2

I have the following CSV file:

more my_file.csv
Alabama,Alaska,Arizona,Arkansas,California,Colorado,Connecticut,Delaware,Florida,Georgia,Hawaii,Idaho,Illinois,Indiana,Iowa
1000,"1 0 0 1",1002,1002,1003,1004,1005,"1 0 0 6",1007,1008,1009,1010,1011,1012,1013
100," 1 0 1 ",102,102,103,104,105,"1 0 6 2",107,108,109,"1 1 0 3 5 62 0",111,112,113
10001,10011,10021,10021,10031,10041,10051,10061,10071,10081,10091,10101,10111,10121,10131
.
.
.
.

My target is to set the CSV parameters ( all states in CSV ) with their values in my bash script

for example ( regarding the second line values )

in my bash script I will able to read each parameter

example

 echo $Alabama
 1000 
 echo $Alaska
 1 0 0 1

First I just tried to write the following (wrong) code, in order to set the parameters with their values:

#!/bin/bash

counter=1

for CSV_COLUMN in Alabama  Alaska  Arizona Arkansas  California  Colorado  Connecticut Delaware Florida  Georgia  Hawaii  Idaho  Illinois  Indiana  Iowa 
do
  export $CSV_COLUMN=` echo $CSV_LINE | cut -d',' -f$counter `
  counter=$counter+1
done

The test should be (from the bash script)

echo $Alabama
1000

How should I change my code in order to implement my idea?

  • 1
    CSV is a tabular format. Why echo $Alabama should only display the field value for the first row? – Sylvain Leroux Jul 15 '14 at 15:32
  • IN MY CASE --> each parameter ( the first line in CSV ) have one value ( value also can be betweeb "................" ) – maihabunash Jul 15 '14 at 15:34
  • Why do you want to create individual shell variables using each column value from csv file. Wouldn't awk be better suited to process a csv file. – anubhava Jul 15 '14 at 15:44
  • I am with opened mind , if awk can do the Job better please show us? , awk should be in the bash scipt ( as awk one liner line ) – maihabunash Jul 15 '14 at 15:45
6

Basic building block to solve your problem:

#!/bin/bash

while IFS="," read Alabama  Alaska  Arizona Arkansas  California  Colorado  Connecticut Delaware Florida  Georgia  Hawaii  Idaho  Illinois  Indiana  Iowa 
do
    echo $Alabama
done < my_file.csv

Given your input file, this produces:

sh$ ./m.sh 
Alabama
1000
100
10001

EDIT If you are only interested in the n-th line (stored in CSV_LINE), you could sed -n ...p your input file (and use if instead of while):

#!/bin/bash

# ...
# Set your CSV_LINE to the (file) line number you are looking for (here, line 2)
CSV_LINE=2
# ...

sed -n "${CSV_LINE}p" | if IFS="," read Alabama  Alaska  Arizona Arkansas  California  Colorado  Connecticut Delaware Florida  Georgia  Hawaii  Idaho  Illinois  Indiana  Iowa 
then
    echo $Alabama
fi < my_file.csv

Please note: since pipes are executed in a sub shell, the various variables are only bound inside the body of the if statement.


If you don't like the if construct, I've just learned than using process substitution you might write:

#!/bin/bash

# ...
# Set your CSV_LINE to the (file) line number you are looking for (here, line 2)
CSV_LINE=2
# ...

IFS="," read Alabama  Alaska  Arizona Arkansas  California  Colorado  Connecticut Delaware Florida  Georgia  Hawaii  Idaho  Illinois  Indiana  Iowa \
       < <(sed -n "${CSV_LINE}p" < my_file.csv)

echo $Alabama

Without a pipe there is not sub-shell -- so the variable are accessible from anywhere in the script after issuing the read internal command.

  • is it possible to do that: done << $CSV_LINE ? in your code in place to to do < my_file.csv – maihabunash Jul 15 '14 at 15:43
  • @maihabunash It is not quite clear to me what $CSV_LINE is. But anyway, you could redirect from inside the script of course. Assuming it holds the name of your CSV file, something like that ... done < "$CSV_LINE". As I said, those are only basic building blocks. You should probably be able to progress by yourself now. Feel free to ask an other question is you stumble on an other problem! – Sylvain Leroux Jul 15 '14 at 15:48
  • CSV_LINE is one line from the CSV file ( could be the second line or the threed line etc ) – maihabunash Jul 15 '14 at 15:50
  • @maihabunash Modified accordingly. – Sylvain Leroux Jul 15 '14 at 16:04
  • is it possible redirect $LINE from the CSV ? as: done < " 1002 222 222 333 223 435 45 46 4656" – maihabunash Jul 15 '14 at 16:07
0

Bash can handle CSV files like yours (there are some restrictions, more on that below) with a pattern like the following (assuming you run the script with the CSV file as standard input), which uses the field names in the first line as variable names automatically:

# Get the field names from the first line
IFS=, read fields

# Define command to read all fields from a line
fieldsreader="IFS=, read ${fields//,/ }"

# Look over all records
while eval $fieldsreader; do
    ## This is run once per data line
    ## with access to $fieldname for all fields.
done

Your example could thus be encoded as

IFS=, read fields
fieldsreader="IFS=, read ${fields//,/ }"
while eval $fieldsreader; do
    echo $Alabama
done

which will print

1000
100
10001
...

Notice, however, that using bash's read command with IFS=, in this way does not parse CSV files properly: bash only recognizes \-quoting but not the "-quoting that is usual in CSV files (as mandated, for example, by RFC4180).

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