159

How can we measure the time elapsed for running a function in Swift? I am trying to display the elapsed time like this: "Elapsed time is .05 seconds". Saw that in Java, we can use System.nanoTime(), is there any equivalent methods are available in Swift to accomplish this?

Please have a look at the sample program:

func isPrime(_ number: Int) -> Bool {
    var i = 0;
    for i=2; i<number; i++ {
        if number % i == 0, i != 0 {
            return false
        }
    }
    return true
}

var number = 5915587277

if isPrime(number) {
    print("Prime number")
} else {
    print("NOT a prime number")
}
6
  • 1
    it is unrelated to your time-measuring issue, but the loop can be stopped at sqrt(number) instead of number, and you can save a little more time – but there are much more ideas optimising seeking primes.
    – holex
    Jul 15, 2014 at 10:20
  • @holex Please ignore the algorithm used. I am trying to figure out how we can measure the elapsed time?
    – Vaquita
    Jul 15, 2014 at 10:25
  • 1
    you can use NSDate objects and you can measure the difference between them.
    – holex
    Jul 15, 2014 at 10:27
  • 4
    If you are using XCode, I recommend you use the new performance testing feature. It does all the heavy lifting for you and even runs it multiple times and gives you the average time with its standard deviation...
    – Roshan
    Jul 15, 2014 at 12:27
  • 1
    @dumbledad You can measure performance of whole blocks directly in unit tests. For example, see this. If you want to break a run down further(say, line by line code), check out Time Profiler which is part of Instruments. This is much more powerful and comprehensive.
    – Roshan
    Oct 10, 2015 at 13:09

20 Answers 20

277

Here's a Swift function I wrote to measure Project Euler problems in Swift

As of Swift 3, there is now a version of Grand Central Dispatch that is "swiftified". So the correct answer is probably to use the DispatchTime API.

My function would look something like:

// Swift 3
func evaluateProblem(problemNumber: Int, problemBlock: () -> Int) -> Answer
{
    print("Evaluating problem \(problemNumber)")

    let start = DispatchTime.now() // <<<<<<<<<< Start time
    let myGuess = problemBlock()
    let end = DispatchTime.now()   // <<<<<<<<<<   end time

    let theAnswer = self.checkAnswer(answerNum: "\(problemNumber)", guess: myGuess)

    let nanoTime = end.uptimeNanoseconds - start.uptimeNanoseconds // <<<<< Difference in nano seconds (UInt64)
    let timeInterval = Double(nanoTime) / 1_000_000_000 // Technically could overflow for long running tests

    print("Time to evaluate problem \(problemNumber): \(timeInterval) seconds")
    return theAnswer
}

Old answer

For Swift 1 and 2, my function uses NSDate:

// Swift 1
func evaluateProblem(problemNumber: Int, problemBlock: () -> Int) -> Answer
{
    println("Evaluating problem \(problemNumber)")

    let start = NSDate() // <<<<<<<<<< Start time
    let myGuess = problemBlock()
    let end = NSDate()   // <<<<<<<<<<   end time

    let theAnswer = self.checkAnswer(answerNum: "\(problemNumber)", guess: myGuess)

    let timeInterval: Double = end.timeIntervalSinceDate(start) // <<<<< Difference in seconds (double)

    println("Time to evaluate problem \(problemNumber): \(timeInterval) seconds")
    return theAnswer
}

Note that using NSdate for timing functions is discouraged: "The system time may decrease due to synchronization with external time references or due to an explicit user change of the clock.".

