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I am developing a ASP.NET Web Api and a ASP.NET Website. The website will make use of the Web Api and a mobile app will also be using the Web Api via REST.

Developing these two separately is going fine, however I am now at the stage where I would like to start testing the Web Api from the Website, ideally all from within visual studio. For instance, I have a page where I have a form, that when completed would call my Web Api to add a user to the database.Uploading these online for testing is naturally out of the question.

So what is the best practice here? Can you simply reference the Web Api from within the Website project (Aspx) or is there another way to go about this.

  • 1
    You don't need to add the WEB API project as reference, need to use HTTP Client object to consume the API Service... and ensure the Web API project is running, for this you need to RUN MULTIPLE project at same time in Visual Studio. – Deepu Madhusoodanan Jul 10 '14 at 18:11
13

Access to Web API controllers and actions are based on urls. So now that they are on separate projects you need to run both projects at the same time to make your API available for MVC project.

and by the way you should enable CORS for your web api project so that you can access it from your MVC project.

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  • So you mean if I run my Web Api project from one visual studio instance, and launch my website from another instance, I will be able to make http calls to my Web Api from my website? Thanks – PersuitOfPerfection Jul 10 '14 at 18:16
  • 3
    @PersuitOfPerfection You don't need multiple instances of Visual Studio open. Right click on your solution, choose Common Properties and then in Startup Project you can specify multiple startup projects. If your api runs on port 4000, your website just hits localhost:4000. – Neil Smith Jul 10 '14 at 18:18
  • yes that's what I mean, but I think you don't need 2 instances of visual studio running. you can run them from one instance. – mohsen dorparasti Jul 10 '14 at 18:18
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    Sucks to be new to an immense program like VS ;) I'm learning a lot from this question! Thanks for the additional info. Really appreciate it – PersuitOfPerfection Jul 10 '14 at 18:19
4

Use the below code to consume web api project

    public async Task <ActionResult> Index()
    {
        using (var client = new HttpClient())
        {
            client.BaseAddress = new Uri("http://localhost:54568/");
            client.DefaultRequestHeaders.Accept.Clear();
            client.DefaultRequestHeaders.Accept.Add(new MediaTypeWithQualityHeaderValue("application/json"));

            HttpResponseMessage response = await client.GetAsync("api/Values/"); //API controller name
            if (response.IsSuccessStatusCode)
            {
                var result = await response.Content.ReadAsAsync<YourReturnDataType>();
                if (result != null)
                    var output = result;
            }
        }

        return View("Return your model here");
    }
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  • 2
    Be careful with this approach: "HttpClient is intended to be instantiated once and reused throughout the life of an application. The following conditions can result in SocketException errors: Creating a new HttpClient instance per request. Server under heavy load." docs.microsoft.com/en-us/aspnet/web-api/overview/advanced/… – Sam Shiles Feb 21 '18 at 13:05
2

It depends what you want to test. If you want to simply test your controller implementations you can create a test project and reference the project, manually instantiate your controllers, and invoke them in your tests.

If you want to do integration tests over the network, you can self-host the web api service. Then install the web api client package Install-Package Microsoft.AspNet.WebApi.Client in the test project and invoke via the client.

Example linking and manual instantiation (from link):

[TestClass]
public class TestSimpleProductController
{
    [TestMethod]
    public void GetAllProducts_ShouldReturnAllProducts()
    {
        var testProducts = GetTestProducts();
        var controller = new SimpleProductController(testProducts);

        var result = controller.GetAllProducts() as List<Product>;
        Assert.AreEqual(testProducts.Count, result.Count);
    }

Example using the web api client (from link):

using (var client = new HttpClient())
{
    client.BaseAddress = new Uri("http://localhost:9000/");
    client.DefaultRequestHeaders.Accept.Clear();
    client.DefaultRequestHeaders.Accept.Add(new                 MediaTypeWithQualityHeaderValue("application/json"));

    // New code:
    HttpResponseMessage response = await client.GetAsync("api/products/1");
    if (response.IsSuccessStatusCode)
    {
        Product product = await response.Content.ReadAsAsync>Product>();
        Console.WriteLine("{0}\t${1}\t{2}", product.Name, product.Price, product.Category);
    }
}

For self hosting the service:

http://www.asp.net/web-api/overview/hosting-aspnet-web-api/use-owin-to-self-host-web-api

For the Web Api client:

Install-Package Microsoft.AspNet.WebApi.Client
| improve this answer | |
  • Thanks for the comment. That is what I have been doing up until now (using test cases manually invoking my methods). As for self-hosting the web api, that is really interesting. Thanks for the link! – PersuitOfPerfection Jul 10 '14 at 18:18
  • It's nice because you can decouple your api testing from the dependent project. – wbennett Jul 10 '14 at 18:34

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