5
I need to "Find the minimal positive integer not occurring in a given sequence. "
  A[0] = 1    
  A[1] = 3    
  A[2] = 6
  A[3] = 4    
  A[4] = 1    
  A[5] = 2, the function should return 5.

Assume that:

        N is an integer within the range [1..100,000];
        each element of array A is an integer within the range [−2,147,483,648..2,147,483,647].

I wrote the code in codility, but for many cases it did not worked and the performance test gives 0 %. Please help me out, where I am wrong.

    class Solution {
    public int solution(int[] A) {

    if(A.Length ==0) return -1;
    int value = A[0];
    int min = A.Min();
    int max = A.Max();
    for (int j = min+1; j < max; j++)
    {
      if (!A.Contains(j))
      {
          value = j;
          if(value > 0)
          {
             break;
          }
      }
    }

    if(value > 0)
    {
      return value;
    }
    else return 1;
  }
}

The codility gives error with all except the example, positive and negative only values.

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  • Why don't your order your collection and start from base to find which is the number which is missing. – Nikhil Agrawal Jul 11 '14 at 5:23
  • @NikhilAgrawal means ? didnt got you ? – user3739443 Jul 11 '14 at 5:26
  • Yea just sort the array, start from index 1, and test id A[i] == A[i-1] + 1, that should get the index of the missing one. That's if I understand the question correctly – 3dd Jul 11 '14 at 5:27
  • @3dd, your condition will also fail if there's 2 equal values. Also, there's a faster solution than this, I won't be posting it here – Zruty Jul 11 '14 at 5:29
  • Something to think about re: performance: What do you think Min, Max and Contains are doing? I'm betting loop over everything in the array. – Evan Trimboli Jul 11 '14 at 5:29

21 Answers 21

12

Edit: Added detail to answer your actual question more directly.

"Please help me out, where I am wrong."

In terms of correctness: Consider A = {7,2,5,6,3}. The correct output, given the contents of A, is 1, but our algorithm would fail to detect this since A.Min() would return 2 and we would start looping from 3 onward. In this case, we would return 4 instead; since it's the next missing value.

Same goes for something like A = {14,15,13}. The minimal missing positive integer here is again 1 and, since all the values from 13-15 are present, the value variable will retain its initial value of value=A[0] which would be 14.

In terms of performance: Consider what A.Min(), A.Max() and A.Contains() are doing behind the scenes; each one of these is looping through A in its entirety and in the case of Contains, we are calling it repeatedly for every value between the Min() and the lowest positive integer we can find. This will take us far beyond the specified O(N) performance that Codility is looking for.

By contrast, here's the simplest version I can think of that should score 100% on Codility. Notice that we only loop through A once and that we take advantage of a Dictionary which lets us use ContainsKey; a much faster method that does not require looping through the whole collection to find a value.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;

class Solution {
    public int solution(int[] A) {

        // the minimum possible answer is 1
        int result = 1; 
        // let's keep track of what we find
        Dictionary<int,bool> found = new Dictionary<int,bool>();

        // loop through the given array  
        for(int i=0;i<A.Length;i++) {
            // if we have a positive integer that we haven't found before
            if(A[i] > 0 && !found.ContainsKey(A[i])) {
                // record the fact that we found it
                found.Add(A[i], true);
            }
        }

        // crawl through what we found starting at 1
        while(found.ContainsKey(result)) {
            // look for the next number
            result++;
        }

        // return the smallest positive number that we couldn't find.
        return result;
    }
}
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  • Your solution scored 100% in Codility test :-) – shashwat Dec 28 '18 at 12:26
  • very easy-to-understand solution - perfect! – Ali Feb 4 at 18:51
8

The simplest solution that scored perfect score was:

public int solution(int[] A)
{
    int flag = 1;

    A = A.OrderBy(x => x).ToArray();

    for (int i = 0; i < A.Length; i++)
    {
        if (A[i] <= 0)
            continue;
        else if (A[i] == flag)
        {
            flag++;
        }

    }

    return flag;
}
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  • Great answer! One suggestion I would make is using Array.Sort() instead of .OrderBy just to save some memory. – Justin Mar 3 at 3:28
5

A tiny version of another 100% with C#

using System.Linq;

class Solution
{
    public int solution(int[] A)
    {
        // write your code in C# 6.0 with .NET 4.5 (Mono)
        var i = 0;
        return A.Where(a => a > 0).Distinct().OrderBy(a => a).Any(a => a != (i = i + 1)) ? i : i + 1;
    }
}
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2

The Simplest solution for c# would be :

int value = 1;

        int min = A.Min();
        int max = A.Max();
        if (A.Length == 0) return value = 1;

        if (min < 0 && max < 0) return value = 1;


        List<int> range = Enumerable.Range(1, max).ToList();
        List<int> current = A.ToList();

