32

I have a loop in c# that inserts into a table. pretty basic stuff. Is there something insdie the exception object that's thrown when a unique constraint is violated that i can use to see what the offending value is?

Or is there a way to return it in the sql? i have a series of files whose data im loading into tables and i'm banding my head trying to find the dupe.

I know I could slap together something purely IO-based in code that can find it but I'd like something I could use as a more permanent solution.

6
  • 4
    If you are inserting to SQL table using loop you are doing it wrong
    – Tzah Mama
    Jul 14, 2014 at 15:45
  • 4
    It's a bit harsh to say "wrong" without knowing the scenario, but there is likely a better way to do it
    – DavidG
    Jul 14, 2014 at 15:46
  • 2
    Why's it wrong or inefficient? Link me to some literature on the correct way to do it. I'm still learning. Thanks.
    – user609926
    Jul 14, 2014 at 15:51
  • 1
    Making repeated calls the the server can be costly Jul 14, 2014 at 15:58
  • 1
    How do I avoid the repeated server calls? I use ADO.Net so are you talking SqlBulkCon instead? I usually wrap the loop in a using statement with a sqlconnection object. If there's a more efficient way can someone please provide links? It would be greatly appreciated.
    – user609926
    Jul 14, 2014 at 16:01

6 Answers 6

34

What you are looking for is a SqlException, specifically the violation of primary key constraints. You can get this specific error out of this exception by looking at the number property of the exception thrown. This answer is probably relevant to what you need: How to Identify the primary key duplication from a SQL Server 2008 error code?

In summary, it looks like this:

// put this block in your loop
try
{
   // do your insert
}
catch(SqlException ex)
{
   // the exception alone won't tell you why it failed...
   if(ex.Number == 2627) // <-- but this will
   {
      //Violation of primary key. Handle Exception
   }
}

EDIT:

This may be a bit hacky, but you could also just inspect the message component of the exception. Something like this:

if (ex.Message.Contains("UniqueConstraint")) // do stuff
3
  • 1
    May not be a PK error, it could be a unique constraint (which is what the OP says in the question)
    – DavidG
    Jul 14, 2014 at 15:49
  • as long as it catches a constraint which indicates a duplicate record (which could be either) that's good enough for me. I did a little more research and according to sys.messages table the message is 'Violation of %ls constraint '%.*ls'. Cannot insert duplicate key in object '%.*ls'.' which I think covers me in either case. Both of your posts were helpful though.
    – user609926
    Jul 14, 2014 at 16:08
  • 4
    Check also for ex.Number == 2601 stackoverflow.com/questions/31515776/…
    – Jaider
    Sep 17, 2017 at 20:35
22

In addition of Bill Sambrone's answer,

Two error codes are used to check unique key violation

  1. 2601 - Violation in unique index
  2. 2627 - Violation in unique constraint (although it is implemented using unique index)

Either you can use one or both according to your needs:

try
{

}
catch(SqlException ex)
{
   if(ex.Number == 2601) 
   {
      // Violation in unique index
   }
   else if(ex.Number == 2627)
   {
      // Violation in unique constraint
   }
}

OR

try
{

}
catch(SqlException ex)
{
   if(ex.Number == 2601 || ex.Number == 2627)
   {
      // Violation in one on both...
   }
}
2

You could wrap the insert into a stored procedure that first validated there was no duplicates before inserting. That way, you can control exactly what comes back when the value is duplicated.

Additionally, you may find that shifting the insert logic into an SP will allow you do do the bulk insert that you appear to be doing without making repeated calls the the DB.

For an answer to your actual question:

Unique Key Violation in SQL Server - Is it safe to assume Error 2627?

1
2

Here is an alternative using C# 6.0 Exception Filters. The syntax is more concise, easier to maintain and has other advantages as per the article.

try
{
    // Insert record
}
catch (SqlException ex) when (ex.Number == 2601)
{
    // Violation in unique index (record already exists)
}
catch (SqlException ex) when (ex.Number == 2627)
{
    // Violation in unique constraint
}
0

You could do it this way as well:

var result = DbCon.CheckForPrimaryKey(value).ToList();
if(result.Count() == 0)
       DbCon.InsertValue(value);
else
     // Do Nothing   
0

If in the excepted answer, you are not getting the Exception from db.SaveChanges(), then it means you have not defined constraint properly while creating the model.

LINQ don't through Unique Key Constraint if you don't define the constraints properly while creating the Model.

Must check this answer to know, how you can define the constraints in EF Core or EF 6: https://stackoverflow.com/a/72208419/4393351

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