154

What's the difference between raise and raise from in Python?

try:
    raise ValueError
except Exception as e:
    raise IndexError

which yields

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "tmp.py", line 2, in <module>
    raise ValueError
ValueError

During handling of the above exception, another exception occurred:

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "tmp.py", line 4, in <module>
    raise IndexError
IndexError

and

try:
    raise ValueError
except Exception as e:
    raise IndexError from e

which yields

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "tmp.py", line 2, in <module>
    raise ValueError
ValueError

The above exception was the direct cause of the following exception:

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "tmp.py", line 4, in <module>
    raise IndexError from e
IndexError
180

The difference is that when you use from, the __cause__ attribute is set and the message states that the exception was directly caused by. If you omit the from then no __cause__ is set, but the __context__ attribute may be set as well, and the traceback then shows the context as during handling something else happened.

Setting the __context__ happens if you used raise in an exception handler; if you used raise anywhere else no __context__ is set either.

If a __cause__ is set, a __suppress_context__ = True flag is also set on the exception; when __suppress_context__ is set to True, the __context__ is ignored when printing a traceback.

When raising from a exception handler where you don't want to show the context (don't want a during handling another exception happened message), then use raise ... from None to set __suppress_context__ to True.

In other words, Python sets a context on exceptions so you can introspect where an exception was raised, letting you see if another exception was replaced by it. You can also add a cause to an exception, making the traceback explicit about the other exception (use different wording), and the context is ignored (but can still be introspected when debugging). Using raise ... from None lets you suppress the context being printed.

See the raise statement documenation:

The from clause is used for exception chaining: if given, the second expression must be another exception class or instance, which will then be attached to the raised exception as the __cause__ attribute (which is writable). If the raised exception is not handled, both exceptions will be printed:

>>> try:
...     print(1 / 0)
... except Exception as exc:
...     raise RuntimeError("Something bad happened") from exc
...
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 2, in <module>
ZeroDivisionError: int division or modulo by zero

The above exception was the direct cause of the following exception:

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 4, in <module>
RuntimeError: Something bad happened

A similar mechanism works implicitly if an exception is raised inside an exception handler or a finally clause: the previous exception is then attached as the new exception’s __context__ attribute:

>>> try:
...     print(1 / 0)
... except:
...     raise RuntimeError("Something bad happened")
...
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 2, in <module>
ZeroDivisionError: int division or modulo by zero

During handling of the above exception, another exception occurred:

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 4, in <module>
RuntimeError: Something bad happened

Also see the Built-in Exceptions documentation for details on the context and cause information attached to exceptions.

  • 8
    Is there any reason to explicitly chain the exceptions using from and __cause__ in lieu of the implicit __context__? Are there any cases where one would attach a different exception than the one caught by the except? – darkfeline Jul 16 '14 at 2:45
  • 7
    @darkfeline: Lets say your database API supports opening databases from various sources, including the web and disk. Your API will always raise a DatabaseError if opening the database fails. But if the failure is the result of a IOError because a file failed to open or a HTTPError because a URL failed to work then that is context you want to include explicitly, so the developer using the API can debug why this is. At that moment you use raise DatabaseError from original_exception. – Martijn Pieters Jul 16 '14 at 8:00
  • 3
    @darkfeline: If that developer is wrapping the use of the database API in their own API and wanted to pass on that IOError or HTTPError on to their consumers, then they'd have to use raise NewException from databaseexception.__cause__, now using a different exception from the DatabaseException that they just caught. – Martijn Pieters Jul 16 '14 at 8:03
  • 2
    @dan3: no, there isn't. Exception chaining is purely a Python 3 feature. – Martijn Pieters Apr 9 '15 at 20:35
  • 4
    @laike9m: you mean when you are handling exception foo, and want to raise a new exception bar? Then you can use raise bar from foo and have Python state that foo directly caused bar. If you don't use from foo, then Python will still print both, but state that during handling foo, bar was raised, Different message, intended to flag a possible bug in the error handling. – Martijn Pieters Aug 14 '16 at 9:05

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