75

Python has an interesting for statement which lets you specify an else clause.

In a construct like this one:

for i in foo:
  if bar(i):
    break
else:
  baz()

the else clause is executed after the for, but only if the for terminates normally (not by a break).

I wondered if there was an equivalent in C++? Can I use for ... else?

10
  • 4
    It's an interesting idea that comes up every now and then. Out of curiosity, how often is such a construction used in real code?
    – Kerrek SB
    Jul 11, 2014 at 9:05
  • 5
    @KerrekSB This is the real question. When I started learning Python I kind of found this to be trivial and confusing to beginners at best; I couldn't find any pressing requirement for this construct.
    – legends2k
    Jul 11, 2014 at 9:08
  • 2
    @m.wasowski: really? Usually the standard early return works just fine for find-like algorithms, with no need for a separate "loop complete" block.
    – Kerrek SB
    Jul 11, 2014 at 17:53
  • 1
    I do like this construction, and I made a search to see If I could find some use cases of it in my code to answer @KerrekSB , but i need to post it as a answer because comments are not enough
    – agomcas
    Dec 16, 2015 at 6:37
  • 5
    @agomcas: I have since been convinced that this construction is useful. The reasoning is this: All three of if (c), while (c) and for (...; c; ...) evaluate c, but at present only the first one lets you access the result of this expression. The other two are throwing away this information, which violates the principle that you should not throw away results that were obtained as part of a computation.
    – Kerrek SB
    Dec 16, 2015 at 9:54

14 Answers 14

39
+100

If doesn't mind using goto also can be done in following way. This one saves from extra if check and higher scope variable declaration.

for(int i = 0; i < foo; i++)
     if(bar(i))
         goto m_label;
baz();

m_label:
...
19
  • 3
    @MatthiasB As far as I understand question is not about what to use, instead it is about the possible implementations in C++.
    – ifyalciner
    Jul 11, 2014 at 9:51
  • 6
    @MatthiasB And also I don't think that 'goto' is outdated. Because there are still fields where you need to omit extra 'if' checks and declarations for performance and memory considerations, while still programming in C++.
    – ifyalciner
    Jul 11, 2014 at 10:01
  • 5
    The goto part isn't that bad. That's what I'd use in this situation. I think it is actually more readable than the flag-based solution. Dec 10, 2015 at 19:20
  • 4
    If we consider language equivalency, then this is the only valid answer. Python does not have gotos, while C++ has, and all other examples, such as using return, a temporary variable and break, or exceptions can be done with Python. Plus, this case (for else) as well as breaking out of a nested loop are probably the two only cases of valid applications of goto in C++.
    – 0kcats
    Dec 15, 2015 at 14:49
  • 5
    goto is well defined and often the most comprehensible (i.e. best maintainable) solution for complex loop handling. This solution has my vote (I would have given a similar one).
    – kamikaze
    Dec 15, 2015 at 16:02
37

A simpler way to express your actual logic is with std::none_of:

if (std::none_of(std::begin(foo), std::end(foo), bar))
    baz();

If the range proposal for C++17 gets accepted, hopefully this will simplify to:

if (std::none_of(foo, bar)) baz();
3
  • 11
    Not completely equivalent. For example, it does not allow modification of the elements of the container by the "bar". Not to mention, that it made me (a C++ dev) go look it up in the help, while the the original OP python sample I had no problem understanding immediately. The stl turns into a mud pile.
    – 0kcats
    Dec 16, 2015 at 3:48
  • 2
    I was referring to the help page here: cplusplus.com/reference/algorithm/none_of or here en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/algorithm/all_any_none_of. Both say that the predicate shall not modify the argument.
    – 0kcats
    Dec 16, 2015 at 6:06
  • @0kcats: hmmm... 25.1/8 does say "The function object pred shall not apply any non-constant function through the dereferenced iterator.", so you're right. Interesting! Related discussion here. Cheers Dec 16, 2015 at 6:37
14

Yes you can achieve the same effect by:

auto it = std::begin(foo);
for (; it != std::end(foo); ++it)
     if(bar(*it))
         break;
if(it == std::end(foo))
    baz();
7
  • 2
    Note that this counts up from 0 to foo while the Python loop goes through the elements of the iterable foo. Probably easy to adjust though (compare to end()).
    – user395760
    Jul 11, 2014 at 9:02
  • 3
    No. The Python loop doesn't count at all. i probably never is an integer. It's more like C++11 for (auto i : foo).
    – user395760
    Jul 11, 2014 at 9:04
  • 3
    for(auto it = begin(something); it != end(something); ++i) ... if (it == end(something))`... Also please remember, that everytime you do postfix incrementation unecessary, a kitten dies.
    – m.wasowski
    Jul 11, 2014 at 9:07
  • 1
    @Joeytje50 i++ can be significantly slower, as it involves creating a new object; it is a bad habit to use it and you won't find it in decent code in place where ++i can be used instead. Personally, it forces me unecessarilly to slow down and think if there is was a reason to use it, or is it just sloppy code. Even if for a second, it might be annoying.
    – m.wasowski
    Nov 30, 2014 at 22:17
  • 1
    @Joeytje50 mind that this is answer for a different programming language. For example, iterators are not primitive types like int. Also see comments below, you will find all the reasons why ++i should be used as default. And IMHO, for sake of consistency, the same should be used for primitive types, like int.
    – m.wasowski
    Nov 30, 2014 at 22:34
13