19
  • This appears to give results good up to around +/-2microsec. Maybe that varies by platform, however. Aug 14, 2014 at 15:28
  • 6
    swift3 doesn't work for me, it returns 0.0114653027 which i know for a fact that is not true, the one with dates returns 4.77720803022385sec Nov 17, 2016 at 17:13
  • 7
    Unfortunately not. The uptime is completely out for some reason. I have a test which says took 1004959766 nanoseconds (about a second), but was definitely running for about 40 seconds. I used Date alongside, and sure enough that reports 41.87 seconds. I don't know what uptimeNanoseconds is doing, but it's not reporting the correct duration.
    – jowie
    Dec 5, 2016 at 15:10
  • 3
    Sorry for the big edit, prioritizing your newer solution, but I would even recommend to delete your NSDate code entirely: it's totally unreliable to use NSDate: NSDate is based on system clock, which can change at any time due to many different reasons, such as network time sync (NTP) updating the clock (happens often to adjust for drift), DST adjustments, leap seconds, and user manual adjustment of the clock. Additionally, you can't publish anymore on the AppStore any app using Swift 1: Swift 3 is the bare minimum. So there is no point to keep your NSDate code other than to say "don't do it".
    – Cœur
    Jan 29, 2019 at 6:06
  • 1
    @Cœur your criticism of the NSDate version is valid (except DST changes won't affect NSDate which is always in GMT), and your edit to reverse the order is definitely an improvement.
    – JeremyP
    May 26, 2019 at 15:49
78

This is a handy timer class based on CoreFoundations CFAbsoluteTime:

import CoreFoundation

class ParkBenchTimer {
    let startTime: CFAbsoluteTime
    var endTime: CFAbsoluteTime?

    init() {
        startTime = CFAbsoluteTimeGetCurrent()
    }

    func stop() -> CFAbsoluteTime {
        endTime = CFAbsoluteTimeGetCurrent()

        return duration!
    }

    var duration: CFAbsoluteTime? {
        if let endTime = endTime {
            return endTime - startTime
        } else {
            return nil
        }
    }
}

You can use it like this:

let timer = ParkBenchTimer()

// ... a long runnig task ...

print("The task took \(timer.stop()) seconds.")
6
  • 4
    "Repeated calls to this function do not guarantee monotonically increasing results." according to its documentation. May 24, 2016 at 21:24
  • 9
    More context: "Repeated calls to this function do not guarantee monotonically increasing results. The system time may decrease due to synchronization with external time references or due to an explicit user change of the clock."
    – Klaas
    May 25, 2016 at 11:35
  • Developer should take "synchronization with external time references" and "an explicit user change of the clock" into account. Did you mean that it's impossible for the two situation to happen? May 25, 2016 at 16:19
  • @FranklinYu no, I just wanted to state these are the two possible reasons. If you rely on always getting monotonically increasing values there are other options.
    – Klaas
    May 25, 2016 at 16:29
  • sometimes I wish to measure a short period of time; if synchronization happens during that, I may end up with negative time. There is actually mach_absolute_time which does not suffer from this problem, so I am wondering why that one is not widely known. Maybe just because it is not well documented. May 25, 2016 at 17:06
64

Use clock, ProcessInfo.systemUptime, or DispatchTime for simple start-up time.


There are, as far as I know, at least ten ways to measure elapsed time:

Monotonic Clock based:

  1. ProcessInfo.systemUptime.
  2. mach_absolute_time with mach_timebase_info as mentioned in this answer.
  3. clock() in POSIX standard.
  4. times() in POSIX standard. (Too complicated since we need to consider user-time v.s. system-time, and child processes are involved.)
  5. DispatchTime (a wrapper around Mach time API) as mentioned by JeremyP in accepted answer.
  6. CACurrentMediaTime().

Wall Clock based:

(never use those for metrics: see below why)

  1. NSDate/Date as mentioned by others.
  2. CFAbsoluteTime as mentioned by others.
  3. DispatchWallTime.
  4. gettimeofday() in POSIX standard.

Option 1, 2 and 3 are elaborated below.

Option 1: Process Info API in Foundation

do {
    let info = ProcessInfo.processInfo
    let begin = info.systemUptime
    // do something
    let diff = (info.systemUptime - begin)
}

where diff:NSTimeInterval is the elapsed time by seconds.

Option 2: Mach C API

do {
    var info = mach_timebase_info(numer: 0, denom: 0)
    mach_timebase_info(&info)
    let begin = mach_absolute_time()
    // do something
    let diff = Double(mach_absolute_time() - begin) * Double(info.numer) / Double(info.denom)
}

where diff:Double is the elapsed time by nano-seconds.

