16

I have two classes, Parent:

public class Parent {
    public String a = "asd";

    public void method() {

    }
}

And Child:

public class Child extends Parent{
    private String a = "12";

    private void method() {

    }
}

In Child, I try to override the parent method which gives a compile time error of cannot reduce visibility of a method which is fine.

But, why is this error not applicable to property a? I am also reducing visibility of a, but it doesn't give an error.

24

This is because Parent.a and Child.a are different things. Child#method() @Overrides Parent#method(), as they are methods. Inheritance does not apply to fields.

From the Oracle JavaTM Tutorials - Inheritance, it was written that:

What You Can Do in a Subclass

  • The inherited fields can be used directly, just like any other fields.
  • You can declare a field in the subclass with the same name as the one in the superclass, thus hiding it (not recommended).
  • You can declare new fields in the subclass that are not in the superclass.
  • 1
    Inheritance does not apply to fields. this doesn't look so, if i have public String b in Parent then i can access it in Child – Bhuvan Jul 13 '14 at 6:29
  • 1
    @user2410148 Yes, but that's solely due to access, Child.a is not inheriting Parent.a. It's also such that you can use this.a and super.a within Child - Child.a is not inherited, similar to constant fields in an interface. – Unihedron Jul 13 '14 at 6:31
  • if you can point me to a resource which clearly state what you are saying above then that will be a awesome help – Bhuvan Jul 13 '14 at 6:35
11

You can't. You are not reducing the visibility of a - you are creating a new, separate field which is also called a.

  • 2
    Doesn't this sort of violate Liskov substitution principle? Or does the principle apply only to methods? – Wand Maker Jul 13 '14 at 5:49
  • 1
    @WandMaker How does it violate that? If you have a Parent p; then p.a is still the same field even if it refers to a Child. To access the new field you would need to use ((Child)p).a. – immibis Jul 13 '14 at 7:01
  • 1
    I mean Substitution principle says that a a child class can be used via a reference to base class. So, if we had a public member variable in child, it would have effectively overridden the same name variable from base class. The fact that when we declare a private variable with same name in child class but do not get any warning/error, seems to indicate that one may have side effects while using base class reference for child class that one may not have desired intentionally. Why consider only public method as part of contract, and not public variables too? – Wand Maker Jul 13 '14 at 7:16
  • 2
    @WandMaker when using a base class reference, you can only access the base class's field. – immibis Jul 13 '14 at 7:57
  • @WandMaker, probably. – Paul Draper Jul 13 '14 at 15:21
4

You are actually creating a private variable for Child. So, Child has two a's, one private and one public. Code below shows you how to access both. The methods are for the entire class (Parent) and its subclasses. Hence you get the error for the method.

Try this code to see the two a's :

public class Child extends Parent{
    private String a = "12";

    //private void method() {}

    public static void main(String[]args){
        Child c = new Child();
        Parent p = c;
        System.out.println(c.a + ", " + p.a);//12, asd

    }

}

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