This is my rough implementation in C++:

bool other = true;
for (int i = 0; i > foo; i++) {
     if (bar[i] == 7) {
          other = false;
          break;
     }
} if(other)
     baz();
3
  • Whoops, fixed the issue.
    – Easton
    Jul 11, 2014 at 9:07
  • 2
    +1 because I think this solution most clearly states the intent. Jul 11, 2014 at 9:28
  • 7
    Why i > foo? Shouldn't it be i < foo?
    – ferdynator
    Dec 18, 2015 at 9:58
13

You could use a lambda function for this:

[&](){
  for (auto i : foo) {
    if (bar(i)) {
      // early return, to skip the "else:" section.
      return;
    }
  }
  // foo is exhausted, with no item satisfying bar(). i.e., "else:"
  baz();
}();

This should behave exactly like Python's "for..else", and it has some advantages over the other solutions:

  • It's a true drop-in replacement for "for..else": the "for" section can have side effects (unlike none_of, whose predicate must not modify its argument), and it has access to the outer scope.
  • It's more readable than defining a special macro.
  • It doesn't require any special flag variables.

But... I'd use the clunky flag variable, myself.

4

I am not aware of an elegant way to accomplish this in C/C++ (not involving a flag variable). The suggested other options are much more horrible than that...

To answer @Kerrek SB about real life usages, I found a few in my code (simplified snippets)

Example 1: typical find/fail

for item in elements:
    if condition(item):
        do_stuff(item)
        break
else: #for else
    raise Exception("No valid item in elements")

Example 2: limited number of attempts

for retrynum in range(max_retries):
    try:
        attempt_operation()
    except SomeException:
        continue
    else:
        break
else: #for else
    raise Exception("Operation failed {} times".format(max_retries))
7
  • The first example can be replaced with an if statement using python's built-ins any and map or an iterator comprehension. Dec 17, 2015 at 14:01
  • @agomcas: this is very interesting, as is the contrast with equivalent C++, e.g.: for (int retrynum = 0; ; ++retrynum) { try { attempt_operation(); } catch (const SomeException&) { if (retrynum == max_retries) throw ...; } }. Not sure which I prefer. Dec 18, 2015 at 5:04
  • @АндрейБеньковский but I believe with the any() construction there is not way to recover which element fulfilled the condition. In the for...else case you have it stored in item and may do something else with it.
    – agomcas
    Dec 18, 2015 at 5:25
  • @agomcas I continued my experiments. link. I'm not sure which of two solutions is more readable. Dec 18, 2015 at 6:17
  • @agomcas A bit more improved version: melpon.org/wandbox/permlink/xiQBiPYY9zBV0ceY Dec 18, 2015 at 6:25
3

Something like:

auto it = foo.begin(), end = foo.end();
while ( it != end && ! bar( *it ) ) {
    ++ it;
}
if ( it != foo.end() ) {
    baz();
}

should do the trick, and it avoids the unstructured break.

2
  • 1
    The break is fine IMHO, and in any case that change is completely orthogonal to the actual meat (it != foo.end()).
    – user395760
    Jul 11, 2014 at 9:09
  • @BenVoigt Good point. That's what comes of typing too quickly. Should be a while; I'll fix it. Jul 14, 2014 at 7:52
2

It's not only possible in C++, it's possible in C. I'll stick with C++ to make the code comprehensible though:

for (i=foo.first(); i != NULL || (baz(),0); i = i.next())
{
    if bar(i):
        break;
}

I doubt I'd let that through a code review, but it works and it's efficient. To my mind it's also clearer than some of the other suggestions.

0
1

There is no such language construct in C++, but, thanks to the "magic" of the preprocessor, you can make one for yourself. For example, something like this (C++11):

#include <vector>
#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

#define FOR_EACH(e, c, b) auto e = c.begin(); for (; e != c.end(); ++e) {b} if (e == c.end()) {}

int main()
{
    vector<int> v;
    v.push_back(1);
    v.push_back(2);

    FOR_EACH(x, v, {
        if (*x == 2) {
            break;
        }        
        cout << "x = " << *x << " ";
    })
    else {
        cout << "else";
    }

    return 0;
}

This should output x = 1 else.

If you change if (*x == 2) { to if (*x == 3) {, the output should be x = 1 x = 2.

If you don't like the fact that a variable is added in the current scope, you can change it slightly:

#define FOR_EACH(e, c, b, otherwise) {auto e = c.begin(); for (; e != c.end(); ++e) {b} if (e == c.end()) {} otherwise }

then use would be:

FOR_EACH(x, v, {
    if (*x == 2) {
        break;
    }        
    cout << "x = " << *x << " ";
},
else {
    cout << "else";
})

It's not perfect, of course, but, if used with care, will save you some amount of typing and, if used a lot, would become a part of the project's "vocabulary".

