17

Is it possible to assign a lower priority to a query in MySQL similar to the nice command on the command-line (in Linux)? If not, are there databases that can do something like that?

2
  • Which problem do you want to solve by that?
    – VMai
    Jul 11 '14 at 18:23
  • MySQL has got the opposite: HIGH_PRIORITY gives the SELECT higher priority than a statement that updates a table. You should use this only for queries that are very fast and must be done at once. A SELECT HIGH_PRIORITY query that is issued while the table is locked for reading runs even if there is an update statement waiting for the table to be free. This affects only storage engines that use only table-level locking (such as MyISAM, MEMORY, and MERGE). source: manual page of SELECT
    – VMai
    Jul 11 '14 at 18:28
20

You can use the LOW_PRIORITY or HIGH_PRIORITY in your queries depending on the type of query you execute:

INSERT [LOW_PRIORITY | HIGH_PRIORITY] INTO ...
SELECT [HIGH_PRIORITY] * FROM ...
UPDATE [LOW_PRIORITY] table ...

From the Mysql 5.7 documentation for the INSERT query for instance:

If you use the LOW_PRIORITY keyword, execution of the INSERT is delayed until no other clients are reading from the table. This includes other clients that began reading while existing clients are reading, and while the INSERT LOW_PRIORITY statement is waiting. It is possible, therefore, for a client that issues an INSERT LOW_PRIORITY statement to wait for a very long time.

But it is also said:

This affects only storage engines that use only table-level locking (such as MyISAM, MEMORY, and MERGE)

So you won't be able to use this functionnality with innodb for instance, unless you want to use LOCK_TABLES and thus reduce its performance.

3

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.