Option 3: POSIX clock API

do {
    let begin = clock()
    // do something
    let diff = Double(clock() - begin) / Double(CLOCKS_PER_SEC)
}

where diff:Double is the elapsed time by seconds.

Why Not Wall-Clock Time for Elapsed Time?

In documentation of CFAbsoluteTimeGetCurrent:

Repeated calls to this function do not guarantee monotonically increasing results.

Reason is similar to currentTimeMillis vs nanoTime in Java:

You can't use the one for the other purpose. The reason is that no computer's clock is perfect; it always drifts and occasionally needs to be corrected. This correction might either happen manually, or in the case of most machines, there's a process that runs and continually issues small corrections to the system clock ("wall clock"). These tend to happen often. Another such correction happens whenever there is a leap second.

Here CFAbsoluteTime provides wall clock time instead of start-up time. NSDate is wall clock time as well.

5
  • the best answer - but what, the hell, is the best approach to take?!
    – Fattie
    Dec 16, 2016 at 16:55
  • 1
    Option 5 suited best to me. If you considering multi-platform code try this one. Both Darwin and Glibc libraries have clock() function. Jul 20, 2017 at 10:51
  • For the System Clock based solutions: I had success with ProcessInfo.processInfo.systemUptime, mach_absolute_time(), DispatchTime.now() and CACurrentMediaTime(). But the solution with clock() was not converting to seconds properly. So I would advise to update your first sentence to: "Use ProcessInfo.systemUptime or DispatchTime for accurate start-up time."
    – Cœur
    Jan 29, 2019 at 10:19
  • Great answer. Explained everything.
    – KSR
    Nov 17, 2020 at 9:57
  • Great answer. If I may, option 2 could be optimised using clock_gettime_nsec_np(CLOCK_UPTIME_RAW) which does the time base conversion for you and provides nanosec value (see manpagez.com/man/3/clock_gettime_nsec_np)
    – oscaroscar
    May 17, 2021 at 15:09
53

Swift 4 shortest answer:

let startingPoint = Date()
//  ... intensive task
print("\(startingPoint.timeIntervalSinceNow * -1) seconds elapsed")

It will print you something like 1.02107906341553 seconds elapsed (time of course will vary depending on the task, I'm just showing this for you guys to see the decimal precision level for this measurement).

Hope it helps someone in Swift 4 from now on!

Update

If you want to have a generic way of testing portions of code, I'd suggest the next snippet:

func measureTime(for closure: @autoclosure () -> Any) {
    let start = CFAbsoluteTimeGetCurrent()
    closure()
    let diff = CFAbsoluteTimeGetCurrent() - start
    print("Took \(diff) seconds")
}

Usage

measureTime(for: <insert method signature here>)

Console log

Took xx.xxxxx seconds
4
  • 2
    Can someone explain why * -1? Jun 11, 2018 at 3:33
  • 3
    @MaksimKniazev Because it's negative value, people want positive one!
    – thachnb
    Jun 11, 2018 at 7:07
  • 2
    @thachnb I had no idea "startingPoint.timeIntervalSinceNow" produces negative value ... Jun 11, 2018 at 7:46
  • 3
    @MaksimKniazev Apple says that: If the date object is earlier than the current date and time, this property’s value is negative.
    – Peter Guan
    Jul 20, 2018 at 6:08
19

Just Copy and Paste this function. Written in swift 5. Copying JeremyP here.

func calculateTime(block : (() -> Void)) {
        let start = DispatchTime.now()
        block()
        let end = DispatchTime.now()
        let nanoTime = end.uptimeNanoseconds - start.uptimeNanoseconds
        let timeInterval = Double(nanoTime) / 1_000_000_000
        print("Time: \(timeInterval) seconds")
    }

Use it like

calculateTime {
     exampleFunc()// function whose execution time to be calculated
}
1
  • I tried to do something like this but it ends up into arithmetic overflow error! Apr 26, 2021 at 17:58
15
let start = NSDate()

for index in 1...10000 {
    // do nothing
}

let elapsed = start.timeIntervalSinceNow

// elapsed is a negative value.
2
  • 3
    abs(start.timeIntervalSinceNow)//<--positive value
    – Sentry.co
    Sep 9, 2016 at 22:04
  • pretty much the most straight forward solution I've seen, thank you
    – MiladiuM
    Oct 17, 2016 at 10:58
7