        List<int> valid = range.Except(current).ToList();

        if (valid.Count() == 0)
        {
            max++;
           return value = max;
        }
        else
        {
          return  value = valid.Min();
        }

considering that the array should start from 1 or if it needs to start from the minimum value than the Enumerable.range should start from Min

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  • Consider what Enumerable.Range(1, max) will do for a value of A like [1,2,1e9]. You would end up with a pretty big list to process such a small input. – Bill Sourour Jun 6 '18 at 4:02
2

Fastest C# solution so far for [1_000_000...1_000_000].

    public int solution(int[] array)
    {
        HashSet<int> found = new HashSet<int>();
        for (int i = 0; i < array.Length; i++)
        {
            if (array[i] > 0)
            {
                found.Add(array[i]);
            }
        }

        int result = 1;
        while (found.Contains(result))
        {
            result++;
        }

        return result;
    }
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1

MissingInteger solution in C

int solution(int A[], int N) {

   int i=0,r[N];

   memset(r,0,(sizeof(r)));

   for(i=0;i<N;i++)
   {
       if(( A[i] > 0) && (A[i] <= N)) r[A[i]-1]=A[i];
   }

   for(i=0;i<N;i++)
   {
       if( r[i] != (i+1)) return (i+1);
   }

   return (N+1);
}
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1

Got an 100% score with this solution: https://app.codility.com/demo/results/trainingUFKJSB-T8P/

   public int MissingInteger(int[] A)
    {
        A = A.Where(a => a > 0).Distinct().OrderBy(c => c).ToArray();
        if (A.Length== 0)
        {
            return 1;
        }
        for (int i = 0; i < A.Length; i++)
        {
            //Console.WriteLine(i + "=>" + A[i]);
            if (i + 1 != A[i])
            {
                return i + 1;
            }
        }

        return A.Max() + 1;
    }
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1

Got 100% - C# Efficient Solution

     public int solution (int [] A){
        int len = A.Length;
        HashSet<int> realSet = new HashSet<int>();
        HashSet<int> perfectSet = new HashSet<int>();

        int i = 0;
        while ( i < len)
        {
            realSet.Add(A[i]);   //convert array to set to get rid of duplicates, order int's
            perfectSet.Add(i + 1);  //create perfect set so can find missing int
            i++;
        }
        perfectSet.Add(i + 1);

        if (realSet.All(item => item < 0))
            return 1;

        int notContains = 
         perfectSet.Except(realSet).Where(item=>item!=0).FirstOrDefault();
        return notContains;
}
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1

A simple solution that scored 100% with C#

int Solution(int[] A)
    {            
        var A2 = Enumerable.Range(1, A.Length + 1);
        return A2.Except(A).First();
    }
| |
1
class Solution {
  public int solution(int[] a) {
    int smallestPositive = 1;
    while(a.Contains(smallestPositive)) {
      smallestPositive++;
    }
    return smallestPositive;
  }
}
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  • 2
    While this code may answer the question, providing additional context regarding why and/or how this code answers the question improves its long-term value. – β.εηοιτ.βε May 24 at 21:21
0
public int solution(int[] A) {
        // write your code in Java SE 8
        Set<Integer> elements = new TreeSet<Integer>();
        long lookFor = 1;
        for (int i = 0; i < A.length; i++) {
            elements.add(A[i]);
        }
        for (Integer integer : elements) {
            if (integer == lookFor)
                lookFor += 1;
        }
        return (int) lookFor;
    }
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0

My solution for it:

public static int solution()
    {
        var A = new[] { -1000000, 1000000 }; // You can try with different integers

        A = A.OrderBy(i => i).ToArray(); // We sort the array first

        if (A.Length == 1) // if there is only one item in the array
        {
            if (A[0]<0 || A[0] > 1)
                return 1;
            if (A[0] == 1)
                return 2;
        }
        else // if there are more than one item in the array
        {
            for (var i = 0; i < A.Length - 1; i++)
            {
                if (A[i] >= 1000000) continue; // if it's bigger than 1M
                if (A[i] < 0 || (A[i] + 1) >= (A[i + 1])) continue; //if it's smaller than 0, if the next integer is bigger or equal to next integer in the sequence continue searching.
                if (1 < A[0]) return 1;
                return A[i] + 1;
            }
        }

        if (1 < A[0] || A[A.Length - 1] + 1 == 0 || A[A.Length - 1] + 1 > 1000000)
            return 1;
        return A[A.Length-1] +1;
    }
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0
class Solution {
    public int solution(int[] A) {
    int size=A.length;
    int small,big,temp;
    for (int i=0;i<size;i++){
        for(int j=0;j<size;j++){
            if(A[i]<A[j]){
                temp=A[j];
                A[j]=A[i];
                A[i]=temp;
            }
        }


    }   

    int z=1;
    for(int i=0;i<size;i++){
        if(z==A[i]){
            z++;
        }

        //System.out.println(a[i]);
    }
    return z;       

    }





enter code here

}
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0

In C# you can solve the problem by making use of built in library functions. How ever the performance is low for very large integers

public int solution(int[] A)
{
    var numbers = Enumerable.Range(1, Math.Abs(A.Max())+1).ToArray();
    return numbers.Except(A).ToArray()[0];
}

Let me know if you find a better solution performance wise

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0

C# - MissingInteger

Find the smallest missing integer between 1 - 1000.000.

