69

I have a dataframe containing a single column of IDs and all other columns are numerical values for which I want to compute z-scores. Here's a subsection of it:

ID      Age    BMI    Risk Factor
PT 6    48     19.3    4
PT 8    43     20.9    NaN
PT 2    39     18.1    3
PT 9    41     19.5    NaN

Some of my columns contain NaN values which I do not want to include into the z-score calculations so I intend to use a solution offered to this question: how to zscore normalize pandas column with nans?

df['zscore'] = (df.a - df.a.mean())/df.a.std(ddof=0)

I'm interested in applying this solution to all of my columns except the ID column to produce a new dataframe which I can save as an Excel file using

df2.to_excel("Z-Scores.xlsx")

So basically; how can I compute z-scores for each column (ignoring NaN values) and push everything into a new dataframe?

SIDENOTE: there is a concept in pandas called "indexing" which intimidates me because I do not understand it well. If indexing is a crucial part of solving this problem, please dumb down your explanation of indexing.

5
  • What don't you understand about indexing?
    – EdChum
    Jul 15, 2014 at 15:43
  • I think its something like the concept of a primary key in SQL databases where you set an identifier that will let you refer to values within a row; but I'm not even sure about that. I don't really understand when I would want to set an index either.
    – Slavatron
    Jul 15, 2014 at 15:47
  • The concept of the index is no different to an SQL table but unlike a clustered index say, a multi-index will have different levels, think grouping by say gender, then age, then weight for example. The other concept is label indexing, your index can be anything, strings, dates, integers etc.. You can index using label indexing or by integer value: pandas.pydata.org/pandas-docs/stable/…
    – EdChum
    Jul 15, 2014 at 15:51
  • Interesting; that sounds like it could be really useful once I get the hang of it. I'm still intimidated by all the unfamiliar jargon in the documentation but it definitely feels a little more accessible now. Thanks again.
    – Slavatron
    Jul 15, 2014 at 16:13
  • (Probably much too late to help you.) One big advantage of df.set_index(['ID']) is that all of the hassles you have with treating that column separately now go away.
    – Teepeemm
    Feb 14, 2020 at 21:26

8 Answers 8

92

Build a list from the columns and remove the column you don't want to calculate the Z score for:

In [66]:
cols = list(df.columns)
cols.remove('ID')
df[cols]

Out[66]:
   Age  BMI  Risk  Factor
0    6   48  19.3       4
1    8   43  20.9     NaN
2    2   39  18.1       3
3    9   41  19.5     NaN
In [68]:
# now iterate over the remaining columns and create a new zscore column
for col in cols:
    col_zscore = col + '_zscore'
    df[col_zscore] = (df[col] - df[col].mean())/df[col].std(ddof=0)
df
Out[68]:
   ID  Age  BMI  Risk  Factor  Age_zscore  BMI_zscore  Risk_zscore  \
0  PT    6   48  19.3       4   -0.093250    1.569614    -0.150946   
1  PT    8   43  20.9     NaN    0.652753    0.074744     1.459148   
2  PT    2   39  18.1       3   -1.585258   -1.121153    -1.358517   
3  PT    9   41  19.5     NaN    1.025755   -0.523205     0.050315   

   Factor_zscore  
0              1  
1            NaN  
2             -1  
3            NaN  
10
  • 2
    is there a way to do this without the for loop? (assime you don't need to remove one of the columns...) Jul 24, 2017 at 13:55
  • 2
    @AlexLenail looking at this again 3 years later you could just define a func and call this func using apply as this is syntactic sugar for a for loop
    – EdChum
    Jul 24, 2017 at 18:08
  • 3
    @RyszardCetnarski see an explanation statsdirect.com/help/basics/degrees_freedom.htm and stats.stackexchange.com/questions/58230/… it depends on your use case
    – EdChum
    Mar 20, 2018 at 13:15
  • 1
    Unless I'm missing something, @Manuel 's answer (using scipy's zscore function) below should be better: no looping, using existing functions, and way more concise. Why reinvent the wheel and add more lines to your code, when one will do?
    – Khashir
    Jul 28, 2019 at 18:23
  • 1
    @EdChum: That makes a lot of sense—I don't think it's a bad answer; rather, the purpose of SE is to have the best answer possible at the top. So, my comment is to guide people to the more updated approach, even if the OP has not come back to update his choice. Alternatively, I've seen respondents incorporate later answers into theirs, giving credit to the person who added that response (again, thinking about the SE's philosophy). So, you could add the scipy element (without deleting yours) and credit Manuel.
    – Khashir
    Jul 28, 2019 at 19:03
91

