93

I'm try to find a way to determine orphan security groups so I can clean up and get rid of them. Does anyone know of a way to discover unused security groups.

Either through the console or with the command line tools will work (Running command line tools on linux and OSX machines).

  • 3
    My Kingdom for an answer that fully answers this question, without exceptions for long-lived non-Instance objects (RDS, ELBs, ALBs) that can have SGs assigned to them, and doesn't involve 'select all, then delete' scarybad weekend-destroyer approach. :) – Jesse Adelman Jun 21 '18 at 22:11

11 Answers 11

77

Note: this only considers security use in EC2, not other services like RDS. You'll need to do more work to include security groups used outside EC2. The good thing is you can't easily (might not even be possible) to delete active security groups if you miss one associated w/another service.

Using the newer AWS CLI tool, I found an easy way to get what I need:

First, get a list of all security groups

aws ec2 describe-security-groups --query 'SecurityGroups[*].GroupId'  --output text | tr '\t' '\n'

Then get all security groups tied to an instance, then piped to sort then uniq:

aws ec2 describe-instances --query 'Reservations[*].Instances[*].SecurityGroups[*].GroupId' --output text | tr '\t' '\n' | sort | uniq

Then put it together and compare the 2 lists and see what's not being used from the master list:

comm -23  <(aws ec2 describe-security-groups --query 'SecurityGroups[*].GroupId'  --output text | tr '\t' '\n'| sort) <(aws ec2 describe-instances --query 'Reservations[*].Instances[*].SecurityGroups[*].GroupId' --output text | tr '\t' '\n' | sort | uniq)
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    @Erik Yes, I only have a single region and the AWS scripts have their home region set via environmental variables. I'd be interested in seeing a multi-region version of this script. – Ray Apr 15 '15 at 21:28
  • 1
    you may want to add a --filter for your vpc so you dont have to see other default vpc sg – shadowbq Jun 30 '16 at 12:02
  • 2
    A security group may also be in use by an ELB. This command will list the uniq set of security group IDs referenced by ELBs in the default region: aws elb describe-load-balancers --query 'LoadBalancerDescriptions[*].SecurityGroups[*]' --output text | tr '\t' '\n' | sort | uniq – astletron Dec 23 '16 at 15:06
  • 2
    An EC2 security group may also be in use by an RDS instance. This command will list the security group ID's used by RDS instances in the default region: aws rds describe-db-security-groups --query 'DBSecurityGroups[*].EC2SecurityGroups[*].EC2SecurityGroupId' --output text | tr '\t' '\n' | sort | uniq – aharden Mar 30 '17 at 16:55
  • 2
    You can also use aws ec2 describe-network-interfaces --query 'NetworkInterfaces[*].Groups[*].GroupId' --output text| tr '\t' '\n' | sort | uniq to just describe the network interfaces. – Jonathan Nov 17 '17 at 10:07
61

If you select all of your security groups in the EC2 console, then press actions -> Delete Security Groups, a popup will appear telling you that you cannot delete security groups that are attached to instances, other security groups, or network interfaces, and it will list the security groups that you can delete; ie the unused security groups :)

| improve this answer | |
  • 15
    While I must agree, using "select all + delete" is usually not really a good habit. – Balmipour Apr 20 '16 at 18:16
  • 3
    If you are uncertain if it will work you can just make a dummy security group and attach to it something, try deleting it, and see that it won't let you. – NLail Feb 7 '17 at 10:23
  • 2
    You don't need to actually confirm the delete, in the popup it will show you a breakdown of which ones can be deleted (orphan) and which can't. You can then press cancel and then delete the orphan ones. – rjarmstrong Jun 21 '18 at 7:03
  • 4
    What I don't get is this: If the AWS console can offer this information when you do this scary.maneuver, why don't they share how to do the same thing via the API? Its not like this isn't something that is likely needed in brown field environments... – Jesse Adelman Nov 4 '18 at 0:54
  • 1
    be brave :: do it – zanuka Nov 21 '18 at 22:59
29

This is the sample code written in boto (Python SDK for AWS) to list the Security Group against number of instances it is associated with.

