69

I love the swipe pack thats inherited from embedding your views in a UINavigationController. Unfortunately i cannot seem to find a way to hide the NavigationBar but still have the touch pan swipe back gesture. I can write custom gestures but I prefer not to and to rely on the UINavigationController back swipe gesture instead.

if I uncheck it in the storyboard, the back swipe doesn't work

enter image description here

alternatively if I programmatically hide it, the same scenario.

- (void)viewDidLoad
{
    [super viewDidLoad];
    [self.navigationController setNavigationBarHidden:YES animated:NO]; // and animated:YES
}

Is there no way to hide the top NavigationBar and still have the swipe?

  • 1
    Is adding a UIGestureRecognizer acceptable? It is a breeze to implement. – SwiftArchitect Jul 12 '14 at 6:35
  • 1
    @LancelotdelaMare, i was trying to avoid that since it wont work as smoothly as the UINavigationController back swipe. Im looking into UIScreenEdgePanGestureRecognizer since some people say it helps but havent gotten it to work yet. Looking for the simplest and most elegant solution here. – mihai Jul 12 '14 at 6:48

17 Answers 17

88

A hack that is working is to set the interactivePopGestureRecognizer's delegate of the UINavigationController to nil like this:

[self.navigationController.interactivePopGestureRecognizer setDelegate:nil];

But in some situations it could create strange effects.

  • 12
    "swiping back repeatedly can cause the gesture to be recognized when there’s only one view controller on the stack, which in turn puts a UI in a (I think unexpected by UIKit engineers) state where it stops recognizing any gestures" – HorseT Jul 24 '14 at 18:22
  • 4
    An alternative that might protect against that unexpected state would be to set it to some low-level object (I used my app delegate) and implement gestureRecognizerShouldBegin, returning true if the navigationController's viewController count is greater than 0. – Kenny Winker Feb 26 '15 at 4:40
  • 3
    Although this works, I HIGHLY recommend against this. Breaking the delegate was causing a rare and hard to identify main thread block. Turns out its not a main thread block but its what @HorseT described. – Josh Bernfeld Aug 7 '15 at 10:03
  • 2
    My app saves the delegate handle then restores it in viewWillDisappear and so far have not experienced adverse side-effect. – Don Park Aug 19 '15 at 4:42
  • 1
    !!!! Highly discourage to use this solution , when repeatedly using swipe a strange behaviour occurs, the back is disabled and whole app doens't respond any more – KarimIhab Jun 14 '16 at 13:28
56

Problems with Other Methods

Setting the interactivePopGestureRecognizer.delegate = nil has unintended side-effects.

Setting navigationController?.navigationBar.hidden = true does work, but does not allow your change in navigation bar to be hidden.

Lastly, it's generally better practice to create a model object that is the UIGestureRecognizerDelegate for your navigation controller. Setting it to a controller in the UINavigationController stack is what is causing the EXC_BAD_ACCESS errors.

Full Solution

First, add this class to your project:

class InteractivePopRecognizer: NSObject, UIGestureRecognizerDelegate {

    var navigationController: UINavigationController

    init(controller: UINavigationController) {
        self.navigationController = controller
    }

    func gestureRecognizerShouldBegin(_ gestureRecognizer: UIGestureRecognizer) -> Bool {
        return navigationController.viewControllers.count > 1
    }

    // This is necessary because without it, subviews of your top controller can
    // cancel out your gesture recognizer on the edge.
    func gestureRecognizer(_ gestureRecognizer: UIGestureRecognizer, shouldRecognizeSimultaneouslyWith otherGestureRecognizer: UIGestureRecognizer) -> Bool {
        return true
    }
}

Then, set your navigation controller's interactivePopGestureRecognizer.delegate to an instance of your new InteractivePopRecognizer class.

var popRecognizer: InteractivePopRecognizer?

override func viewDidLoad() {
    super.viewDidLoad()
    setInteractiveRecognizer()
}

private func setInteractiveRecognizer() {
    guard let controller = navigationController else { return }
    popRecognizer = InteractivePopRecognizer(controller: controller)
    controller.interactivePopGestureRecognizer?.delegate = popRecognizer
}

Enjoy a hidden navigation bar with no side effects, that works even if your top controller has table, collection, or scroll view subviews.

