5

I just noticed a behaviour with GCC that seems strange to me (not checked with other compilers).

If I compile this code :

#include <stdio.h>

void foo(int i)
{
  printf("Hello %d\n",i);
}

int main(){
  foo(1, 2);
  return 0;
}

I will get a compiler error :

test.c:9:5: error: too many arguments to function ‘foo’

But if I compile this code :

#include <stdio.h>

void foo()
{
  printf("Hello\n");
}

int main(){
  foo(1, 2);
  return 0;
}

I get no errors or warnings.

Could someone explain me why ?

I tested this with gcc 4.6.3 and arm-none-eabi-gcc 4.8.3

EDIT : I compile with all warnings : gcc -Wall test.c

3
  • 1
    add -pedantic to get more warnings
    – mch
    Jul 11 '14 at 14:56
  • 1
    @mch Thanks for the tip, in that case it does not warn either
    – Quentin
    Jul 11 '14 at 15:03
  • You need -Wstrict-prototypes for gcc to warn about it.
    – Étienne
    Jul 11 '14 at 20:02
8

In C, writing void foo() means that foo takes an unspecified number of arguments.

To indicate that the function foo() should take no arguments, you should write void foo(void)

For this reason you should also use the signature int main(void).

3
  • 1
    nice ! I didn't know that specifying void for arguments was different than leaving it empty
    – Quentin
    Jul 11 '14 at 14:55
  • 2
    @Quentin It is only so in C. In C++, they are synonymous. Jul 11 '14 at 14:58
  • 1
    @PascalCuoq (void) is however deprecated in C++, as it is only a backwards-compatible remnant of said C rule. Also, main(void), really ?
    – Quentin
    Jul 11 '14 at 15:04
2

Turn on your warnings!

void foo()

is an old ANSI C way of declaring a function without a proper prototype. If you do this, the function acts sort of like void foo(...), and allows any number of arguments to be passed.

(In C++, void foo() declares a null-arity function as you'd expect).

2
  • 1
    I have no warning with ˇgcc -Wall test.c`
    – Quentin
    Jul 11 '14 at 14:51
  • 1
    I suppose warnings are compiler-dependent. I do get a warning with Clang.
    – nneonneo
    Jul 11 '14 at 14:52
2

I would argue that gcc should complain here. Étienne's answer would be right if f was an extern prototype, but the actual paragraph that discuss this point (6.7.6.3§14 in C11, 6.7.5.3§14 in C99) reads that way (emphasis mine):

An identifier list declares only the identifiers of the parameters of the function. An empty list in a function declarator that is part of a definition of that function specifies that the function has no parameters. The empty list in a function declarator that is not part of a definition of that function specifies that no information about the number or types of the parameters is supplied.

clang (v3.4) indeed emits a warning (too many arguments in call to 'foo') with your file, but would happily (and silently) compile the following two files:

foo.c:

extern void foo();
int main(){
  foo(1, 2);
  return 0;
}

bar.c:

#include <stdio.h>
void foo (int x, int y, int z) { printf("Hello %d\n", z); }

results in:

$ clang -o foo bar.c foo.c
$ ./foo
Hello 1405669720
3
  • +1. Do you know why gcc behaves this way? I searched gcc's documentation but didn't find any reference to this.
    – Étienne
    Jul 11 '14 at 17:50
  • I don't disagree that it should warn, but I don't believe it's required to. A function definition with empty parentheses does not provide a prototype. It specifies no parameters (local objects visible inside the function definition), but (in a weird sense) it doesn't specify that the function expects no arguments. The syntax is a relic of pre-ANSI C; back then, compilers generally wouldn't warn about parameter mismatches. The lesson: Always use prototypes. Jul 11 '14 at 18:51
  • with gcc, you can define function attribute __attribute__ format(type, string, check) that forces the compiler to check printf() or scanf() function parameters against a format string. This is probably what you'll find in your standard library headers.
    – mfro
    Jul 13 '14 at 15:56

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