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Currently I have a program which goes through a list of vector coordinates and performs a simple math function on the two vectors, but I want to make a loop inside of a loop to be able to have more control on what happens, this is my program so far:

import operator
import numpy as np
b = 0
a = 1
for a in range(0,56): 
    vector1 = (int(l[b][0]),int(l[b][1]),int(l[b][2]))
    vector2 = (int(l[a][0]),int(l[a][1]),int(l[a][2]))
#print vector1
#print vector2
    x = vector1
    y = vector2
vector3 = list(np.array(x) - np.array(y))
#print vector3
    dotProduct = reduce( operator.add, map( operator.mul, vector3, vector3))
    print dotProduct
    a += 1

But what I want is that once a hits 56 and does its final run through, I want B to add 1 and a to reset back to zero, and redo the loop of operations until b goes up to 55.

Desired output: example of coordiantes:

Cu 46.7176 27.1121 27.1121

Cu 43.2505 36.0618 32.4879

Cu 43.3392 36.0964 28.9236

Cu 43.2509 37.8362 27.1091

Cu 34.4872 14.1794 16.5767

Cu 34.4103 16.0364 14.3521

Cu 32.7006 14.069 14.412

and I want the first coordinate to perform the dot product with everything under it, and go back and then start with the second coordinate and perform dot product with everything under it, and so on..

14
  • 1
    Have you just TRIED putting a loop in a loop? Its nothing special. But you need to make sure you're indenting properly. Proper indenting is NOT OPTIONAL in Python. For info on nesting loops, just see the Python wiki at wiki.python.org/moin/ForLoop Jul 10, 2014 at 16:53
  • Not sure if this is your actual code but keep in mind white space matters, and you don't need to increment a in the for loop as python does this for you.
    – MrAlias
    Jul 10, 2014 at 16:53
  • Also it would be helpful if the source in the question were properly indented
    – holdenweb
    Jul 10, 2014 at 16:53
  • My indentation is correct it just doesn't show up when you copy and paste into the question box. Jul 10, 2014 at 16:54
  • 2
    I don't mean to be a jerk here but just Googling "python loop inside loop" brings up tons of results that tell you exactly what you want to do. How much research did you do before coming to SO? Jul 10, 2014 at 17:07

4 Answers 4

4

You can do a nested for loop. Below is what you want:

for b in range(0, 56):
    for a in range(0, 57):
5
  • But as far as I can tell both a and b will increase at the same time, but I want b to only increase once a has reached 56. Jul 10, 2014 at 16:57
  • 3
    I don't know much about NumPy so I can take your word for it. I just answered the user's question about nesting loops to solve his problem.
    – ruthless
    Jul 10, 2014 at 16:57
  • b will only increase when a goes through a cycle from 0 to 55.
    – ruthless
    Jul 10, 2014 at 16:58
  • 4
    @Wana_B3_Nerd run it with print a, b inside and you see that you wrong.
    – furas
    Jul 10, 2014 at 17:00
  • @Wana_B3_Nerd: You're failing to grasp the concept of nested loops. The code above would make b loop 56 times, and for each time it loops, a will look 57 times. Jul 10, 2014 at 17:01
3

Run this and see what you get (before you ask another question)

for b in range(56):
    for a in range(57):
        print "a:", a, "b:", b

Answer to question in comment:

You can use b as argument in inner loop

for b in range(56):
    for a in range(b+1, 57):
        print "a:", a, "b:", b

you could try with smaller range to see all results on one screen

for b in range(6):
    for a in range(b+1, 7):
        print "a:", a, "b:", b

result:

a: 1 b: 0
a: 2 b: 0
a: 3 b: 0
a: 4 b: 0
a: 5 b: 0
a: 6 b: 0
a: 2 b: 1
a: 3 b: 1
a: 4 b: 1
a: 5 b: 1
a: 6 b: 1
a: 3 b: 2
a: 4 b: 2
a: 5 b: 2
a: 6 b: 2
a: 4 b: 3
a: 5 b: 3
a: 6 b: 3
a: 5 b: 4
a: 6 b: 4
a: 6 b: 5
4
  • This works perfectly, but I realized that when it loops I get repetitive results, for example in the first loop vector 1 will perform operation with vector 2 , but when it loops again vector 2 will do the operation with vector 1 causing repetitive results Jul 10, 2014 at 17:16
  • Try new example. Maybe try with smaller range to see all results on one screen.
    – furas
    Jul 10, 2014 at 17:20
  • This gets sooooo close, except the only problem is that it includes the vector doing dot product on itself, example: it does Vector 1-vector1 instead of starting on vector 1-vector 2 Jul 10, 2014 at 17:42
  • Then use b+1 in range(b+1, 7)
    – furas
    Jul 10, 2014 at 17:46
0

You can use while loop instead of for loop :

b = 0
a = 0

while a <= 56 :
    import operator
    import numpy as np
    vector1 = (int(l[b][0]), int(l[b][1]), int(l[b][2]))
    vector2 = (int(l[a][0]),int(l[a][1]),int(l[a][2]))
    #print vector1
    #print vector2
    x = vector1
    y = vector2
    vector3 = list(np.array(x) - np.array(y))
    #print vector3
    dotProduct = reduce( operator.add, map( operator.mul, vector3, vector3))
    print dotProduct


    if a == 56 :
        b += 1
        a = 0
    else:        
        a += 1

    if b == 55:
        break
2
  • 1
    While this would work, its a terrible way to do it. Using nested for loops is going to be much easier to read, and probably faster as well. Otherwise, you're just re-inventing the for loop in an ugly, verbose way. Jul 10, 2014 at 17:11
  • 1
    As said Sohcahtoa82 - for loop is simpler and nicer. You don't need if/else/break and +=.
    – furas
    Jul 10, 2014 at 17:12
0

If I understand your problem statement, you have a 2D matrix of dimension (56, 2), and for each of the rows,

  • you are finding the difference
  • squaring it
  • accumulating the sum of the resultant 1D vector

or in set notation

{∑({(row_1 - row_0)^2 | row_1 ∈ Matrix}) | row_0 ∈ Matrix}

as you are already using numpy, it is a straight forward solution

[np.sum((l - row)**2) for row in l]
2
  • Its actually 3D, as you can see I listed some sample data in the question itself. Jul 10, 2014 at 17:33
  • @Wana_B3_Nerd: I would suggest you to provide a striped down sample input and the desired output in your question.
    – Abhijit
    Jul 10, 2014 at 17:37

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