You could create a time function for measuring you calls. I am inspired by Klaas' answer.

func time <A> (f: @autoclosure () -> A) -> (result:A, duration: String) {
    let startTime = CFAbsoluteTimeGetCurrent()
    let result = f()
    let endTime = CFAbsoluteTimeGetCurrent()
    return (result, "Elapsed time is \(endTime - startTime) seconds.")
}

This function would allow you to call it like this time (isPrime(7)) which would return a tuple containing the result and a string description of the elapsed time.

If you only wish the elapsed time you can do this time (isPrime(7)).duration

1
  • 3
    "Repeated calls to this function do not guarantee monotonically increasing results." according to documentation. May 24, 2016 at 2:59
4

It looks like iOS 13 introduced a new API to use with DispatchTime that removes a need to calculate the difference between two timestamps manually.

distance(to:)

let start: DispatchTime = .now()
heavyTaskToMeasure()
let duration = start.distance(to: .now())
print(duration) 
// prints: nanoseconds(NUMBER_OF_NANOSECONDS_BETWEEN_TWO_TIMESTAMPS)

Sadly the documentation is not provided, but after doing some tests it looks like the .nanoseconds case is always returned.

With a simple extension you could convert the DispatchTimeInterval to TimeInterval. credit

extension TimeInterval {
    init?(dispatchTimeInterval: DispatchTimeInterval) {
        switch dispatchTimeInterval {
        case .seconds(let value):
            self = Double(value)
        case .milliseconds(let value):
            self = Double(value) / 1_000
        case .microseconds(let value):
            self = Double(value) / 1_000_000
        case .nanoseconds(let value):
            self = Double(value) / 1_000_000_000
        case .never:
            return nil
        }
    }
}
3

Simple helper function for measuring execution time with closure.

func printExecutionTime(withTag tag: String, of closure: () -> ()) {
    let start = CACurrentMediaTime()
    closure()
    print("#\(tag) - execution took \(CACurrentMediaTime() - start) seconds")
}

Usage:

printExecutionTime(withTag: "Init") {
    // Do your work here
}

Result: #Init - execution took 1.00104497105349 seconds

2

you can measure the nanoseconds like e.g. this:

let startDate: NSDate = NSDate()

// your long procedure

let endDate: NSDate = NSDate()
let dateComponents: NSDateComponents = NSCalendar(calendarIdentifier: NSCalendarIdentifierGregorian).components(NSCalendarUnit.CalendarUnitNanosecond, fromDate: startDate, toDate: endDate, options: NSCalendarOptions(0))
println("runtime is nanosecs : \(dateComponents.nanosecond)")
6
  • I just ran this with no code placed in the "// your long procedure", and it gave a result of 240900993, which is 0.24 seconds. Aug 14, 2014 at 15:21
  • instantiating an NSCalendar is expensive procedure, but you can do it before you start to run your procedure, so it won't be added to your long procedure's runtime... bear in mind calling creating an NSDate instance and calling –components(_:, fromDate:) method still takes time, so probably you will never get 0.0 nanoseconds.
    – holex
    Aug 14, 2014 at 15:29
  • From the looks of the NSCalendar constructor, it appears that it may not be possible to create it ahead of time (startDate is a required input). It's kind of surprising that it seems to be such a hog. Aug 14, 2014 at 15:41
  • you may do this (my updated answer), the measured time without any additional procedure is about 6.9 microseconds on my device.
    – holex
    Aug 14, 2014 at 15:55
  • Cool, thanks. The basic procedure is now similar to JeremyP's answer, but the reporting is different. Aug 14, 2014 at 16:04
2

I use this:

public class Stopwatch {
    public init() { }
    private var start_: NSTimeInterval = 0.0;
    private var end_: NSTimeInterval = 0.0;

    public func start() {
        start_ = NSDate().timeIntervalSince1970;
    }

    public func stop() {
        end_ = NSDate().timeIntervalSince1970;
    }

    public func durationSeconds() -> NSTimeInterval {
        return end_ - start_;
    }
}

I don't know if it's more or less accurate than previously posted. But the seconds have a lot of decimals and seem to catch small code changes in algorithms like QuickSort using swap() vs. implementing swap urself etc.