You may use this logic to obtain the same in command line as well

Boto Code

import boto
ec2 = boto.connect_ec2()
sgs = ec2.get_all_security_groups()
for sg in sgs:
    print sg.name, len(sg.instances())

Output

Security-Group-1 0
Security-Group-2 1
Security-Group-3 0
Security-Group-4 3
| improve this answer | |
  • Nice and easy! Thanks – Chris Koston Oct 20 '15 at 16:03
  • 6
    well, yes, but what abou elbs? – Ilja May 17 '16 at 19:24
  • Also note that this includes running instances only. You can't delete a SG which is linked to a stopped instance either. – AgDude Jul 14 '16 at 15:35
  • 6
    This ignores interfaces from services like RDS. RDS owns the instance, but you own the ENI. I think ElasticSearch and ELB work similarly and wouldn't show up with this script – rajat banerjee Nov 14 '17 at 4:14
6

After about a year of unaudited use, I found it necessary to audit my AWS EC2 security groups and clean up legacy, unused groups.

This was a daunting task to perform via the web GUI, so I looked to the AWS CLI to make the task easier. I found a start on how to do this at StackOverflow, but it was far from complete. So I decided to write my own script. I used the AWS CLI, MySQL and some “Bash-foo” to perform the following:

  1. Get a list of all EC2 security groups. I store the group-id, group-name and description in a tabled called “groups” in a MySQL database called aws_security_groups on the localhost. The total number of groups found is reported to the user.

  2. Get a list of all security groups associated with each of the following services and exclude them from the table: EC2 Istances EC2 Elastic Load Balancers AWS RDS Instances AWS OpsWorks (shouldn’t be removed per Amazon) Default security groups (Can’t be deleted) ElastiCache

For each service I report a count of the number of groups left in the table after the exclusion is complete.

  1. Finally I display the group-id, group-name and description for the groups that are left. These are the “unused” groups that need to be audited and/or deleted. I’ve found that SG’s between instances and Elastic Load Balancers (ELBs) often refer to each other. It’s best practice to do some manual investigation to ensure they are truly not in use prior to removing the cross references and deleting the security groups. But my script at least pares this down to something mor manageable.

NOTES: 1. You will want to create a file to store your MySQL host, username and password and point the $DBCONFIG variable to it. It should be structured like this:

[mysql]
host=your-mysql-server-host.com
user=your-mysql-user
password=your-mysql-user-password
  1. You can change the name of the database if you wish – make sure to change the $DB variable in the script

Let me know if you find this useful or have any comments,fixes or enhancements.

Here is the script.

#!/bin/bash
# Initialize Variables
DBCONFIG="--defaults-file=mysql-defaults.cnf"
DB="aws_security_groups"
SGLOOP=0
EC2LOOP=0
ELBLOOP=0
RDSLOOP=0
DEFAULTLOOP=0
OPSLOOP=0
CACHELOOP=0
DEL_GROUP=""

# Function to report back # of rows
function Rows {
    ROWS=`echo "select count(*) from groups" | mysql $DBCONFIG --skip-column-names $DB`
#   echo -e "Excluding $1 Security Groups.\nGroups Left to audit: "$ROWS
    echo -e $ROWS" groups left after Excluding $1 Security Groups."
}


# Empty the table
echo -e "delete from groups where groupid is not null" | mysql $DBCONFIG $DB

# Get all Security Groups
aws ec2 describe-security-groups --query "SecurityGroups[*].[GroupId,GroupName,Description]" --output text > /tmp/security_group_audit.txt
while IFS=$'\t' read -r -a myArray
do
    if [ $SGLOOP -eq 0 ];
    then
        VALUES="(\""${myArray[0]}"\",\""${myArray[1]}"\",\""${myArray[2]}"\")"
    else
        VALUES=$VALUES",(\""${myArray[0]}"\",\""${myArray[1]}"\",\""${myArray[2]}"\")"
    fi
    let SGLOOP="$SGLOOP + 1"
done < /tmp/security_group_audit.txt
echo -e "insert into groups (groupid, groupname, description) values $VALUES" | mysql $DBCONFIG $DB
echo -e $SGLOOP" security groups total."


