85

I am making a piece of code for a website that will have a list of names in an array and pick a random name, I want to add a feature that will let the user add or delete a name from the array. I have all of these features but when deleting a name, the user has to type the name to match the Case in the array. I tried to make the so it would be Case-Insensitive, what am I doing wrong?

<html>
<!--Other code uneeded for this question-->
<p id="canidates"></p>
<body>
<input type="text" id="delname" /><button onclick="delName()">Remove Name from List</button>
<script>

//Array of names

var names = [];

//Other code uneeded for this question

//List of Canidates
document.getElementById('canidates').innerHTML = 
"<strong>List of Canidates:</strong> " + names.join(" | ");

//Other code uneeded for this question

//Remove name from Array

function delName() {
    var dnameVal = document.getElementById('delname').value;
    var pos = names.indexOf(dnameVal);
    var namepos = names[pos]
    var posstr = namepos.toUpperCase();
    var dup = dnameVal.toUpperCase();
    if(dup != posstr) {
        alert("Not a valid name");
        }
    else {
        names.splice(pos, 1);
        document.getElementById('canidates').innerHTML = 
        "<strong>List of Canidates:</strong> " + names.join(" | ");
        }
    }   
</script>
</body>
</html>
3
  • 3
    You can't make .indexOf() case insensitive. You can normalize the case between the Array and the search term. You seem to be doing a search and then converting the case, so that isn't going to help you. You could do .toUpperCase() on the dnameVal before the search, but that would only work if all the names are also upper case. Jul 13, 2014 at 0:01
  • 3
    The question that was linked to as the duplicate is about a case-insensitive search in a string, while this one is about a case-insensitive search in an array. Jul 13, 2014 at 0:14
  • 3
    In this question, the OP is using Array.indexOf, the answer that is pointed to (and why closed) is using String.indexOf
    – Xotic750
    Jul 13, 2014 at 0:15

13 Answers 13

85

ES2015 findIndex:

var array = ['I', 'hAve', 'theSe', 'ITEMs'],
    indexOf = (arr, q) => arr.findIndex(item => q.toLowerCase() === item.toLowerCase());

console.log(  indexOf(array, 'i')      ) // 0
console.log(  indexOf(array, 'these')  ) // 2
console.log(  indexOf(array, 'items')  ) // 3

5
  • 10
    Not supported by Internet Explorer.
    – V Setyawan
    Apr 11, 2017 at 17:12
  • 1
    @Vznz - if you're using Babel or something similar it will transpile it automatically, it is a very common practice these days.
    – vsync
    Feb 17, 2020 at 19:53
  • 4
    @VSetyawan who cares? that browser should long been gone!
    – eddy
    Sep 9, 2020 at 0:55
  • 2
    @VSetyawan Lol, what is though ¯_(ツ)_/¯
    – Jim Jam
    Jun 7, 2021 at 15:58
  • @eddy, shame your personal opinion of what should or shouldn't be has zero bearing on reality. There are companies and organizations still using DOS for any of numerous different reasons; IE is hardly that unusual. 😒
    – Synetech
    Mar 18, 2023 at 21:04
34

In ECMA-262, 5th edition, you could use Array.prototype.some for this.

var array = [ 'I', 'hAve', 'theSe', 'ITEMs' ];
var query = 'these'.toLowerCase();
var index = -1;
array.some(function(element, i) {
    if (query === element.toLowerCase()) {
        index = i;
        return true;
    }
});
// Result: index = 2
2
  • 2
    This is the best answer if you change query to query.toLowerCase() in your if. Jul 13, 2014 at 1:37
  • 3
    @sxnine And likewise, you would actually use String(element).toLowerCase() in case element wasn't guaranteed to be a string... I assumed the query was already in lower case. I edited the post to add it outside the loop for demonstration purposes. It doesn't belong inside the loop because then it would happen for each iteration.
    – quietmint
    Jul 13, 2014 at 2:23
30

Easy way would be to have a temporary array that contains all the names in uppercase. Then you can compare the user input. So your code could become somthing like this:

function delName() {
    var dnameVal = document.getElementById('delname').value;
    var upperCaseNames = names.map(function(value) {
      return value.toUpperCase();
    });
    var pos = upperCaseNames.indexOf(dnameVal.toUpperCase());

    if(pos === -1) {
        alert("Not a valid name");
        }
    else {
        names.splice(pos, 1);
        document.getElementById('canidates').innerHTML = 
        "<strong>List of Canidates:</strong> " + names.join(" | ");
        }
    }

Hope this helps solve your problem.

2
  • 2
    Everyone is seriously overthinking this with their custom indexOf implementation...Although I liked user113215 answer of using Array.prototype.some...
    – Ralph
    Jul 13, 2014 at 10:23
  • Why even create an array which is all in upper case? Why not just convert the array directly to something which is already case-comparable? Like a string?
    – DMCoding
    May 10, 2016 at 12:32
13

The most elegant solution would be to convert the array into a string first, then do a case insensitive comparison. For example:

var needle = "PearS"
var haystack = ["Apple", "banNnas", "pEArs"];
var stricmp = haystack.toString().toLowerCase(); // returns 
                                   // "apple,bananas,pears"
if (stricmp.indexOf(needle.toLowerCase()) > -1) {
    // the search term was found in the array
} else {
    // the search term was not found in the array
}
2
  • 5
    I hope needle never contains a comma.
    – quietmint
    Oct 27, 2016 at 16:06
  • 2
    What about substrings? According to this needle='p' would also be part of haystack
    – Gio
    Jul 7, 2017 at 15:33
5

Probably best to create your own custom indexOf method, something like this.

