5

After some problems with differences between JSE versions, I'm trying to log the Java compiler version used to compile (it's Groovy 2.1.9, Grails 2.3.8, Java 1.7.0_60 in fact).

After some rummaging around, I've constructed this piece of code to read the leading bytes of the class - see /http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Java_class_file#General_layout

(change the path to the class to match the package name):

class CompilerVersionSupport {

  public static String getVersion() {
    String classAsPath = 'com/my/organisation/CompilerVersionSupport.class';
    InputStream stream = (new CompilerVersionSupport()).getClass().getClassLoader().getResourceAsStream(classAsPath);
    DataInputStream ins = new DataInputStream (stream)

    assert( ins.readUnsignedShort() == 0xcafe )    
    assert( ins.readUnsignedShort() == 0xbabe )
    int minor = ins.readUnsignedShort();
    int major = ins.readUnsignedShort();
    ins.close();
    int javaVersion = major - 44 
    return "1.$javaVersion"
    }     
}

Trouble is, it returns 1.5.

What could be going on?

  • Charles
5
  • How did you compile? Did you specify any target version?
    – Syam S
    Jul 15, 2014 at 11:48
  • In BuildConfig.groovy: grails.project.target.level = 1.7
    – CharlesW
    Jul 15, 2014 at 15:31
  • This question has come up before (stackoverflow.com/questions/14176878/…), but wasn't really answered. Totally spit-balling here, but have you tried setting both grails.project.source.level and grails.project.target.level to 1.7?
    – Keegan
    Jul 15, 2014 at 18:45
  • Oh, and also are you using Grails directly? Or are you integrating Grails with some other build tool (Gradle, Maven, etc)? If so, you may need to set the desired bytecode in both your build tool and Grails itself.
    – Keegan
    Jul 15, 2014 at 18:58
  • @Keegan - thanks for the suggestions. But yes, both items are set, and yes, running grails directly.
    – CharlesW
    Jul 16, 2014 at 11:49

3 Answers 3

6

The default Groovy behaviour is not to compile the code with the same bytecode version as the JDK being used. 1.5 is the default for compatibility reasons, IMHO. If you want the compiler to output newer bytecode you need to set that explicitly.

For example if you're using Maven to compile the code, you can use the GMavenPlus plugin. See the description of the targetBytecode parameter.

If you're not using Maven you can use -Dgroovy.target.bytecode=1.7 or research the possibilities for your particular build tool

11
  • "1.5 is the default for compatibility reasons" where did u get this information ? Jul 15, 2014 at 15:20
  • Any suggestions how to do this with Grails? I put groovy.target.bytecode=1.7 in BuildConfig.groovy, but I don't believe it looked at it, since it didn't object to a silly value either.
    – CharlesW
    Jul 15, 2014 at 15:35
  • That's not exactly true, it depends on your environment. 1.5 is the default for GMavenPlus (following the pattern established by the Maven Compiler Plugin). Gradle defaults to whatever JDK you use to compile. Gant I assume would take the default that Groovyc sets (different, depending on Groovy version). Grails seems to have its own defaults beside those of Gant.
    – Keegan
    Jul 15, 2014 at 18:44
  • @xwid I ended the sentence with "IMHO" :) So I'm not saying it's the absolute truth. But to me that is the most reasonable explanation - no to cut off people running older Java versions unless it's absolutely necessary. When they decide they can no longer live with what 1.5 bytecode offers they'll move higher up the ladder, I think. Jul 15, 2014 at 18:47
  • To clarify things further: both the latest version of Groovy and 2.1.9 (which @CharlesW uses) take 1.5 as a default when there is no manual override. Check the Groovy sources. Jul 15, 2014 at 18:56
0

If you're using Maven as the build tool, then chances are that it's using the gmavenplus-plugin to compile Groovy. To find out the target Java version of the bytecode generated I poked into the pom of the gmavenplus-plugin that my application uses: ~/.m2/repository/org/codehaus/gmavenplus/gmavenplus-plugin/1.5/gmavenplus-plugin-1.5.pom.

Inside that file I saw this, notice <javaVersion/>,

 <properties>
    <project.build.sourceEncoding>UTF-8</project.build.sourceEncoding>
    <project.reporting.outputEncoding>UTF-8</project.reporting.outputEncoding>
    <mavenVersion>2.2.1</mavenVersion>
    <coberturaPluginVersion>2.7</coberturaPluginVersion>
    <javadocPluginVersion>2.10.1</javadocPluginVersion>
    <!-- these are properties so integration tests can use them -->
    <javaVersion>1.5</javaVersion>
    <dependencyPluginVersion>2.10</dependencyPluginVersion>
    <compilerPluginVersion>3.2</compilerPluginVersion>
    <junitVersion>4.12</junitVersion>
    <surefirePluginVersion>2.18.1</surefirePluginVersion>
    <pluginPluginVersion>3.4</pluginPluginVersion>
    <!-- this is a property so that site generation can use it -->
    <sourcePluginVersion>2.4</sourcePluginVersion>
    <!-- this is a property so that site generation and integration tests can use it -->
    <groovyVersion>2.4.1</groovyVersion>
  </properties>
...
<plugin>
        <groupId>org.apache.maven.plugins</groupId>
        <artifactId>maven-compiler-plugin</artifactId>
        <version>${compilerPluginVersion}</version>
        <configuration>
          <source>${javaVersion}</source>
          <target>${javaVersion}</target>
        </configuration>
      </plugin>

I use IntelliJ for an IDE. IntelliJ is automatically setting the language level to Java 1.5. Even if I change it, when I re-import projects it resets back to Java 1.5 (I've fuzzed out sensitive information),

enter image description here

-1

I think the issue is with the program you are using to find the class version. If the assertion is not enabled the stream doesnt read the first two unsigned shorts and hence the subsequent minor and major read statements results in 0Xcafe and 0xbabe respectively. Try enabling assertion or try using an if check.

public static String getVersion() throws Exception {
    String classAsPath = "com/my/organisation/CompilerVersionSupport.class";
    InputStream stream = (new CompilerVersionSupport()).getClass().getClassLoader().getResourceAsStream(classAsPath);
    DataInputStream ins = new DataInputStream(stream);

    if(ins.readUnsignedShort() != 0xcafe) throw new AssertionError("Invalid Class");
    if(ins.readUnsignedShort() != 0xbabe) throw new AssertionError("Invalid Class");
    int minor = ins.readUnsignedShort();
    int major = ins.readUnsignedShort();
    ins.close();
    int javaVersion = major - 44;
    return "1." + javaVersion;
}
1
  • Thanks for the response, but if that was true I think I'd get 0xbabe as the value, not 49.
    – CharlesW
    Jul 16, 2014 at 12:05

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