# Exclude Security Groups assigned to Instances
for groupId in `aws ec2 describe-instances --output json | jq -r ".Reservations[].Instances[].SecurityGroups[].GroupId" | sort | uniq`
do
    if [ $EC2LOOP -eq 0 ];
    then
        DEL_GROUP="'$groupId'"
    else
        DEL_GROUP=$DEL_GROUP",'$groupId'"
    fi
    let EC2LOOP="$EC2LOOP + 1"
done
echo -e "delete from groups where groupid in ($DEL_GROUP)" | mysql $DBCONFIG $DB
Rows "EC2 Instance"
DEL_GROUP=""


# Exclude groups assigned to Elastic Load Balancers
for elbGroupId in `aws elb describe-load-balancers --output json | jq -c -r ".LoadBalancerDescriptions[].SecurityGroups" | tr -d "\"[]\"" | sort | uniq`
do
    if [ $ELBLOOP -eq 0 ];
    then
        DEL_GROUP="'$elbGroupId'"
    else
        DEL_GROUP=$DEL_GROUP",'$elbGroupId'"
    fi
    let ELBLOOP="$ELBLOOP + 1"
done
    echo -e "delete from groups where groupid in ($DEL_GROUP)" | mysql $DBCONFIG $DB
Rows "Elastic Load Balancer"
DEL_GROUP=""


# Exclude groups assigned to RDS
for RdsGroupId in `aws rds describe-db-instances --output json | jq -c -r ".DBInstances[].VpcSecurityGroups[].VpcSecurityGroupId" | sort | uniq`
do
    if [ $RDSLOOP -eq 0 ];
    then
        DEL_GROUP="'$RdsGroupId'"
    else
        DEL_GROUP=$DEL_GROUP",'$RdsGroupId'"
    fi
    let RDSLOOP="$RDSLOOP + 1"
done
    echo -e "delete from groups where groupid in ($DEL_GROUP)" | mysql $DBCONFIG $DB
Rows "RDS Instances"
DEL_GROUP=""

# Exclude groups assigned to OpsWorks
for OpsGroupId in `echo -e "select groupid from groups where groupname like \"AWS-OpsWorks%\"" | mysql $DBCONFIG $DB`
do
    if [ $OPSLOOP -eq 0 ];
    then
        DEL_GROUP="'$OpsGroupId'"
    else
        DEL_GROUP=$DEL_GROUP",'$OpsGroupId'"
    fi
    let OPSLOOP="$OPSLOOP + 1"
done
echo -e "delete from groups where groupid in ($DEL_GROUP)" | mysql $DBCONFIG $DB
Rows "OpsWorks"
DEL_GROUP=""

# Exclude default groups (can't be deleted)
for DefaultGroupId in `echo -e "select groupid from groups where groupname like \"default%\"" | mysql $DBCONFIG $DB`
do
    if [ $DEFAULTLOOP -eq 0 ];
    then
        DEL_GROUP="'$DefaultGroupId'"
    else
        DEL_GROUP=$DEL_GROUP",'$DefaultGroupId'"
    fi
    let DEFAULTLOOP="$DEFAULTLOOP + 1"
done
echo -e "delete from groups where groupid in ($DEL_GROUP)" | mysql $DBCONFIG $DB
Rows "Default"
DEL_GROUP=""

# Exclude Elasticache groups
for CacheGroupId in `aws elasticache describe-cache-clusters --output json | jq -r ".CacheClusters[].SecurityGroups[].SecurityGroupId" | sort | uniq`
do
    if [ $CACHELOOP -eq 0 ];
    then
        DEL_GROUP="'$CacheGroupId'"
    else
        DEL_GROUP=$DEL_GROUP",'$CacheGroupId'"
    fi
    let CACHELOOP="$CACHELOOP + 1"
done
echo -e "delete from groups where groupid in ($DEL_GROUP)" | mysql $DBCONFIG $DB
Rows "ElastiCache"

# Display Security Groups left to audit / delete
echo "select * from groups order by groupid" | mysql $DBCONFIG $DB | sed 's/groupid\t/groupid\t\t/'

And here is the sql to create the database.