Assumptions of the OP take place

TaskScore/Correctness/Performance: 100%

using System;
using System.Linq;

namespace TestConsole
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            var A = new int[] { -122, -5, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 }; // 8
            var B = new int[] { 1, 3, 6, 4, 1, 2 }; // 5
            var C = new int[] { -1, -3 };  // 1
            var D = new int[] { -3 };  // 1
            var E = new int[] { 1 };  // 2
            var F = new int[] { 1000000 };  // 1


            var x = new int[][] { A, B, C, D, E, F };

            x.ToList().ForEach((arr) =>
            {
                var s = new Solution();
                Console.WriteLine(s.solution(arr));
            });

            Console.ReadLine();
        }
    }
 
    // ANSWER/SOLUTION
    class Solution
    {
        public int solution(int[] A)
        {
            // clean up array for negatives and duplicates, do sort
            A = A.Where(entry => entry > 0).Distinct().OrderBy(it => it).ToArray();
            int lowest = 1, aLength = A.Length, highestIndex = aLength - 1;

            for (int i = 0; i < aLength; i++)
            {
                var currInt = A[i];
                if (currInt > lowest) return lowest;
                if (i == highestIndex) return ++lowest;
                lowest++;
            }
            return 1;
        }
    }
}
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0

I tried to use recursion in C# instead of sorting, because I thought it would show more coding skill to do it that way, but on the scaling tests it didn't preform well on large performance tests. Suppose it's best to just do the easy way.

class Solution {
public int lowest=1;
public int solution(int[] A) {
    // write your code in C# 6.0 with .NET 4.5 (Mono)
    if (A.Length < 1)
        return 1;
     for (int i=0; i < A.Length; i++){
         if (A[i]==lowest){
            lowest++;
            solution(A);
         }
     }

     return lowest;  
    }
}
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  • Actually, the more you can simplify your code, the more skilled you are. – Slobodan Antonijević Aug 23 '19 at 8:44
0

Here is my solution in javascript

function solution(A) {
    // write your code in JavaScript (Node.js 8.9.4)
    let result = 1;
    let haveFound = {}
    let len = A.length
    for (let i=0;i<len;i++) {
        haveFound[`${A[i]}`] = true
    }
    while(haveFound[`${result}`]) {
        result++
    }
    return result
}
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0

Well, this is a new winner now. At least on C# and my laptop. It's 1.5-2 times faster than the previous champion and 3-10 times faster, than most of the other solutions. The feature (or a bug?) of this solution is that it uses only basic data types. Also 100/100 on Codility.

public int Solution(int[] A)
{
    bool[] B = new bool[(A.Length + 1)];
    for (int i = 0; i < A.Length; i++)
    {
        if ((A[i] > 0) && (A[i] <= A.Length))
            B[A[i]] = true;
    }

    for (int i = 1; i < B.Length; i++)
    {
        if (!B[i])
            return i;
    }

    return A.Length + 1;
}
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0
public class Solution {
    public int solution( int[] A ) {
        return Arrays.stream( A )
                     .filter( n -> n > 0 )
                     .sorted()
                     .reduce( 0, ( a, b ) -> ( ( b - a ) > 1 ) ? a : b ) + 1;
    }
}

It seemed easiest to just filter out the negative numbers. Then sort the stream. And then reduce it to come to an answer. It's a bit of a functional approach, but it got a 100/100 test score.

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-1

You should just use a HashSet as its look up time is also constant instead of a dictionary. The code is less and cleaner.

public int solution (int [] A){

    int answer = 1;
    var set = new HashSet<int>(A);
    while (set.Contains(answer)){
       answer++;
    }

    return answer;
}
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-1

This snippet should work correctly.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;

public class Program
{
    public static void Main()
    {
     int result = 1;

     List<int> lst = new List<int>();
     lst.Add(1);
     lst.Add(2);
     lst.Add(3);
     lst.Add(18);
     lst.Add(4);
     lst.Add(1000);
     lst.Add(-1);
     lst.Add(-1000);

     lst.Sort();

     foreach(int curVal in lst)
     {
        if(curVal <=0)
            result=1;
        else if(!lst.Contains(curVal+1))
        {
            result = curVal + 1 ;
        }

        Console.WriteLine(result);
     }
    }
}
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  • I don't see a public int solution(int[] A). How does this answer where [am I] wrong? (Then again, the approach is somewhat original.) – greybeard Sep 5 '19 at 20:10

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