390

Yes, I know there's AlertDialog.Builder, but I'm shocked to know how difficult (well, at least not programmer-friendly) to display a dialog in Android.

I used to be a .NET developer, and I'm wondering is there any Android-equivalent of the following?

if (MessageBox.Show("Sure?", "", MessageBoxButtons.YesNo) == DialogResult.Yes){
    // Do something...
}
3
  • 3
    How do i resue AlertDialog code and handle events(yes, no actions) in all the screens? In .Net we use the Action class to handle the events, is there any way to implement this? I know using interfaces we can do this but any alternate way? Apr 21, 2015 at 6:31
  • 2
    Yes.... we .NET developers really do have a hard time with android....I wonder if Xamarin is a great tool? Jul 14, 2017 at 2:43

17 Answers 17

796

AlertDialog.Builder really isn't that hard to use. It's a bit intimidating at first for sure, but once you've used it a bit it's both simple and powerful. I know you've said you know how to use it, but here's just a simple example anyway:

DialogInterface.OnClickListener dialogClickListener = new DialogInterface.OnClickListener() {
    @Override
    public void onClick(DialogInterface dialog, int which) {
        switch (which){
        case DialogInterface.BUTTON_POSITIVE:
            //Yes button clicked
            break;

        case DialogInterface.BUTTON_NEGATIVE:
            //No button clicked
            break;
        }
    }
};

AlertDialog.Builder builder = new AlertDialog.Builder(context);
builder.setMessage("Are you sure?").setPositiveButton("Yes", dialogClickListener)
    .setNegativeButton("No", dialogClickListener).show();

You can also reuse that DialogInterface.OnClickListener if you have other yes/no boxes that should do the same thing.

If you're creating the Dialog from within a View.OnClickListener, you can use view.getContext() to get the Context. Alternatively you can use yourFragmentName.getActivity().

15
  • 3
    new AlertDialog.Builder(this); Compile time error: 'The constructor AlertDialog.Builder(new View.OnClickListener(){}) is undefined' Apr 4, 2012 at 23:54
  • 3
    Simple and useful, btw, dialog will dismiss itself after user click "YES" or "NO" button. There is nothing you need to do.
    – RRTW
    Mar 8, 2013 at 7:31
  • 11
    Me myself, I have used it lots of times. But I have found it is actually easier and faster to look it up on SO. The code sample given here is so simple...I really wish Android documentation would look like this.
    – Radu
    Mar 21, 2013 at 13:47
  • 4
    @EricLeschinski probably "this" isn't a context, try this one: AlertDialog.Builder builder = new AlertDialog.Builder(getView().getContext());
    – cldrr
    May 16, 2013 at 7:43
  • 1
    @davidglorioso The order of yes/no or no/yes depends on the version of Android, and you can't control it. I don't remember when it changed, but I think it was in 4.x or 5. Saying that, you shouldn't change it anyway. All apps which use standard alert dialogs will use the same no/yes button order, and it would be confusing for users if yours were different. If you really want it to be different, you'll have to manually set your positive/negative buttons dependent on the Android version. Jun 1, 2016 at 13:57
186

Try this:

AlertDialog.Builder builder = new AlertDialog.Builder(this);

builder.setTitle("Confirm");
builder.setMessage("Are you sure?");

builder.setPositiveButton("YES", new DialogInterface.OnClickListener() {

    public void onClick(DialogInterface dialog, int which) {
        // Do nothing but close the dialog

        dialog.dismiss();
    }
});

builder.setNegativeButton("NO", new DialogInterface.OnClickListener() {

    @Override
    public void onClick(DialogInterface dialog, int which) {

        // Do nothing
        dialog.dismiss();
    }
});

AlertDialog alert = builder.create();
alert.show();
6
  • 30
    Personally, I like that code snippet more than the accepted answer
    – John
    Dec 30, 2013 at 10:22
  • 2
    @nikki why do both have dismiss() ?
    – likejudo
    Mar 15, 2014 at 19:00
  • The constructor AlertDialog.Builder(MainActivity.DrawerItemClickListener) is undefined
    – hash
    Dec 24, 2014 at 6:49
  • 1
    @likejiujitsu thats becuse you want to clean the dialog from memory in any case after you do your work.
    – Avi Levin
    May 9, 2015 at 8:07
  • @nikki how can I get a custom argument in onClick? Dec 5, 2020 at 7:29
35

Steve H's answer is spot on, but here's a bit more information: the reason that dialogs work the way they do is because dialogs in Android are asynchronous (execution does not stop when the dialog is displayed). Because of this, you have to use a callback to handle the user's selection.

