3

In my query, I use the IIF function to assign either "Before" or "After" to a field named BeforeOrAfter using AS.

When I run this query, however, the "Enter Parameter Value" dialog appears, requesting a value for BeforeOrAfter. If I remove BeforeOrAfter DESC from the ORDER BY clause, I don't get the dialog.

Here is the offending query:

SELECT
    d.Scenario,
    e.Event,
    IIF(d.LogTime < e.Time, 'Before','After') AS BeforeOrAfter,
    d.HeartRate
FROM
    Data d INNER JOIN
    Events e ON d.Scenario = e.Scenario
WHERE
    e.Include = Yes
ORDER BY
    d.Scenario,
    e.Id,
    BeforeOrAfter DESC

Question: Why is my AS BeforeOrAfter not being recognized by the ORDER BY clause? Why does it ask me to enter a parameter value for "BeforeOrAfter" when I run this query?

Note: I tried using brackets, single quotes, double quotes, etc., but none of that made any difference.

  • Could you specify which Access version you are using? – Simon B. Mar 18 '10 at 19:30
5

I beleive Access can't handle the alias feature, so you'll have to copy your IIF-block down into the Order By -clause. Or create a subquery (and then you might even find yourself forced to even not be able to use parantheses if your Access version isn't among the newest two or so).

  • 1
    SELECT d.Scenario, e.Event, IIF(d.LogTime < e.Time, 'Before','After') AS BeforeOrAfter, d.HeartRate FROM Data d INNER JOIN Events e ON d.Scenario = e.Scenario WHERE e.Include = Yes ORDER BY d.Scenario, e.Id, IIF(d.LogTime < e.Time, 'Before','After') DESC – clyc Mar 18 '10 at 19:31
  • Thanks, Simon. This is my first time writing queries in Access. I'm quickly learning that it's quite different than SQL Server. – devuxer Mar 18 '10 at 20:09
  • Why would you not expect a different database engine to have a different SQL dialect? For what it's worth, you might find some things easier if you set Access to use "SQL 92" mode, which changes a handful of things to be compatible with SQL Server's SQL dialect (the LIKE wildcards and the syntax for derived tables are the only ones I can think of). – David-W-Fenton Mar 18 '10 at 21:42
  • @David, thanks. Like I said, first writing Access queries, so I didn't know what to expect. Another difference I just discovered: the concatenation operator is "&" rather than "+". I'll take a look at SQL 92. – devuxer Mar 18 '10 at 22:28
  • 1
    The + operator is used for addition of numeric values, and propagates Nulls when used with non-numeric values. This is quite useful in an expression like Mid(("12"+LastName) & (", "+FirstName), 3). – David-W-Fenton Mar 19 '10 at 23:00

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