-- MySQL dump 10.13  Distrib 5.5.41, for debian-linux-gnu (x86_64)
--
-- Host:  localhost   Database: aws_security_groups
-- ------------------------------------------------------
-- Server version   5.5.40-log

/*!40101 SET @OLD_CHARACTER_SET_CLIENT=@@CHARACTER_SET_CLIENT */;
/*!40101 SET @OLD_CHARACTER_SET_RESULTS=@@CHARACTER_SET_RESULTS */;
/*!40101 SET @OLD_COLLATION_CONNECTION=@@COLLATION_CONNECTION */;
/*!40101 SET NAMES utf8 */;
/*!40103 SET @OLD_TIME_ZONE=@@TIME_ZONE */;
/*!40103 SET TIME_ZONE='+00:00' */;
/*!40014 SET @OLD_UNIQUE_CHECKS=@@UNIQUE_CHECKS, UNIQUE_CHECKS=0 */;
/*!40014 SET @OLD_FOREIGN_KEY_CHECKS=@@FOREIGN_KEY_CHECKS, FOREIGN_KEY_CHECKS=0 */;
/*!40101 SET @OLD_SQL_MODE=@@SQL_MODE, SQL_MODE='NO_AUTO_VALUE_ON_ZERO' */;
/*!40111 SET @OLD_SQL_NOTES=@@SQL_NOTES, SQL_NOTES=0 */;

--
-- Table structure for table `groups`
--

DROP TABLE IF EXISTS `groups`;
/*!40101 SET @saved_cs_client     = @@character_set_client */;
/*!40101 SET character_set_client = utf8 */;
CREATE TABLE `groups` (
  `groupid` varchar(12) DEFAULT NULL,
  `groupname` varchar(200) DEFAULT NULL,
  `description` varchar(200) DEFAULT NULL
) ENGINE=InnoDB DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1;
/*!40101 SET character_set_client = @saved_cs_client */;

--
-- Dumping data for table `groups`
--

LOCK TABLES `groups` WRITE;
/*!40000 ALTER TABLE `groups` DISABLE KEYS */;
/*!40000 ALTER TABLE `groups` ENABLE KEYS */;
UNLOCK TABLES;
/*!40103 SET TIME_ZONE=@OLD_TIME_ZONE */;

/*!40101 SET SQL_MODE=@OLD_SQL_MODE */;
/*!40014 SET FOREIGN_KEY_CHECKS=@OLD_FOREIGN_KEY_CHECKS */;
/*!40014 SET UNIQUE_CHECKS=@OLD_UNIQUE_CHECKS */;
/*!40101 SET CHARACTER_SET_CLIENT=@OLD_CHARACTER_SET_CLIENT */;
/*!40101 SET CHARACTER_SET_RESULTS=@OLD_CHARACTER_SET_RESULTS */;
/*!40101 SET COLLATION_CONNECTION=@OLD_COLLATION_CONNECTION */;
/*!40111 SET SQL_NOTES=@OLD_SQL_NOTES */;

-- Dump completed on 2015-01-27 16:07:44
| improve this answer | |
3

A boto example printing the Group IDs and Names only of the security groups that have no current instances.

It also shows how to specify which region you are concerned with.

import boto
import boto.ec2
EC2_REGION='ap-southeast-2'
ec2region = boto.ec2.get_region(EC2_REGION)
ec2 = boto.connect_ec2(region=ec2region)
sgs = ec2.get_all_security_groups()
for sg in sgs:
    if len(sg.instances()) == 0:
        print ("{0}\t{1}".format(sg.id, sg.name))

To confirm which security groups are still being used you should reverse or remove the if len(sg.instances()) == 0 test and print the len(sg.instances()) value out.

E.g.

print ("{0}\t{1}\t{2} instances".format(sg.id, sg.name, len(sg.instances())))
| improve this answer | |
3

Using the node.js AWS SDK I can confirm that AWS doesn't allow you to delete security groups that are in use. I wrote a script that simply tries to delete all groups and gracefully handles the errors. This works for classic and the modern VPC. The error message can be seen below.