  • 1
    Great solution! – Matt Butler Feb 9 '17 at 23:52
  • 1
    The best answer, Thanks! – dory daniel May 22 '17 at 12:31
  • 2
    @HunterMaximillionMonk thanks for the great solution. It works like a charm – as diu Jul 14 '17 at 20:26
  • 1
    @HunterMaximillionMonk this seems works correctly but the problem with it when i have multiple controllers then after one time pop it stops working. – Premal Khetani Aug 2 '17 at 6:05
  • 1
    Definitely best answer! – daxh Oct 9 '17 at 16:34
52

In my case, to prevent strange effects

Root view controller

override func viewDidLoad() {
    super.viewDidLoad()

    // Enable swipe back when no navigation bar
    navigationController?.interactivePopGestureRecognizer?.delegate = self 

}


func gestureRecognizerShouldBegin(_ gestureRecognizer: UIGestureRecognizer) -> Bool {
    if(navigationController!.viewControllers.count > 1){
        return true
    }
    return false
}

http://www.gampood.com/pop-viewcontroller-with-out-navigation-bar/

  • 2
    Sometimes I'm getting EXC_BAD_ACCESS when using this – Andrey Gordeev Aug 5 '15 at 11:07
  • For me, it doesn't make the gesture work and frequently crashes with the EXEC_BAD_ACCESS – Benjohn Sep 30 '15 at 10:29
  • 1
    Remember to add UIGestureRecognizerDelegate to the root view controller... In my case the delegate was set to nil in a later view controller than the root view controller, so when returned to the root view controller, gestureRecognizerShouldBegin wasn't called. So I placed the .delegate = self in viewDidAppear(). That solved the strange effects in my case.. Cheers! – Wiingaard Nov 20 '15 at 14:51
  • @AndreyGordeev Could you please give some details about when EXEC_BAD_ACCESS happens? – Jaybo Jan 18 '16 at 16:19
  • Here's more info about EXC_BAD_ACCESS error: stackoverflow.com/questions/28746123/… – Andrey Gordeev Mar 11 '16 at 12:59
16

You can subclass UINavigationController as following:

@interface CustomNavigationController : UINavigationController<UIGestureRecognizerDelegate>

@end

Implementation:

@implementation CustomNavigationController

- (void)setNavigationBarHidden:(BOOL)hidden animated:(BOOL)animated {
    [super setNavigationBarHidden:hidden animated:animated];
    self.interactivePopGestureRecognizer.delegate = self;
}

- (BOOL)gestureRecognizerShouldBegin:(UIGestureRecognizer *)gestureRecognizer {
    if (self.viewControllers.count > 1) {
        return YES;
    }
    return NO;
}

@end
  • 1
    Using this approach is breaking pop gesture in UIPageViewController overscroll. – atulkhatri Mar 3 '16 at 14:30
  • I found that viewController.count > 1 check is necessary. If the user attempts to swipe back with only the root VC, the UI would hang on next VC push. – VaporwareWolf Jan 5 '17 at 4:53
15

(Updated) Swift 4.2

I found that other posted solutions overriding the delegate, or setting it to nil caused some unexpected behavior.

In my case, when I was on the top of the navigation stack and tried to use the gesture to pop one more, it would fail (as expected), but subsequent attempts to push onto the stack would start to cause weird graphical glitches in the navigation bar. This makes sense, because the delegate is being used to handle more than just whether or not to block the gesture from being recognized when the navigation bar is hidden, and all that other behavior was being thrown out.

From my testing, it appears that gestureRecognizer(_:, shouldReceiveTouch:) is the method that the original delegate is implementing to block the gesture from being recognized when the navigation bar is hidden, not gestureRecognizerShouldBegin(_:). Other solutions that implement gestureRecognizerShouldBegin(_:) in their delegate work because the lack of an implementation of gestureRecognizer(_:, shouldReceiveTouch:) will cause the default behavior of receiving all touches.

@Nathan Perry's solution gets close, but without an implementation of respondsToSelector(_:), the UIKit code that sends messages to the delegate will believe there is no implementation for any of the other delegate methods, and forwardingTargetForSelector(_:) will never get called.

So, we take control of `gestureRecognizer(_:, shouldReceiveTouch:) in the one specific scenario we want to modify the behavior, and otherwise forward everything else to the delegate.

import Foundation

class AlwaysPoppableNavigationController: UINavigationController {
    private let alwaysPoppableDelegate = AlwaysPoppableDelegate()

    override func viewDidLoad() {
        super.viewDidLoad()
        alwaysPoppableDelegate.originalDelegate = interactivePopGestureRecognizer?.delegate
        alwaysPoppableDelegate.navigationController = self
        interactivePopGestureRecognizer?.delegate = alwaysPoppableDelegate
    }
}

final class AlwaysPoppableDelegate: NSObject, UIGestureRecognizerDelegate {
    weak var navigationController: UINavigationController?
    weak var originalDelegate: UIGestureRecognizerDelegate?