Check out this question for a longer discussion between the differences in Android and .NET (as it relates to dialogs): Dialogs / AlertDialogs: How to "block execution" while dialog is up (.NET-style)

3
  • 8
    Thanks, the fact that Android dialogs are asynchronous makes everything clear (and reasonable) now. Seems I need to "think out of .Net" when developing apps for Android :)
    – Solo
    Mar 21, 2010 at 6:58
  • 1
    FYI: what you call "asynchronous dialog" is called "modeless dialog" in the GUI terminology, whereas "synchronous dialog" is called "modal dialog". Android does not feature modal dialogs (except in very exceptional cases).
    – Alex
    Dec 22, 2012 at 20:18
  • Android doesn't allow system modal dialogs for a very good reason: is not allowed interfere with another apps on device. Dec 26, 2014 at 11:42
14

This is working for me:

AlertDialog.Builder builder = new AlertDialog.Builder(getApplicationContext());

    builder.setTitle("Confirm");
    builder.setMessage("Are you sure?");

    builder.setPositiveButton("YES", new DialogInterface.OnClickListener() {

        public void onClick(DialogInterface dialog, int which) {

            // Do nothing, but close the dialog
            dialog.dismiss();
        }
    });

    builder.setNegativeButton("NO", new DialogInterface.OnClickListener() {

        @Override
        public void onClick(DialogInterface dialog, int which) {

            // Do nothing
            dialog.dismiss();
        }
    });

    AlertDialog alert = builder.create();
    alert.show();
10

Asking a Person whether he wants to call or not Dialog..

import android.app.Activity;
import android.app.AlertDialog;
import android.content.DialogInterface;
import android.content.Intent;
import android.net.Uri;
import android.os.Bundle;
import android.view.View;
import android.view.View.OnClickListener;
import android.widget.ImageView;
import android.widget.Toast;

public class Firstclass extends Activity {

    @Override
    protected void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {    
        super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);    
        setContentView(R.layout.first);

        ImageView imageViewCall = (ImageView) findViewById(R.id.ring_mig);

        imageViewCall.setOnClickListener(new OnClickListener() {
            @Override
            public void onClick(View v){
                try{
                    showDialog("0728570527");
                } catch (Exception e){
                    e.printStackTrace();
                }                   
            }    
        });    
    }

    public void showDialog(final String phone) throws Exception {
        AlertDialog.Builder builder = new AlertDialog.Builder(Firstclass.this);

        builder.setMessage("Ring: " + phone);       

        builder.setPositiveButton("Ring", new DialogInterface.OnClickListener(){
            @Override
            public void onClick(DialogInterface dialog, int which){

                Intent callIntent = new Intent(Intent.ACTION_DIAL);// (Intent.ACTION_CALL);                 
                callIntent.setData(Uri.parse("tel:" + phone));
                startActivity(callIntent);

                dialog.dismiss();
            }
        });

        builder.setNegativeButton("Abort", new DialogInterface.OnClickListener(){   
            @Override
            public void onClick(DialogInterface dialog, int which){
                dialog.dismiss();
            }
        });         
        builder.show();
    }    
}
0
8

Kotlin implementation.

You can create a simple function like this:

fun dialogYesOrNo(
        activity: Activity,
        title: String,
        message: String,
        listener: DialogInterface.OnClickListener
    ) {
        val builder = AlertDialog.Builder(activity)
        builder.setPositiveButton("Yes", DialogInterface.OnClickListener { dialog, id ->
            dialog.dismiss()
            listener.onClick(dialog, id)
        })
        builder.setNegativeButton("No", null)
        val alert = builder.create()
        alert.setTitle(title)
        alert.setMessage(message)
        alert.show()
    }

and call it like this:

dialogYesOrNo(
  this,
  "Question",
  "Would you like to eat?",
  DialogInterface.OnClickListener { dialog, id ->
    // do whatever you need to do when user presses "Yes"
  }
})
1
  • Everything is fine until user leave the app with the pop up still open, if system kill the app in background, will get a WindowLeaked exception Oct 28, 2021 at 1:11
7