'use strict';

var customIndexOf = function(arrayLike, searchElement) {
  var object = Object(arrayLike);
  var length = object.length >>> 0;
  var fromIndex = arguments.length > 2 ? arguments[2] >> 0 : 0;
  if (length < 1 || typeof searchElement !== 'string' || fromIndex >= length) {
    return -1;
  }

  if (fromIndex < 0) {
    fromIndex = Math.max(length - Math.abs(fromIndex), 0);
  }

  var search = searchElement.toLowerCase();
  for (var index = fromIndex; index < length; index += 1) {
    if (index in object) {
      var item = object[index];
      if (typeof item === 'string' && search === item.toLowerCase()) {
        return index;
      }
    }
  }

  return -1;
};

var names = [
  'John',
  'Anne',
  'Brian'
];

console.log(customIndexOf(names, 'aNnE'));

Or even

'use strict';

var customIndexOf = function(array, searchElement, fromIndex) {
  return array.map(function(value) {
    return value.toLowerCase();
  }).indexOf(searchElement.toLowerCase(), fromIndex);
};

var names = [
  'John',
  'Anne',
  'Brian'
];

console.log(customIndexOf(names, 'aNnE'));

You may also want to add more checks to be sure that each element in the array is actually a String and that the searchElement is also actually a String too. If pre-ES5 then load appropriate shims

4

You can use Array.prototype.find()

found = myArray.find(key => key.toUpperCase() === searchString.toUpperCase()) != undefined;

Example:

myArray = ['An', 'aRRay', 'oF', 'StringS'];
searchString = 'array';
found = myArray.find(key => key.toUpperCase() === searchString.toUpperCase()) != undefined;
if (found ) {
    // The array contains the search string
}
else {
    // Search string not found
}

Note: Array cannot contain undefined as a value.

1

It is possible using by map method. For example see below code

var _name = ['prasho','abraham','sam','anna']
var _list = [{name:'prasho'},{name:'Gorge'}];

for(var i=0;i<_list.length;i++)
{
   if(_name.map(function (c) {
     return c.toLowerCase();
   }).indexOf(_list[i].name.toLowerCase()) != -1) { 
  //do what ever
   }else{
     //do what ever
   }
}

More info

1

I needed something similar to this where I needed compare two strings using includes and needed to be able to support both case and case insensitive searches so I wrote the following small function

function compare(l1: string, l2: string, ignoreCase = true): boolean {
  return (ignoreCase ? l1.toLowerCase() : l1).includes((ignoreCase ? l2.toLowerCase() : l2));
}

Same principle could apply to indexOf as below

function indexOf(l1: string, l2: string, ignoreCase = true): number {
  return (ignoreCase ? l1.toLowerCase() : l1).indexOf((ignoreCase ? l2.toLowerCase() : l2));
}

I know this is not specifically Array.indexOf but hope this helps someone out if the come across this post on their travels.

To answer the ops question though, you can apply this similarly to an array combined with this answer from @ULIT JAIDEE (the slight change to this was using the tilda character as a separator in case any of the array values contained spaces)

function compare(l1: any[], l2: any[], ignoreCase = true): boolean {
  return (ignoreCase ? l1.join('~').toLowerCase().split('~') : l1).indexOf((ignoreCase ? l2.join('~').toLowerCase().split('~') : l2));
}

Again hope this helps.

1

To improve on @vsync answer and handle mixed content in the array here is my take. (I understand the OP is about case-sensitive thus it implies strings, maybe :)

var array = ['I', 'hAve', 7, {}, 'theSe', 'ITEMs'],
  Contains = (arr, q) =>
    arr.findIndex((item) => q.toString().toLowerCase() === item.toString().toLowerCase());

console.log(Contains(array, 'i'));
console.log(Contains(array, 'x'));
console.log(Contains(array, {} ));
console.log(Contains(array, 7 ));

0

Turn the array into a string separated by a delimiter, turn that string lowercase, and then split the string back into an array by the same delimiter:

function findIt(arr, find, del) {
  if (!del) { del = '_//_'; }
  arr = arr.join(del).toLowerCase().split(del);
  return arr.indexOf(find.toLowerCase());
}

var arr = ['Tom Riddle', 'Ron Weasley', 'Harry Potter', 'Hermione Granger'];
var find = 'HaRrY PoTtEr';
var index = findIt(arr, find);

if (~index) {
  alert('Found ' + arr[index] + '! :D');
} else {
  alert('Did not find it. D:');
}

0

This is the shortest one.

haystack.join(' ').toLowerCase().split(' ').indexOf(needle.toLowerCase())
1
  • 3
    I hope your haystack will never contain strings with spaces.
    – Forage
    Jun 10, 2020 at 14:03
0
// unique only, removes latter occurrences    
array.filter((v, i, a) => a.findIndex(j => v.toLowerCase() === j.toLowerCase()) === i);
-2

You can't make it case-insensitive. I'd use an object instead to hold a set of names:

function Names() {
    this.names = {};

    this.getKey = function(name) {
        return name.toLowerCase();
    }

    this.add = function(name) {
        this.names[this.getKey(name)] = name;
    }

    this.remove = function(name) {
        var key = this.getKey(name);

        if (key in this.names) {
            delete this.names[key];
        } else {
            throw Error('Name does not exist');
        }
    }

    this.toString = function() {
        var names = [];

        for (var key in this.names) {
            names.push(this.names[key]);
        }

        return names.join(' | ');
    }
}

var names = new Names();

function update() {
    document.getElementById('canidates').innerHTML = '<strong>List of Canidates:</strong> ' + names;
}

function deleteName() {
    var name = document.getElementById('delname').value;

    try {
        names.remove(name);
        update();
    } catch {
        alert('Not a valid name');
    }
}

update();

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