Using Scipy's zscore function:

df = pd.DataFrame(np.random.randint(100, 200, size=(5, 3)), columns=['A', 'B', 'C'])
df

|    |   A |   B |   C |
|---:|----:|----:|----:|
|  0 | 163 | 163 | 159 |
|  1 | 120 | 153 | 181 |
|  2 | 130 | 199 | 108 |
|  3 | 108 | 188 | 157 |
|  4 | 109 | 171 | 119 |

from scipy.stats import zscore
df.apply(zscore)

|    |         A |         B |         C |
|---:|----------:|----------:|----------:|
|  0 |  1.83447  | -0.708023 |  0.523362 |
|  1 | -0.297482 | -1.30804  |  1.3342   |
|  2 |  0.198321 |  1.45205  | -1.35632  |
|  3 | -0.892446 |  0.792025 |  0.449649 |
|  4 | -0.842866 | -0.228007 | -0.950897 |

If not all the columns of your data frame are numeric, then you can apply the Z-score function only to the numeric columns using the select_dtypes function:

# Note that `select_dtypes` returns a data frame. We are selecting only the columns
numeric_cols = df.select_dtypes(include=[np.number]).columns
df[numeric_cols].apply(zscore)

|    |         A |         B |         C |
|---:|----------:|----------:|----------:|
|  0 |  1.83447  | -0.708023 |  0.523362 |
|  1 | -0.297482 | -1.30804  |  1.3342   |
|  2 |  0.198321 |  1.45205  | -1.35632  |
|  3 | -0.892446 |  0.792025 |  0.449649 |
|  4 | -0.842866 | -0.228007 | -0.950897 |
2
  • how to apply in place rather than returning a new copy?
    – CKM
    Jan 3, 2018 at 5:55
  • 1
    @chandresh, apply does not have an inplace parameter, so you cannot replace the column data with the function result.You should check this question: stackoverflow.com/questions/45570984/…
    – Manuel
    Jan 4, 2018 at 10:37
27

If you want to calculate the zscore for all of the columns, you can just use the following:

df_zscore = (df - df.mean())/df.std()
4
  • 2
    Oddly, for me anyway, this calculation of score gives slightly different results than "from scipy.stats import zscore; df.apply(zscore)". Anyone know why?
    – pitosalas
    Apr 28, 2018 at 22:14
  • 2
    @pitosalas: Could be different default ddof for the std function
    – ascripter
    Jun 21, 2018 at 13:10
  • 5
    @pitosalas: @ascripter, you are correct. Passing df.std(ddof=0) produces the same result as df.apply(scipy.stats.zscore)
    – roob
    Sep 26, 2018 at 21:24
  • pandas probably won't be happy about the non-numerical ID column, but it should be an index anyway. I like that this one operates on the entire dataframe, instead of column by column like the other answers.
    – Teepeemm
    Feb 14, 2020 at 21:32
7

Here's other way of getting Zscore using custom function:

In [6]: import pandas as pd; import numpy as np

In [7]: np.random.seed(0) # Fixes the random seed

In [8]: df = pd.DataFrame(np.random.randn(5,3), columns=["randomA", "randomB","randomC"])

In [9]: df # watch output of dataframe
Out[9]:
    randomA   randomB   randomC
0  1.764052  0.400157  0.978738
1  2.240893  1.867558 -0.977278
2  0.950088 -0.151357 -0.103219
3  0.410599  0.144044  1.454274
4  0.761038  0.121675  0.443863

