11

In R user-defined operators are allowed, but it seems that only % % like operators are accepted. Is it possible to walk around this restriction to define operators like, for example, >>, or something that is not like % %?

The operator must be a real operator so that we can use it like 1 >> 2 and do not have to use it like ">>"(1,2).

2
  • 1
    Even if you did use >> as an operator, you can only access it with using quotes or backticks. And even then, rarely in a convenient manner. Example: `>>` <- `+`; ">>"(4, 2) Jul 11 '14 at 12:07
  • Yes: see sos::??? or cgwtools::splatnd for examples. But do take heed of all the warnings provided in the answers and comments. Jul 11 '14 at 13:06
18

No. R only allows you to

  1. redefine existing operators (such as `+` or, indeed, `<-`), and
  2. define new infix operators by surrounding them with %…%.

These are the rules we have to play by. However, inside these rules all is fair game. For instance, we can redefine `+` for character strings to perform concatenation, without destroying its normal meaning (addition):

`+`
# function (e1, e2)  .Primitive("+")

This is the old definition, which we want to preserve for numbers:

`+.default` = .Primitive('+')
`+.character` = paste0`1
`+` = function (e1, e2) UseMethod('+')
1 + 2
# [1] 3
'hello' + 'world'
# [1] "helloworld"

This exploits the S3 class system in R to make `+` fully generic on the type of its first argument.

The list of operators that can thus be redefined is quite eclectic. At first count, it contains the following operators:

+, -, *, /, ^, &, |, :, ::, :::, $, =, <-, <<-, ==, <, <=, >, >=, !=, ~, &&, ||, !, ?, @, :=, (, {, [, [[

(From the {modules} source code.)

In this list, one particular operator is noteworthy: `:=` is an overridable operator (and {data.table} for example uses it) but unlike most the other operators in this list it has no default implementation.

Similarly, you can define assignment versions of pretty much every operator, not just those with a predefined assignment (such as `[<-`). For example, `(<-` and `{<-` are also missing a default implementation. This is why the following code fails:

a = 1
(a) = 2
# Error in (a) = 2 : could not find function "(<-"
{a} = 3
# Error in { : could not find function "{<-"

But the code can be made to work by defining the operators:

`(<-` = `{<-` = function (x, value) value

The same works for every function, including almost all operators1, and even control structures (see the comments below this answer).

By contrast, `**` isn’t a real operator: it’s a syntactic alias for `^`. Users can define their own `**` function but it can’t be called via the code a ** b so it’s not an overridable operator (except via overriding `^`).

In the same vein, you can override -> (only) by redefining <-. This seems like it would rarely make sense — but at least one good example of this exists, to define less verbose lambdas:

> sapply(1 : 4, x -> 2 * x)
[1] 2 4 6 8

Implementation as a gist


1 The only exception are the assignment operators: You cannot change the meaning of a <- b <- c by redefining `<-<-` (and the same for `=<-`, `<<-` and `:=`), due to the language’s operator precedence and associativity rules. However, the following code invokes both `(<-` and `<-<-`, and fails if either of these is not defined:

(a <- b) <- c

Messed up.

8
  • Note that some operators (not all, for a reason I don't understand), work like S3 generics as long as the methods are defined for classes that are not atomic types, for instance "+.data.frame" <- rbind; head(iris) + tail(iris) will work without defining '+' <- function (e1, e2) UseMethod('+'), but this won't work for ~ or :. Apr 11 '19 at 9:47
  • 1
    Thanks, totally unrelated but there is a 3rd category made of := alone too, as it's not properly an "existing" operator. It might deserve a mention. Apr 11 '19 at 10:25
  • 2
    Actually all the *<- variants are free to use (+<- etc). Control flow constructs could also be considered as a type of operator, and they can be redefined if for some reason the syntax made sense for an alternate operation, though I've yet to find a usecase for that despite trying much more than I probably should :). Today for the first time I found how to make while<- work by using -> to hijack the operator precedence : 'while<-' <- function(x,y, value) {print(x); print(y);print(value);x*y*value}; X <- 1; Y <- 2; Z <- 3; Z -> while(X){Y}; X Apr 11 '19 at 11:59
  • 1
    @Moody_Mudskipper Ha, I never considered that but you’re right of course, just like you can define an assignment version for every normal function call. I don’t know why I specifically found (<- and {<-, and why I failed to realise that this was simply a general rule. Apr 11 '19 at 12:07
  • 1
    @Moody_Mudskipper Aaand I’ve updated the answer once more. Thanks for keeping me entertained. ;-) Apr 11 '19 at 12:22
5

You can do things like this, but you may want to assign these objects to a new environment to be safe.

> "^" <- function(x, y) `-`(x, y)  ## subtract y from x
> 5 ^ 3
# [1] 2

> "?" <- function(x, y) sum(x, y)  ## add x and y
> 5 ? 5
# [1] 10
3
  • 5
    These only work because you are reassigning an exiting operator (ie ^ is for using exponentiation and ? is normally for help). If you try to use a different set of symbols like << the parser won't understand and will throw an error. It's probably not a good idea to reassign incase other functions rely on their standard definitions.
    – MrFlick
    Jul 11 '14 at 13:00
  • 1
    @MrFlick While this is an important caveat, see my answer for a way to carefully override operators, which works around this restriction. Jul 11 '14 at 13:04
  • 1
    You could also assign it to a different environment, right? Its own environment. Jul 11 '14 at 13:05

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