5
  • 3
    Sacrificing readability to save 5 seconds of typing is usually a very bad idea. Dec 11, 2015 at 17:16
  • Well, readability is subjective, while typing isn't. It's a trade-off, like everything else. I'm not advocating its use, just showing how you can achieve a "for each...else" in C++ without goto (which has its own problems). Dec 11, 2015 at 17:56
  • 3
    A goto pattern here is much, much better than declaring a macro.
    – 0kcats
    Dec 15, 2015 at 14:43
  • I'm not sure how I feel about the macro leaving behind a new variable in my scope. In your example an iterator x will be left behind after the else statement. There isn't a nice way to get around this one... Feb 1, 2017 at 8:49
  • I added an example of a way to avoid bringing a new variable into current scope. I'm not saying it's nice, but, it works. :) Feb 1, 2017 at 21:14
0

There probably isn't a single solution that fits best all problems. In my case a flag variable and a range-based for loop with an auto specifier worked best. Here's an equivalent of the code in question:

bool none = true;
for (auto i : foo) {
  if (bar(i)) {
    none = false;
    break;
  }
}
if (none) baz();

It is less typing than using iterators. Especially, if you use the for loop to initialize a variable, you may use that instead of the boolean flag.

Thanks to auto typing it is better than std::none_of, if you want to inline the condition rather than call bar() (and if you are not using C++14).

I had a situation where both conditions occurred, the code looked something like this:

for (auto l1 : leaves) {
  for (auto x : vertices) {
    int l2 = -1, y;
    for (auto e : support_edges[x]) {
      if (e.first != l1 && e.second != l1 && e.second != x) {
        std::tie(l2, y) = e;
        break;
      }
    }
    if (l2 == -1) continue;

    // Do stuff using vertices l1, l2, x and y
  }
}

No need for iterators here, because v indicates whether break occurred.

Using std::none_of would require specifying the type of support_edges[x] elements explicitly in arguments of a lambda expression.

2
0

Direct answer: no, you probably can't, or it is compiler-based, at best. BUT here's a hack of a macro that kind of works!

A few notes:

I usually program with Qt, so I'm used to having a foreach loop, and never have to deal with iterators directly.

I tested this with Qt's compiler (v 5.4.2) but it should work. This is gross for several reasons, but generally does what you'd want. I don't condone coding like this, but there's no reason it shouldn't work as long as you're careful with the syntax.

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>

#define for_else(x, y) __broke__ = false; for(x){y} if (__broke__) {}
#define __break__ __broke__ = true; break

bool __broke__;  // A global... wah wah.

class Bacon {
  public:
    Bacon(bool eggs);

    inline bool Eggs() {return eggs_;}

  private:
    bool eggs_;
};

Bacon::Bacon(bool eggs) {
  eggs_ = eggs;
}

bool bar(Bacon *bacon) {
  return bacon->Eggs();
}

void baz() {
  std::cout << "called baz\n";
}

int main()
{
  std::vector<Bacon *>bacons;

  bacons.push_back(new Bacon(false));
  bacons.push_back(new Bacon(false));
  bacons.push_back(new Bacon(false));

  for_else (uint i = 0; i < bacons.size(); i++,
      std::cout << bacons.at(i)->Eggs();
      if (bar(bacons.at(i))) {
        __break__;
      }
  ) else {
    baz();
  }

  bacons.push_back(new Bacon(true));
  bacons.push_back(new Bacon(false));

  for_else (uint i = 0; i < bacons.size(); i++,
      std::cout << bacons.at(i)->Eggs();
      if (bar(bacons.at(i))) {
        __break__;
      }
  ) else {
    baz();
  }

  return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}
0

You can use for-else almost like in Python by defining two macros:

#define BREAK {CONTINUETOELSE = false; break;}
#define FORWITHELSE(x, y) {bool CONTINUETOELSE = true; x if(!CONTINUETOELSE){} y}

Now you put the for and the else inside the FORWITHELSE macro separated by a comma and use BREAK instead of break. Here is an example:

FORWITHELSE(
    for(int i = 0; i < foo; i++){
        if(bar(i)){
            BREAK;
        }
    },
    else{
        baz();
    }
)

There are two things you need to remember: to put a comma before the else and to use BREAK instead of break.

0

I came here because I had the same question, in C though. The best thing I came out with is

bool notTerminated = true;
for (int i = 0; i < 50 || (notTerminated = false); i++)
    if (bar(i))
        break;
if (! notTerminated)
    baz();

Explanation: the (notTerminated = false) is an assignment that will always return the false value, it will never affect the condition and will be evaluated iif the condition if true.

-1

I would accomplish this with a simple helper variable:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdbool.h>

int main()

{
    bool b;
    printf("Numbers which are multiples of 7:\n");

    for (int i=8; b=(i<12); i++)
    {
        if (i%7==0)
        {
            printf("%d", i);
            break;
        }
    }
    if (!b)
    {
        printf("no numbers found\n");
    }
    return 0;
}

This way, you need to implement the condition (in the above examplei<12) only at one place.

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