Remember to crank up your build optimizations when testing performance:

Swift compiler optimizations

2

Here is my try for the simplest answer:

let startTime = Date().timeIntervalSince1970  // 1512538946.5705 seconds

// time passes (about 10 seconds)

let endTime = Date().timeIntervalSince1970    // 1512538956.57195 seconds
let elapsedTime = endTime - startTime         // 10.0014500617981 seconds

Notes

  • startTime and endTime are of the type TimeInterval, which is just a typealias for Double, so it is easy to convert it to an Int or whatever. Time is measured in seconds with sub-millisecond precision.
  • See also DateInterval, which includes an actual start and end time.
  • Using the time since 1970 is similar to Java timestamps.
1
  • easiest way, would like it in two strings, second is let elapsedTime = Date().timeIntervalSince1970 - startTime
    – FreeGor
    Feb 19, 2018 at 11:26
1

I have borrowed the idea from Klaas to create a lightweight struct to measure running and interval time:

Code Usage:

var timer = RunningTimer.init()
// Code to be timed
print("Running: \(timer) ") // Gives time interval
// Second code to be timed
print("Running: \(timer) ") // Gives final time

The stop function does not have to be called, as the print function will give the time lapsed. It may be called repeatedly to get the time lapsed. But to stop the timer at certain point in the code use timer.stop() it may also be used to return the time in seconds: let seconds = timer.stop() After the timer is stopped the interval timer will not, so the print("Running: \(timer) ") will give the correct time even after a few lines of code.

Following is the code for RunningTimer. It is tested for Swift 2.1:

import CoreFoundation
// Usage:    var timer = RunningTimer.init()
// Start:    timer.start() to restart the timer
// Stop:     timer.stop() returns the time and stops the timer
// Duration: timer.duration returns the time
// May also be used with print(" \(timer) ")

struct RunningTimer: CustomStringConvertible {
    var begin:CFAbsoluteTime
    var end:CFAbsoluteTime

    init() {
        begin = CFAbsoluteTimeGetCurrent()
        end = 0
    }
    mutating func start() {
        begin = CFAbsoluteTimeGetCurrent()
        end = 0
    }
    mutating func stop() -> Double {
        if (end == 0) { end = CFAbsoluteTimeGetCurrent() }
        return Double(end - begin)
    }
    var duration:CFAbsoluteTime {
        get {
            if (end == 0) { return CFAbsoluteTimeGetCurrent() - begin } 
            else { return end - begin }
        }
    }
    var description:String {
    let time = duration
    if (time > 100) {return " \(time/60) min"}
    else if (time < 1e-6) {return " \(time*1e9) ns"}
    else if (time < 1e-3) {return " \(time*1e6) µs"}
    else if (time < 1) {return " \(time*1000) ms"}
    else {return " \(time) s"}
    }
}
1

Wrap it up in a completion block for easy use.

public class func secElapsed(completion: () -> Void) {
    let startDate: NSDate = NSDate()
    completion()
    let endDate: NSDate = NSDate()
    let timeInterval: Double = endDate.timeIntervalSinceDate(startDate)
    println("seconds: \(timeInterval)")
}
1

The recommend way to check elapsed time/performance is using the measure function that is available in XCTests.

It isn't reliable to write your own measure blocks, since the performance (and therefore execution/elapsed time) of a block of code is influenced by e.g. CPU caches.

The second time a function is invoked, would likely be quicker than the first time it is invoked, although it can vary a few %. Therefore 'benchmarking' by using your own closures (given all over the place here) by executing it once, can give different results than your code being executed in production by real users.

The measure function invokes your block of code several times, mimicking the performance/elapsed time of your code like it is used in production (at least gives more accurate results).

0

This is the snippet I came up with and it seems to work for me on my Macbook with Swift 4.

