5

I need to create the Cartesian product of a collection of lists. For example I have:

{ {4,3,7}, {1,2,9}, {5,8} }

And I need: {4,1,5}, {4,1,8}, {3,1,5}, {3,1,8}, ... , {7,9,8}

So far I have learned that you can do so using something like this:

var lists = new List<List<int>>
{ 
    new List<int> { 4, 3, 7},
    new List<int> { 1, 2, 9},
    new List<int> { 5, 8},
};

IEnumerable<IEnumerable<int>> empty = new[] { Enumerable.Empty<int>() };
var agg = lists.Aggregate(
    empty,
    (acc, next) 
=>  
    (from ac in acc
    from n in next
    select ac.Concat(new[] {n})));

However initially when I was implementing this, I implemented it like so:

var lists = new List<List<int>>
{ 
    new List<int> { 4, 3, 7},
    new List<int> { 1, 2, 9},
    new List<int> { 5, 8},
};

var agg = lists.Aggregate(
    new List<List<int>>() {new List<int> {}},
    (acc, next) 
=>  
    (from ac in acc
    from n in next
    select ac.Add(n)).ToList());

This specific implementation fails to compile with this error:

An expression of type 'System.Collections.Generic.List' is not allowed in a subsequent from clause in a query expression with source type 'System.Collections.Generic.List>'. Type inference failed in the call to 'SelectMany'.

I'm a little confused by this error message. I can't see why a List is not allowed in that location?

  • 2
    Try Eric Lippert's blog post on the subject: blogs.msdn.com/b/ericlippert/archive/2010/06/28/… – DavidG Jul 14 '14 at 16:27
  • do you know up front how many lists there will be or is it N-number of lists? – terrybozzio Jul 14 '14 at 16:32
  • @DavidG Thx for the linq. I've already read that article and I think that's how I remembered to use Aggregate. My question is not about how to do the cartesian product but about the error mentioned above. – Farhad Alizadeh Noori Jul 14 '14 at 17:16
  • @terrybozzio It's any number of items(N items). – Farhad Alizadeh Noori Jul 14 '14 at 17:16
5

The first part of the error message is somewhat misleading. The following will compile and work just fine:

var agg = lists.Aggregate(
    new List<List<int>>(),
    (acc, next) 
=>  
    (from ac in acc
    from n in next
    // select ac.Add(n)).ToList());
    select ac.Concat(new[] {n}).ToList()).ToList());

The real problem is with select ac.Add(n). A select clause must return a value (in this case a List<int>), but your call to List<T>.Add modifies the original list and returns void instead.

Under the hood, LINQ tries to transform this LINQ expression into (among other things) a call to Enumerable.SelectMany. One of the arguments the compiler passes is a generated lambda expression that returns ac.Add(n) (i.e. void). The compiler tries to infer the type of the generated lambda based on the available overloads of SelectMany, but there is no compatible overload and so the type of the lambda can't be determined. Hence the error message "Type inference failed in the call to 'SelectMany'.".

Like Add, most List<T> methods aren't generally suitable for functional programming with LINQ, which is why the preferred solution relies only on IEnumerable<T> and its LINQ-related extension methods.

  • Very good answer. I suspected this was the case but couldn't connect the dots as you did there. It makes sense. I'll wait for more answers in case there is more information to be had :) – Farhad Alizadeh Noori Jul 14 '14 at 17:48

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