    override func responds(to aSelector: Selector!) -> Bool {
        if aSelector == #selector(gestureRecognizer(_:shouldReceive:)) {
            return true
        } else if let responds = originalDelegate?.responds(to: aSelector) {
            return responds
        } else {
            return false
        }
    }

    override func forwardingTarget(for aSelector: Selector!) -> Any? {
        return originalDelegate
    }

    func gestureRecognizer(_ gestureRecognizer: UIGestureRecognizer, shouldReceive touch: UITouch) -> Bool {
        if let nav = navigationController, nav.isNavigationBarHidden, nav.viewControllers.count > 1 {
            return true
        } else if let result = originalDelegate?.gestureRecognizer?(gestureRecognizer, shouldReceive: touch) {
            return result
        } else {
            return false
        }
    }
}
  • Have you updated this for Swift 3 yet? – Piotr Tomasik Oct 6 '16 at 7:22
  • Not yet. I'll update the answer once I do, thanks! – Chris Vasselli Oct 8 '16 at 17:59
  • Looks like your solution is the best for this moment. Thanks! – Timur Bernikovich Jan 27 '17 at 13:37
  • "but subsequent attempts to push onto the stack would start to cause weird graphical glitches in the navigation bar" - I'm confused here. I thought we had no navigation bar? That's the question? In my situation, I have a navigation controller embedded as a child view controller with no navbar; the containing VC has the navigation controls. So I've let the containing VC be the recognizer's delegate and just did the gestureRecognizerShouldBegin: thing, and it "seems to work". Wondering would I should look out for. – skagedal Feb 2 '17 at 17:04
  • 1
    This had a memory leak since the navigationController was a strong reference in the AlwaysPoppableDelegate. I've edited the code to make this a weak reference. – Graham Perks Jun 1 '17 at 20:21
8

Building off of Hunter Maximillion Monk's answer, I made a subclass for UINavigationController and then set the custom class for my UINavigationController in my storyboard. Final code for the two classes looks like this:

InteractivePopRecognizer:

class InteractivePopRecognizer: NSObject {

    // MARK: - Properties

    fileprivate weak var navigationController: UINavigationController?

    // MARK: - Init

    init(controller: UINavigationController) {
        self.navigationController = controller

        super.init()

        self.navigationController?.interactivePopGestureRecognizer?.delegate = self
    }
}

extension InteractivePopRecognizer: UIGestureRecognizerDelegate {
    func gestureRecognizerShouldBegin(_ gestureRecognizer: UIGestureRecognizer) -> Bool {
        return (navigationController?.viewControllers.count ?? 0) > 1
    }

    // This is necessary because without it, subviews of your top controller can cancel out your gesture recognizer on the edge.
    func gestureRecognizer(_ gestureRecognizer: UIGestureRecognizer, shouldRecognizeSimultaneouslyWith otherGestureRecognizer: UIGestureRecognizer) -> Bool {
        return true
    }
}

HiddenNavBarNavigationController:

class HiddenNavBarNavigationController: UINavigationController {

    // MARK: - Properties

    private var popRecognizer: InteractivePopRecognizer?

    // MARK: - Lifecycle

    override func viewDidLoad() {
        super.viewDidLoad()
        setupPopRecognizer()
    }

    // MARK: - Setup

    private func setupPopRecognizer() {
        popRecognizer = InteractivePopRecognizer(controller: self)
    }
}

Storyboard:

Storyboard nav controller custom class

7

Looks like solution provided by @ChrisVasseli is the best. I'd like to provide same solution in Objective-C because question is about Objective-C (see tags)

@interface InteractivePopGestureDelegate : NSObject <UIGestureRecognizerDelegate>

@property (nonatomic, weak) UINavigationController *navigationController;
@property (nonatomic, weak) id<UIGestureRecognizerDelegate> originalDelegate;

@end

@implementation InteractivePopGestureDelegate

- (BOOL)gestureRecognizer:(UIGestureRecognizer *)gestureRecognizer shouldReceiveTouch:(UITouch *)touch
{
    if (self.navigationController.navigationBarHidden && self.navigationController.viewControllers.count > 1) {
        return YES;
    } else {
        return [self.originalDelegate gestureRecognizer:gestureRecognizer shouldReceiveTouch:touch];
    }
}

- (BOOL)respondsToSelector:(SEL)aSelector
{
    if (aSelector == @selector(gestureRecognizer:shouldReceiveTouch:)) {
        return YES;
    } else {
        return [self.originalDelegate respondsToSelector:aSelector];
    }
}