Never tested on other systems, but I thought it's worth sharing anyway.

typealias MonotonicTS = UInt64
let monotonic_now: () -> MonotonicTS = mach_absolute_time

let time_numer: UInt64
let time_denom: UInt64
do {
    var time_info = mach_timebase_info(numer: 0, denom: 0)
    mach_timebase_info(&time_info)
    time_numer = UInt64(time_info.numer)
    time_denom = UInt64(time_info.denom)
}

// returns time interval in seconds
func monotonic_diff(from: MonotonicTS, to: MonotonicTS) -> TimeInterval {
    let diff = (to - from)
    let nanos = Double(diff * time_numer / time_denom)
    return nanos / 1_000_000_000
}

func seconds_elapsed(since: MonotonicTS) -> TimeInterval {
    return monotonic_diff(from: since, to:monotonic_now())
}

Here's an example of how to use it:

let t1 = monotonic_now()
// .. some code to run ..
let elapsed = seconds_elapsed(since: t1)
print("Time elapsed: \(elapsed*1000)ms")

Another way is to do it more explicitly:

let t1 = monotonic_now()
// .. some code to run ..
let t2 = monotonic_now()
let elapsed = monotonic_diff(from: t1, to: t2)
print("Time elapsed: \(elapsed*1000)ms")
0

This is how I wrote it.

 func measure<T>(task: () -> T) -> Double {
        let startTime = CFAbsoluteTimeGetCurrent()
        task()
        let endTime = CFAbsoluteTimeGetCurrent()
        let result = endTime - startTime
        return result
    }

To measure a algorithm use it like that.

let time = measure {
    var array = [2,4,5,2,5,7,3,123,213,12]
    array.sorted()
}

print("Block is running \(time) seconds.")
1
  • How accurate is that time? Because I used timer before to update every 0.1 seconds. I compared this answer and one with timer and result from this answer is 0.1 seconds is more then with timer.. Jun 11, 2018 at 3:31
0

Static Swift3 class for basic function timing. It will keep track of each timer by name. Call it like this at the point you want to start measuring:

Stopwatch.start(name: "PhotoCapture")

Call this to capture and print the time elapsed:

Stopwatch.timeElapsed(name: "PhotoCapture")

This is the output: *** PhotoCapture elapsed ms: 1402.415125 There is a "useNanos" parameter if you want to use nanos. Please feel free to change as needed.

   class Stopwatch: NSObject {

  private static var watches = [String:TimeInterval]()

  private static func intervalFromMachTime(time: TimeInterval, useNanos: Bool) -> TimeInterval {
     var info = mach_timebase_info()
     guard mach_timebase_info(&info) == KERN_SUCCESS else { return -1 }
     let currentTime = mach_absolute_time()
     let nanos = currentTime * UInt64(info.numer) / UInt64(info.denom)
     if useNanos {
        return (TimeInterval(nanos) - time)
     }
     else {
        return (TimeInterval(nanos) - time) / TimeInterval(NSEC_PER_MSEC)
     }
  }

  static func start(name: String) {
     var info = mach_timebase_info()
     guard mach_timebase_info(&info) == KERN_SUCCESS else { return }
     let currentTime = mach_absolute_time()
     let nanos = currentTime * UInt64(info.numer) / UInt64(info.denom)
     watches[name] = TimeInterval(nanos)
  }

  static func timeElapsed(name: String) {
     return timeElapsed(name: name, useNanos: false)
  }

  static func timeElapsed(name: String, useNanos: Bool) {
     if let start = watches[name] {
        let unit = useNanos ? "nanos" : "ms"
        print("*** \(name) elapsed \(unit): \(intervalFromMachTime(time: start, useNanos: useNanos))")
     }
  }

}

1
  • Your whole work with mach_timebase_info is already implemented better than you did in the source code of ProcessInfo.processInfo.systemUptime. So simply do watches[name] = ProcessInfo.processInfo.systemUptime. And * TimeInterval(NSEC_PER_MSEC) if you want nanos.
    – Cœur
    Jan 29, 2019 at 11:04
0

Based on Franklin Yu answer and Cœur comments

Details

  • Xcode 10.1 (10B61)
  • Swift 4.2

Solution 1

measure(_:)