Err { [DependencyViolation: resource sg-12345678 has a dependent object]
  message: 'resource sg-12345678 has a dependent object',
  code: 'DependencyViolation',
  time: Mon Dec 07 2015 12:12:43 GMT-0500 (EST),
  statusCode: 400,
  retryable: false,
  retryDelay: 30 }
| improve this answer | |
2

Among other functions, both ScoutSuite and Prowler report unused EC2 Security Groups. Both are open source.

| improve this answer | |
1

To the SGs attached to the network interfaces:

By name:

aws ec2 describe-network-interfaces --output text --query NetworkInterfaces[*].Groups[*].GroupName | tr -d '\r' | tr "\t" "\n" | sort | uniq

By id:

aws ec2 describe-network-interfaces --output text --query NetworkInterfaces[*].Groups[*].GroupId | tr -d '\r' | tr "\t" "\n" | sort | uniq
| improve this answer | |
0

There's a tool in the AWS marketplace that makes this a lot easier. It shows you which groups are attached/detached for easy deletion, but it also compares your VPC Flow Logs against the security group rules and shows you which SG rules are in use or unused. AWS posted an ELK-stack solution to do this, but it was ridiculously complex.

Here's the tool, and a disclaimer that I worked on it. But I hope you all find it pertinent: https://www.piasoftware.net/single-post/2018/04/24/VIDEO-Watch-as-we-clean-up-EC2-security-groups-in-just-a-few-minutes

| improve this answer | |
0

Unfortunately the chosen answer is not as accurate as I need (I've tried to investigate the why, but I've preferred to implement it).
If I check ALL NetworkInterfaces, looking for attachments to any SecurityGroup, It gets me partial results. If I check only on EC2Instances, it gets me back partial results as well.

So that's my approach to the problem:

  1. I get ALL EC2 SecurityGroups -> all_secgrp
  2. I get ALL EC2 Instances -> all_instances
  3. For each Instance, I get all SecurityGroups attached to it
    1. I remove from all_secgrp each of these SecurityGroup (because attached)
  4. For each SecurityGroup, I check an association with any NetworkInterfaces (using the filter function and filtering using that security-group-id)
    1. IF no association is found, I remove the security-group from all_secgrp

Attached you can see a snippet of code. Don't complain for efficiency, but try to optimize it if you want.

all_secgrp = list(ec2_connector.security_groups.all())
all_instances = ec2_connector.instances.all()

for single_instance in all_instances:
    instance_secgrp = ec2_connector.Instance(single_instance.id).security_groups
    for single_sec_grp in instance_secgrp:
        if ec2.SecurityGroup(id=single_sec_grp['GroupId']) in all_secgrp:
            all_secgrp.remove(ec2.SecurityGroup(id=single_sec_grp['GroupId']))

all_secgrp_detached_tmp = all_secgrp[:]
for single_secgrp in all_secgrp_detached_tmp:
    try:
        print(single_secgrp.id)
        if len(list(ec2_connector.network_interfaces.filter(Filters=[{'Name': 'group-id', 'Values': [single_secgrp.id]}]))) > 0:
            all_secgrp.remove(single_secgrp)
    except Exception:
        all_secgrp.remove(single_secgrp)

return all_secgrp_detached  
| improve this answer | |
0

This is a difficult problem, if you have security groups that reference other security groups in the rules. If so, you'll have to resolve DependencyErrors, which is not trivial.

If you are only using IP addresses, then this solution will work, after you create a boto3 client:

# pull all security groups from all vpcs in the given profile and region and save as a set
all_sgs = {sg['GroupId'] for sg in client.describe_security_groups()['SecurityGroups']}

# create a new set for all of the security groups that are currently in use
in_use = set()

# cycle through the ENIs and add all found security groups to the in_use set
for eni in client.describe_network_interfaces()['NetworkInterfaces']:
    for group in eni['Groups']:
        in_use.add(group['GroupId'])

unused_security_groups = all_sgs - in_use

for security_group in unused_security_groups:
    try:
        response = client.delete_security_group(GroupId=security_group)
    except ClientError as e:
        if e.response['Error']['Code'] == 'DependencyViolation':
            print('EC2/Security Group Dependencies Exist')
    else:
        print('Unexpected error: {}'.format(e))
| improve this answer | |
  • This won't cover SGs used by RDS – alexandernst Feb 10 '19 at 18:13

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