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The project builds on Win32 platform, but not on x64.

Full error message: dllentry.obj : error LNK2001: unresolved external symbol "class CFactoryTemplate * g_Templates" (?g_Templates@@3PAVCFactoryTemplate@@A)

The dllentry.cpp compiles on both platforms. It contains the external declarations:

extern CFactoryTemplate g_Templates[];
extern int g_cTemplates;

g_Templates[] is then used in two functions:

__control_entrypoint(DllExport) STDAPI DllGetClassObject(__in REFCLSID rClsID,
    __in REFIID riid, __deref_out void **pv)
{
    ...
    for (int i = 0; i < g_cTemplates; i++)
    {
        const CFactoryTemplate * pT = &g_Templates[i];
    }
}

and

DllInitClasses(BOOL bLoading)
{
    ...
    for (int i = 0; i < g_cTemplates; i++)
    {
        const CFactoryTemplate * pT = &g_Templates[i];
    }
}

I checked all the libraries in the project settings and all seems to be OK, the 64 bit versions are used. What should I do to make the project build for x64 platform?

  • 2
    Where is the definition (not declaration) of g_Templates? Is it possible that file was omitted from the x64 configuration? – dlf Jul 11 '14 at 14:38
  • To locate the problem try to remove extern from the line extern CFactoryTemplate g_Templates[]; – KonstantinL Jul 11 '14 at 14:39
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You stated in a comment to an earlier answer

The other, valid definition, is in myClass.cpp (main class of my project) 'CFactoryTemplate* g_Templates=0;' followed by 'int g_cTemplates=0;' at the uppermost level in the file, just after the includes.

Your definition of of g_Templates is inconsistent with its declaration.

The declaration is

extern CFactoryTemplate g_Templates[];

This declares g_Templates as an array of CFactoryTemplate (of unknown size). But your definition of

CFactoryTemplates* g_Templates = 0;

defines it as a pointer to a CFactoryTemplate, which is not the same thing.

Therefore, you failed to provide a definition of g_Templates that matches the declaration, and the error message is correct.

You need to get the declaration and definition to agree. One way is to write

CFactoryTemplates g_Templates[1];

to create a definition that is consistent with the declaration. (Note that zero-length arrays are disallowed in C++, so instead we create an array of length 1 and ignore the element in it.)

Another is to change the declaration to

extern CFactoryTemplates* g_Templates;
  • Arrays decay to pointers in extern declarations. I tested with VC2012 and it didn't have a problem matching extern int g[] with int* g in another module. – dlf Jul 11 '14 at 15:25
  • But perhaps VC is wrong since further testing shows that while the linker accepts this, the two gs end up being different things (and the debug inspector is very confused). – dlf Jul 11 '14 at 15:28
  • 2
    @dff Arrays do not decay to pointers in extern declarations. They decay to pointers during lvalue-to-rvalue conversion and when declared as function parameters, but a declaration is neither. – Raymond Chen Jul 11 '14 at 15:45
  • Ok; but in that case what's the explanation for the fact that the error message in dllentry.cpp (where g_Templates is declared as an array) is "unresolved external symbol "class CFactoryTemplate * g_Templates""? – dlf Jul 11 '14 at 15:58
  • @dff There must be a pointer-style declaration visible to dllentry.cpp somewhere. – Raymond Chen Jul 11 '14 at 15:59
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The statement extern CFactoryTemplate g_Templates[]; does not actually define an array* named g_Templates; it simply states that one exists somewhere in the project. You are essentially telling the compiler "don't worry that you don't see this thing anywhere; when it comes time to link, you'll be able to find it in a different module." Except that apparently isn't true. Two possible reasons I can think of are (1) The file that contains the actual definition of g_Templates is not being included in the x64 build configuration, and (2) the definition, wherever it is, is surrounded with something like #ifdef x86.

To solve this, you'll need to locate the actual definition of g_Templates (maybe search for "CFactoryTemplate g_Templates[") and then determine why it is being omitted in the x64 build.


* Technically it is treated as a pointer here

  • g_templates is defined in sysclock.cpp, another DirectShow base class, but only under #ifdef FILTER_DLL, condition which is not satisfied in Win32 neither. The other, valid definition, is in myClass.cpp (main class of my project) 'CFactoryTemplate* g_Templates=0;' followed by 'int g_cTemplates=0;' at the uppermost level in the file, just after the includes. myClass.cpp also compiles by itself. Only the build doesn't work. – Felix Pîrvan Jul 11 '14 at 15:05
  • From the original code I gather that you're making a dll and the link error is occurring there. Is myClass.cpp included in that dll, or is it in a separate exe project? – dlf Jul 11 '14 at 15:11

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