8

I have a 2d boolean array from which I'm trying to extract the indices of the true values. Numpy's nonzero function decomposes my 2d array into a list of x's and y's of positions, which is problematic.

Is it possible to find the column indices of the true elements while preserving the row order?

Each of the true values in the columns are associated with each other in the same row so splitting them into (row index, column index) pairs isn't helpful. Is this possible?

I was thinking that maybe np.apply_along_axis maybe useful.

  • What output would you like to see? A list of arrays, one per row? – Jaime Jul 11 '14 at 19:48
12

I did not quite understand what you wanted (maybe an example would help), but two guesses:

If you want to see if there are any Trues on a row, then:

np.any(a, axis=1)

will give you an array with boolean value for each row.

Or if you want to get the indices for the Trues row-by-row, then

testarray = np.array([
    [True, False, True],
    [True, True, False],
    [False, False, False],
    [False, True, False]])

collists = [ np.nonzero(t)[0] for t in testarray ]

This gives:

>>> collists
[array([0, 2]), array([0, 1]), array([], dtype=int64), array([1])]

If you want to know the indices of columns with a True on row 3, then:

>>> collists[3]
array([1])  

There is no pure array-based way of accomplishing this because the number of items on each row varies. That is why we need the lists. On the other hand, the performance is decent, I tried it with a 10000 x 10000 random boolean array, and it took 774 ms to complete the task.

  • I was aware of the problem of differing column numbers. I'm surprised the list performance is that good. I'll have to check if this way is fast enough. – tlnagy Jul 12 '14 at 9:39
0

You can sorta do this using pandas. The below example gives you the indices of nonzero elements for each row by using vectorized operations - one for each number of columns in the input data.

import numpy as np
import pandas as pd

np.random.seed(0)

size = int(1e4), 5
d1 = pd.DataFrame(np.random.randint(5, size=size))

print(d1)

nz = pd.Series(np.count_nonzero(d1, axis=1))

max_nz = nz.max()

dfs = []
for _nz, nzdf in d1.groupby(nz, sort=False):

    nz = np.apply_along_axis(lambda r: np.nonzero(r)[0], 1, nzdf)

    mock_result = pd.DataFrame(np.ones(shape=(len(nzdf), max_nz)) - 2, index=nzdf.index)

    for i in range(nz.shape[1]):
        mock_result.iloc[:, i] = nz[:, i]

    dfs.append(mock_result)

result = pd.concat(dfs).sort_index()
print(result)

It will print

      0  1  2  3  4
0     4  0  3  3  3
1     1  3  2  4  0
2     0  4  2  1  0
3     1  1  0  1  4
4     3  0  3  0  2
...  .. .. .. .. ..
9995  0  2  3  1  3
9996  3  3  2  3  1
9997  4  0  3  4  3
9998  4  2  4  0  0
9999  0  3  4  1  2

[10000 rows x 5 columns]
        0    1    2    3    4
0     0.0  2.0  3.0  4.0 -1.0
1     0.0  1.0  2.0  3.0 -1.0
2     1.0  2.0  3.0 -1.0 -1.0
3     0.0  1.0  3.0  4.0 -1.0
4     0.0  2.0  4.0 -1.0 -1.0
...   ...  ...  ...  ...  ...
9995  1.0  2.0  3.0  4.0 -1.0
9996  0.0  1.0  2.0  3.0  4.0
9997  0.0  2.0  3.0  4.0 -1.0
9998  0.0  1.0  2.0 -1.0 -1.0
9999  1.0  2.0  3.0  4.0 -1.0

[10000 rows x 5 columns]

Using this technique I was able to cut down the running time of a row-based version of scipy.stats.rankdata considerably.

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