18

My problem is quite complex, but can be boiled down to a simple example.

I am writing a custom query language where users can input strings which I parse to LinQ Expressions.

What I would like to able to do is to split strings by the * character, unless it is correctly escaped.

Input         Output                          Query Description
"*\\*"    --> { "*", "\\", "*" }       -- contains a '\'
"*\\\**"  --> { "*", "\\\*", "*" }     -- contains '\*'
"*\**"    --> { "*", "\*", "*" }       -- contains '*' (works now)

I don't mind Regex.Split returning empty strings, but I end up with this:

Regex.Split(@"*\\*", @"(?<!\\)(\*)")  --> {"", "*", "\\*"}

As you can see, I have tried with negative lookbehind, which works for all my cases except this one. I have also tried Regex.Escape, but with no luck.

Obviously, my problem is that I am looking for \*, which \\* matches. But in this case, \\ is another escaped sequence.

Any solution doesn't necessary have to involve a Regex.

9
  • 3
    +1 for distilling the essence of the problem into a nice question. – MarioDS Jul 11 '14 at 9:24
  • In the case of this example you could match with something like (\*)(\\\\)(\*) to get three groups in your match. Is this an acceptable alternative to using split in your real world scenario? – Chris Jul 11 '14 at 9:30
  • Can you show us some different cases and how to parse them? So we won't screw your original (and working) solution? – Vyktor Jul 11 '14 at 9:36
  • I have updated the question with another example. – Troels Larsen Jul 11 '14 at 9:45
  • If you want to split strings by the (unescaped) * character, shouldn't your example #2 be this? "*\\\**" --> { "*", "\\\*", "*" } – groverboy Jul 11 '14 at 9:54
8

I think it's much easier to match than to split, especially since you are not removing anything from the initial string. So what to match? Everything except an unescaped *.

How to do that? With the below regex:

@"(?:[^*\\]+|\\.)+|\*"

(?:[^*\\]+|\\.)+ matches everything that is not a *, or any escaped character. No need for any lookaround.

\* will match the separator.

In code:

using System;
using System.Text.RegularExpressions;
using System.Linq;
public class Test
{
    public static void Main()
    {   
        string[] tests = new string[]{
            @"*\\*",
            @"*\\\**",
            @"*\**",
        };

        Regex re = new Regex(@"(?:[^*\\]+|\\.)+|\*");

        foreach (string s in tests) {
            var parts = re.Matches(s)
             .OfType<Match>()
             .Select(m => m.Value)
             .ToList();

            Console.WriteLine(string.Join(", ", parts.ToArray()));
        }
    }
}

Output:

*, \\, *
*, \\\*, *
*, \*, *

ideone demo

3
  • 1
    Both answers work, however, out of consideration for the poor sod who will maintain this code after I'm gone: The shorter regex wins :D – Troels Larsen Jul 11 '14 at 11:34
  • Nice solution! @TroelsLarsen - this can be shortened slightly to @"(?:[^*\\]|\\.)+|\*". The outer + makes the inner + redundant. – groverboy Jul 12 '14 at 0:24
  • Sort of. You get an ever so slight drop in speed with that @groverboy – Jerry Jul 12 '14 at 3:49
4

I've came up with this regexp (?<=(?:^|[^\\])(?:\\\\)*)(\*).

Explanation:

You just white-list situations that can happen before * and these are:

  • start of the string ^
  • not \ - [^\\]
  • (not \ or beginning of the string) and then even number of \ - (^|[^\\])(\\\\)*

Test code and examples:

string[] tests = new string[]{
    @"*\\*",
    @"*\\\**",
    @"*\**",
    @"test\**test2",
};

Regex re = new Regex(@"(?<=(?:^|[^\\])(?:\\\\)*)(\*)");

foreach (string s in tests) {
    string[] m = re.Split( s );
    Console.WriteLine(String.Format("{0,-20} {1}", s, String.Join(", ",
       m.Where(x => !String.IsNullOrEmpty(x)))));
}

Result:

*\\*                 *, \\, *
*\\\**               *, \\\*, *
*\**                 *, \*, *
test\**test2         test\*, *, test2
1
  • Testing this now in my slightly more elaborate environment.. 36/36 test cases passed. Thank you very much for this! I am sure I will find more exceptions, but this answer has helped me to be able to fix them myself. – Troels Larsen Jul 11 '14 at 10:24
1

I figured a pure parsing, non-regex solution would be a good add to this question.

I could read this significantly faster than I could understand any of those regexes. This also makes fixing unexpected corner-cases easy. The logic is directly laid out.

public static String[] splitOnDelimiterWithEscape(String toSplit, char delimiter, char escape) {
    List<String> strings = new ArrayList<>();

    char[] chars = toSplit.toCharArray();
    String sub = "";

    for(int i = 0 ; i < chars.length ; i++) {
        if(chars[i] == escape) {
            sub += (i+1 < chars.length) ? chars[++i] : ""; //assign whatever char is after the escape to the string. This essentially makes single escape character non-existent. It just forces the next character to be literal. If the escape is at end, then we just ignore it

            //this is the simplest implementation of the escape. If escaping certain characters should have
            //special behaviour it should be implemented here.

            //You could even pass a Map mapping escape characters, to literal characters to make this even 
            //more general.

        } else if(chars[i] == delimiter) {
            strings.add(sub); //Found delimiter. So we split.
            sub = "";
        } else {
            sub += chars[i]; //nothing special. Just append to current string.
        }
    }

    strings.add(sub); //end of string is a boundary. Must include.

    return strings.toArray(new String[strings.size()]);
}

UPDATE: I'm a little bit confused about the question now actually. Splitting, as I've always known it, doesn't include the delimiting(but it looks like your examples do). If you want the delimiters to exist in the array, in their own slot then the modification from this is rather simple. (I'll leave it as an exercise for the reader as evidence for the code's maintainability)

7
  • It surprised me as well. Regex.Split does, whereas String.Split doesn't. Bit bit weird. In my case, I don't need the * – Troels Larsen Jul 11 '14 at 17:24
  • @TroelsLarsen does this solution make sense to you? – Cruncher Jul 11 '14 at 17:26
  • Thanks for your suggestion. Yes, I understand the idea However, it does not return the correct results, but `, *, *` instead of \`, \\*, *`. It appears to strip off the escape characters, which I need for actually performing the query later. That might be a problem in my quick implementation in .NET. – Troels Larsen Jul 11 '14 at 20:24
  • @TroelsLarsen The general idea of an escape sequence, is that if you want the actual escape character, then you need to escape itself. Which still works here. In any case this is easily editable – Cruncher Jul 11 '14 at 20:52
  • 1
    @TroelsLarsen regex split does because you you are wrapping the * between parens. You won't get it otherwise. I thought you needed the asterisk from your desired output. If you actually don't need it, well my regex becomes even shorter! – Jerry Jul 12 '14 at 3:52

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