1

I am trying to find out which formats a date of birth should be in a empty field in a PDF using iText,

I can stamp the field with a value but then need to know what the date of birth must be.

I figured that if I get out the length of the field so I know how the format should be, because the formats can be:

YYYYMMDDNNNN (14 digits)

YYYYMMDD (10 digits)

YYMMDD (8 digits)

The field has a fixed number of digits, if I stamp the field with too many numbers, then the numbers that fall outside the field disappears.

How do I find the length of the empty field?

how i stamp the field:

private void stampValuesOnFields()
{
  try
  {
    PdfReader reader = new PdfReader(System.getProperty("com.sun.aas.instanceRoot") + "/PDF/Templates/org.pdf");
    String path = System.getProperty("com.sun.aas.instanceRoot") + "/PDF/Generated PDF/" + "new.pdf";
    PdfStamper stamper = new PdfStamper(reader, new FileOutputStream(path));

    stamper.getAcroFields().setField("field", "19321029");
  }catch(Exception e)
  {}
}

Here are pdfs I try to fill in, but I want it to work for other pdf files with other formats of Birthday:

http://www.korkortsportalen.se/upload/dokument/blanketter/foretag/tstrk1031_lakarintyg_diabetes.pdf ( the field under "Sökandens personnummer" )

  • There are different ways one can limit the number of characters added to a field. The most common way is to define the rectangle in such a way that it only accommodates for a limited number of characters without defining that number. A word such as "itinerary" takes less space than "monuments". Both have 9 characters, but the m's and the n's take more space than the i's and the r's. Show us your PDF and we can give a more conclusive answer to your question. Right now, the question is unanswerable. – Bruno Lowagie Jul 15 '14 at 9:50
  • Of course, if you want to make sure that the text fits the text field. You can always change the font size to 0. When you add text to a text field with font size 0, the font will adapt in order to make sure that the text fits. For instance: when you add "19321029" the actual font size could be 10, but when you add "321029" the actual font size could be 12. – Bruno Lowagie Jul 15 '14 at 9:52
  • I have added the pdf in my question. The problem is that I want it to work with pdf files with other formats of Birthday – Johan Nordli Jul 15 '14 at 9:58
  • Is Intygsdatum the birth date? Also: the person who created this form has named all fields in a similar way: starting with Falt_. That's annoying for people who want to know which field corresponds with which data. – Bruno Lowagie Jul 15 '14 at 10:22
  • no it is the field under "Sökandens personnummer", it's a Swedish authority that created the pdf so it's nothing I can do about it unfortunately :( – Johan Nordli Jul 15 '14 at 10:24
1

You're in luck. Your field defines a /MaxLen which means that you can find out the maximum length of the field. In the following screen shot, you can see the properties of the field / annotation dictionary for field Falt__41 (which can be used to add the Sökandens personnummer):

enter image description here

As you can see, this field can contain a maximum of 12 characters. Moreover, the /Ff (fields flags) value is 29360128 or binary value: 1110000000000000000000000. This means that the following flags are active: do not spell check, do not scroll, and comb. The comb flag makes that whatever you enter, the characters will be evenly distributed over the available width. In this case, every character will take 1/12 of the available width.

Now how do you retrieve the /MaxLen value? That's more or less explained in my book, but I'm writing the following lines from memory:

AcroFields form = reader.getAcroFields();
AcroFields.Item item = form.getFieldItem("Falt__41");
PdfDictionary field = item.getMerged(0);
PdfNumber maxlen = field.getAsNumber(PdfName.MAXLEN);

Now you can get the int value of maxlen.

Important note: not every field has a /MaxLen value.

  • Thanks, a really beautiful answer. Thanks for taking your time, you are awesome! – Johan Nordli Jul 15 '14 at 11:20

Your Answer

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.