bool b) { if(b) do_sth1(); else do_sth2(); }

and it is called in the context with pre-defined false parameter

bool param = false;
...
fun( param);

then the compiler may reduce the function body to

...
do_sth2();
0

I don't think that context specific optimization means something specific and you probably can't find exact definition.

Nice example would be classical getter for some class attributes, without inlining it program has to:

  1. jump to getter body
  2. move value to registry (eax on x86 under windows with default Visual studio settings)
  3. jump back to callee
  4. move value from eax to local variable

While using inlining can skip almost all the work and move value directly to local variable.

Optimizations strictly depend on compiler but lot of think can happen (variable allocation may be skipped, code may get reorder and so on... But you always save call/jump which is expensive instruction.

More reading on optimisation here.

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