Solution 2

import Foundation

class Measurer<T: Numeric> {

    private let startClosure: ()->(T)
    private let endClosure: (_ beginningTime: T)->(T)

    init (startClosure: @escaping ()->(T), endClosure: @escaping (_ beginningTime: T)->(T)) {
        self.startClosure = startClosure
        self.endClosure = endClosure
    }

    init (getCurrentTimeClosure: @escaping ()->(T)) {
        startClosure = getCurrentTimeClosure
        endClosure = { beginningTime in
            return getCurrentTimeClosure() - beginningTime
        }
    }

    func measure(closure: ()->()) -> T {
        let value = startClosure()
        closure()
        return endClosure(value)
    }
}

Usage of solution 2

// Sample with ProcessInfo class

m = Measurer { ProcessInfo.processInfo.systemUptime }
time = m.measure {
    _ = (1...1000).map{_ in Int(arc4random()%100)}
}
print("ProcessInfo: \(time)")

// Sample with Posix clock API

m = Measurer(startClosure: {Double(clock())}) { (Double(clock()) - $0 ) / Double(CLOCKS_PER_SEC) }
time = m.measure {
    _ = (1...1000).map{_ in Int(arc4random()%100)}
}
print("POSIX: \(time)")
3
  • Not sure why we would need to use variable implementations. Using Date to measure anything is extremely discouraged (but systemUptime or clock() are OK). As for tests, we have measure(_:) already.
    – Cœur
    Jan 29, 2019 at 10:32
  • 1
    Another note: why making the closure optional?
    – Cœur
    Jan 29, 2019 at 11:41
  • @Cœur you right! Thanks for your comments. I will update post later. Jan 29, 2019 at 11:48
0

Solution similar to C#'s Stopwatch class.

Usage:

let s = Stopwatch()
s.start()
    
for _ in 1..<5 {
    Thread.sleep(forTimeInterval: 5)
    print("Sleeped \(s.elapsedS) S")
}
    
s.stop()
print("Sleeped \(s.elapsedS) s")

result:

Sleeped 5.001374235 s
Sleeped 10.002803108 s
Sleeped 15.003942841 s
Sleeped 20.004250347000003 s
Sleeped 20.004299962 s

Code:


public class Stopwatch {
    public var elapsedS : Double {
        return elapsedMs/1000
    }
    
    public var elapsedMs: Double {
        guard let startTime = startTime else { return 0 }
        
        if isGoing {
            let end = DispatchTime.now()
            let nanoTime = end.uptimeNanoseconds - startTime.uptimeNanoseconds
            
            return Double(nanoTime) / 1000000
        }
        
        if let endTime = endTime {
            let nanoTime = endTime.uptimeNanoseconds - startTime.uptimeNanoseconds
            return Double(nanoTime) / 1000000
        }
        
        return 0
    }
    
    private var startTime : DispatchTime? = nil
    private var endTime : DispatchTime? = nil
    private var isGoing = false
    
    public init () { }
    
    public func start() -> Stopwatch {
        isGoing = true
        startTime = DispatchTime.now()
        
        return self
    }
    
    public func stop() {
        endTime = DispatchTime.now()
        isGoing = false
    }
    
    public func printS(_ str : String? = nil){
        if let str = str {
            print("\(str): \(elapsedS)")
        }
        else {
            print("\(elapsedS)")
        }
    }
    
    public func printMs(_ str : String? = nil){
        if let str = str {
            print("\(str): \(elapsedMs)")
        }
        else {
            print("\(elapsedMs)")
        }
    }
}
3
  • My employee would scream at this code, please read the Swift style guide
    – J. Doe
    Aug 9, 2021 at 20:04
  • @J.Doe this code was written at the period when I have started to learn swift. So I have used C# code style some time at those period. Do you have any issues with code EXCEPT code style? All is ok? If it is, be more patient to other people :) Aug 9, 2021 at 21:32
  • It isn't asked to much that Swift Q&A are answered in Swift style, if everyone would write Swift in their own style or with styles from other languages, it would be a mess.
    – J. Doe
    Aug 10, 2021 at 10:44

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