## Create custom function to compute Zscore 
In [10]: def z_score(df):
   ....:         df.columns = [x + "_zscore" for x in df.columns.tolist()]
   ....:         return ((df - df.mean())/df.std(ddof=0))
   ....:

## make sure you filter or select columns of interest before passing dataframe to function
In [11]: z_score(df) # compute Zscore
Out[11]:
   randomA_zscore  randomB_zscore  randomC_zscore
0        0.798350       -0.106335        0.731041
1        1.505002        1.939828       -1.577295
2       -0.407899       -0.875374       -0.545799
3       -1.207392       -0.463464        1.292230
4       -0.688061       -0.494655        0.099824

Result reproduced using scipy.stats zscore

In [12]: from scipy.stats import zscore

In [13]: df.apply(zscore) # (Credit: Manuel)
Out[13]:
    randomA   randomB   randomC
0  0.798350 -0.106335  0.731041
1  1.505002  1.939828 -1.577295
2 -0.407899 -0.875374 -0.545799
3 -1.207392 -0.463464  1.292230
4 -0.688061 -0.494655  0.099824
7

for Z score, we can stick to documentation instead of using 'apply' function

from scipy.stats import zscore
df_zscore = zscore(cols as array, axis=1)
2
  • Which package would the zscore be in ?
    – whisperer
    Feb 20, 2019 at 1:33
  • I just fixed it. It is scipy library
    – ibozkurt79
    Feb 21, 2019 at 5:49
4

The almost one-liner solution:

df2 = (df.ix[:,1:] - df.ix[:,1:].mean()) / df.ix[:,1:].std()
df2['ID'] = df['ID']
2
  • 9
    almost one-liner aka two-liner :)
    – Wtower
    Dec 26, 2016 at 22:30
  • 2
    One liner df2 = df2.assign(ID=(df.ix[:,1:] - df.ix[:,1:].mean()) / df.ix[:,1:].std()) Nov 6, 2017 at 9:18
1

When we are dealing with time-series, calculating z-scores (or anomalies - not the same thing, but you can adapt this code easily) is a bit more complicated. For example, you have 10 years of temperature data measured weekly. To calculate z-scores for the whole time-series, you have to know the means and standard deviations for each day of the year. So, let's get started:

Assume you have a pandas DataFrame. First of all, you need a DateTime index. If you don't have it yet, but luckily you do have a column with dates, just make it as your index. Pandas will try to guess the date format. The goal here is to have DateTimeIndex. You can check it out by trying:

type(df.index)

If you don't have one, let's make it.

df.index = pd.DatetimeIndex(df[datecolumn])
df = df.drop(datecolumn,axis=1)

Next step is to calculate mean and standard deviation for each group of days. For this, we use the groupby method.

mean = pd.groupby(df,by=[df.index.dayofyear]).aggregate(np.nanmean)
std = pd.groupby(df,by=[df.index.dayofyear]).aggregate(np.nanstd)

Finally, we loop through all the dates, performing the calculation (value - mean)/stddev; however, as mentioned, for time-series this is not so straightforward.

df2 = df.copy() #keep a copy for future comparisons 
for y in np.unique(df.index.year):
    for d in np.unique(df.index.dayofyear):
        df2[(df.index.year==y) & (df.index.dayofyear==d)] = (df[(df.index.year==y) & (df.index.dayofyear==d)]- mean.ix[d])/std.ix[d]
        df2.index.name = 'date' #this is just to look nicer

df2 #this is your z-score dataset.

The logic inside the for loops is: for a given year we have to match each dayofyear to its mean and stdev. We run this for all the years in your time-series.

0

To calculate a z-score for an entire column quickly, do as follows:

from scipy.stats import zscore
import pandas as pd

df = pd.DataFrame({'num_1': [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,3,4,6,5,7,3,2,9]})
df['num_1_zscore'] = zscore(df['num_1'])

display(df)

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