- (id)forwardingTargetForSelector:(SEL)aSelector
{
    return self.originalDelegate;
}

@end

@interface NavigationController ()

@property (nonatomic) InteractivePopGestureDelegate *interactivePopGestureDelegate;

@end

@implementation NavigationController

- (void)viewDidLoad
{
    [super viewDidLoad];

    self.interactivePopGestureDelegate = [InteractivePopGestureDelegate new];
    self.interactivePopGestureDelegate.navigationController = self;
    self.interactivePopGestureDelegate.originalDelegate = self.interactivePopGestureRecognizer.delegate;
    self.interactivePopGestureRecognizer.delegate = self.interactivePopGestureDelegate;
}

@end
  • 1
    Because ObjC is not dead yet! 😉 – MonsieurDart Feb 14 '17 at 14:35
  • 1
    This is the correct solution. Any other solution that does not forward to the original delegate is incorrect. – Josh Bernfeld Oct 8 '17 at 20:03
3

You can do it with a Proxy Delegate. When you are building the navigation controller, grab the existing delegate. And pass it into the proxy. Then pass all delegate methods to the existing delegate except gestureRecognizer:shouldReceiveTouch: using forwardingTargetForSelector:

Setup:

let vc = UIViewController(nibName: nil, bundle: nil)
let navVC = UINavigationController(rootViewController: vc)
let bridgingDelegate = ProxyDelegate()
bridgingDelegate.existingDelegate = navVC.interactivePopGestureRecognizer?.delegate
navVC.interactivePopGestureRecognizer?.delegate = bridgingDelegate

Proxy Delegate:

class ProxyDelegate: NSObject, UIGestureRecognizerDelegate {
    var existingDelegate: UIGestureRecognizerDelegate? = nil

    override func forwardingTargetForSelector(aSelector: Selector) -> AnyObject? {
        return existingDelegate
    }

    func gestureRecognizer(gestureRecognizer: UIGestureRecognizer, shouldReceiveTouch touch: UITouch) -> Bool {
        return true
    }  
}
  • This answer is true Obj-C style! – Sound Blaster Aug 28 '16 at 21:30
  • forwardingTargetForSelector would have saved me so much time on a past project had I known about it. Good stuff! – VaporwareWolf Jan 5 '17 at 4:54
3

My solution is to directly extend the UINavigationController class :

import UIKit

extension UINavigationController: UIGestureRecognizerDelegate {

    override open func viewDidAppear(_ animated: Bool) {
        super.viewDidAppear(animated)

        self.interactivePopGestureRecognizer?.delegate = self
    }

    public func gestureRecognizerShouldBegin(_ gestureRecognizer: UIGestureRecognizer) -> Bool {
        return self.viewControllers.count > 1
    }

}

This way, all navigation controllers will be dismissable by sliding.

3

Simple, no side-effect Answer

While most answers here are good, they seemingly have unintended side-effects (app breaking) or are verbose.

The most simple yet functional solution I could come up with was the following:

In the ViewController that you are hiding the navigationBar,

class MyNoNavBarViewController: UIViewController {

    // needed for reference when leaving this view controller
    var initialInteractivePopGestureRecognizerDelegate: UIGestureRecognizerDelegate?

    override func viewDidLoad() {
        super.viewDidLoad()

        // we will need a reference to the initial delegate so that when we push or pop.. 
        // ..this view controller we can appropriately assign back the original delegate
        initialInteractivePopGestureRecognizerDelegate = self.navigationController?.interactivePopGestureRecognizer?.delegate
    }

    override func viewWillAppear(_ animated: Bool) {
        super.viewWillAppear(true)

        // we must set the delegate to nil whether we are popping or pushing to..
        // ..this view controller, thus we set it in viewWillAppear()
        self.navigationController?.interactivePopGestureRecognizer?.delegate = nil
    }

    override func viewWillDisappear(_ animated: Bool) {
        super.viewWillDisappear(true)

        // and every time we leave this view controller we must set the delegate back..
        // ..to what it was originally
        self.navigationController?.interactivePopGestureRecognizer?.delegate = initialInteractivePopGestureRecognizerDelegate
    }
}

Other answers have suggested merely setting the delegate to nil. Swiping backwards to the initial view controller on the navigation stack results in all gestures to be disabled. Some sort of oversight, perhaps, of the UIKit/UIGesture devs.

As well, some answers here that I have implemented resulted in non-standard apple navigation behaviour (specifically, allowing for the ability to scroll up or down while also swiping backwards). These answers also seem a bit verbose and in some cases incomplete.

1

Xamarin Answer:

Implement the IUIGestureRecognizerDelegate Interface in your ViewController's Class definition:

public partial class myViewController : UIViewController, IUIGestureRecognizerDelegate

In your ViewController add the following method:

[Export("gestureRecognizerShouldBegin:")]
public bool ShouldBegin(UIGestureRecognizer recognizer) {
  if (recognizer is UIScreenEdgePanGestureRecognizer && 
      NavigationController.ViewControllers.Length == 1) {
    return false;
  }
  return true;
}

In your ViewController's ViewDidLoad() add the following line :

NavigationController.InteractivePopGestureRecognizer.Delegate = this;
  • Presumably this is in the UINavigationController's root view controller? I get the EXEC_BAD_ACCESS when I try this. – Benjohn Sep 30 '15 at 10:26
  • You're able to edge pan on the root view controller? That shouldn't be possible because when you're at the root VC you've popped all other VCs, and the length of your Nav's VC array should be 1. – Ahmad Sep 30 '15 at 11:42
  • The crash occurs before the call to gestureRecognizerShouldBegin:. – Benjohn Sep 30 '15 at 12:00
  • 1
    Can you post your VC code in a new Question or on Xamarin forums? – Ahmad Sep 30 '15 at 14:03
  • @Benjohn have you resolved your signal issue? – Ahmad Oct 1 '15 at 12:45
1

I've tried this and it's working perfectly : How to hide Navigation Bar without losing slide-back ability

The idea is to implement "UIGestureRecognizerDelegate" in your .h and add this to your .m file.

- (void)viewWillAppear:(BOOL)animated {
// hide nav bar
[[self navigationController] setNavigationBarHidden:YES animated:YES];

// enable slide-back
if ([self.navigationController respondsToSelector:@selector(interactivePopGestureRecognizer)]) {
    self.navigationController.interactivePopGestureRecognizer.enabled = YES;
    self.navigationController.interactivePopGestureRecognizer.delegate = self;
  }
}

- (BOOL)gestureRecognizerShouldBegin:(UIGestureRecognizer *)gestureRecognizer {
   return YES;  
}
1

Here is my solution: I am changing alpha on the navigation bar, but the navigation bar is not hidden. All my view controllers are a subclass of my BaseViewController, and there I have:

    override func viewDidAppear(_ animated: Bool) {
    super.viewDidAppear(animated)
    navigationController?.navigationBar.alpha = 0.0
}

You could also subclass UINavigationController and put that method there.

0

Some people have had success by calling the setNavigationBarHidden method with animated YES instead.

  • I tried no luck. Updating my answer to cover this suggestion. – mihai Jul 14 '14 at 14:53
0

In my view controller without navigationbar I use

open override func viewWillAppear(_ animated: Bool) {
  super.viewWillAppear(animated)

  CATransaction.begin()
  UIView.animate(withDuration: 0.25, animations: { [weak self] in
    self?.navigationController?.navigationBar.alpha = 0.01
  })
  CATransaction.commit()
}

open override func viewWillDisappear(_ animated: Bool) {
  super.viewWillDisappear(animated)
  CATransaction.begin()
  UIView.animate(withDuration: 0.25, animations: { [weak self] in
    self?.navigationController?.navigationBar.alpha = 1.0
  })
  CATransaction.commit()
}

During the interactive dismissal the back button will shine through though, which is why I hid it.

0

There is a really simple solution that I tried and works perfectly, this is in Xamarin.iOS but can be applied to native too:

    public override void ViewWillAppear(bool animated)
    {
        base.ViewWillAppear(animated);
        this.NavigationController.SetNavigationBarHidden(true, true);
    }

    public override void ViewDidAppear(bool animated)
    {
        base.ViewDidAppear(animated);
        this.NavigationController.SetNavigationBarHidden(false, false);
        this.NavigationController.NavigationBar.Hidden = true;
    }

    public override void ViewWillDisappear(bool animated)
    {
        base.ViewWillDisappear(animated);
        this.NavigationController.SetNavigationBarHidden(true, false);
    }
-6

Here is how to disable de gesture recognizer when user slides out of the ViewController. You can paste it on your viewWillAppear() or on your ViewDidLoad() methods.

if ([self.navigationController respondsToSelector:@selector(interactivePopGestureRecognizer)]) {
    self.navigationController.interactivePopGestureRecognizer.enabled = NO;
}
  • Please read the question before posting answers. The question was about enabling it, not disabling it. WE LOVE THE POP GESTURE. – Yogesh Maheshwari Jul 13 '15 at 14:29

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