Show dialog anonymously as chain of commands & without defining another object:

 new AlertDialog.Builder(this).setTitle("Confirm Delete?")
                        .setMessage("Are you sure?")
                        .setPositiveButton("YES",
                                new DialogInterface.OnClickListener() {
                                    public void onClick(DialogInterface dialog, int which) {

                                       // Perform Action & Dismiss dialog                                 
                                        dialog.dismiss();
                                    }
                                })
                        .setNegativeButton("NO", new DialogInterface.OnClickListener() {
                            @Override
                            public void onClick(DialogInterface dialog, int which) {
                                // Do nothing
                                dialog.dismiss();
                            }
                        })
                        .create()
                        .show();
6

All the answers here boil down to lengthy and not reader-friendly code: just what the person asking was trying to avoid. To me, was the easiest approach is to employ lambdas here:

new AlertDialog.Builder(this)
        .setTitle("Are you sure?")
        .setMessage("If you go back you will loose any changes.")
        .setPositiveButton("Yes", (dialog, which) -> {
            doSomething();
            dialog.dismiss();
        })
        .setNegativeButton("No", (dialog, which) -> dialog.dismiss())
        .show();

Lambdas in Android require the retrolambda plugin (https://github.com/evant/gradle-retrolambda), but it's hugely helpful in writing cleaner code anyways.

1
  • It worked great, but why don't we need to define the data types for "dialog" and "which"?
    – rmutalik
    Dec 4, 2022 at 18:01
6

In Kotlin:

AlertDialog.Builder(this)
    .setTitle(R.string.question_title)
    .setMessage(R.string.question_message)
    .setPositiveButton(android.R.string.yes) { _, _ -> yesClicked() }
    .setNegativeButton(android.R.string.no) { _, _ -> noClicked() }
    .show()
1
  • 'android.R.string.yes: Int' is deprecated. Deprecated in Java
    – Lechucico
    Jan 27, 2023 at 14:27
5

Steves answer is correct though outdated with fragments. Here is an example with FragmentDialog.

The class:

public class SomeDialog extends DialogFragment {

    @Override
    public Dialog onCreateDialog(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
        return new AlertDialog.Builder(getActivity())
            .setTitle("Title")
            .setMessage("Sure you wanna do this!")
            .setNegativeButton(android.R.string.no, new OnClickListener() {
                @Override
                public void onClick(DialogInterface dialog, int which) {
                    // do nothing (will close dialog)
                }
            })
            .setPositiveButton(android.R.string.yes,  new OnClickListener() {
                @Override
                public void onClick(DialogInterface dialog, int which) {
                    // do something
                }
            })
            .create();
    }
}

To start dialog:

            FragmentTransaction ft = getSupportFragmentManager().beginTransaction();
            // Create and show the dialog.
            SomeDialog newFragment = new SomeDialog ();
            newFragment.show(ft, "dialog");

You could also let the class implement onClickListener and use that instead of embedded listeners.

13
  • @likejiujitsu above is sufficient.
    – Warpzit
    Mar 16, 2014 at 6:03
  • Create a FragmentDialog class just to do a no/yes box is a bit of overdesign... :) A default AlertDialog is fair enough, yet. Dec 26, 2014 at 11:46
  • @Renascienza yes but I believe it is obsolete.
    – Warpzit
    Dec 26, 2014 at 12:37
  • 2
    My recommendation is: if you need reuse not just a layout, but background and lifecycle code, use a Fragment dialog. With the fragment you have the related activity lifecycle control and can react to events like create (as the UI is re-created when user rotate his device), pause, resume, etc. On a nutshell, a dialog with some elaborated UI. If you don't need this and your dialog is pretty simple, regular dialogs works fine. Dec 26, 2014 at 17:20
  • 1
    @TJJ Basically you just make a method somewhere and call said method from within the onClick listener. I'd recommend taking some basic coding classes etc. This is very basic.
    – Warpzit
    Jun 1, 2021 at 10:01
5

Thanks nikki your answer has helped me improve an existing simply by adding my desired action as follows

AlertDialog.Builder builder = new AlertDialog.Builder(this);

builder.setTitle("Do this action");
builder.setMessage("do you want confirm this action?");

builder.setPositiveButton("YES", new DialogInterface.OnClickListener() {

    public void onClick(DialogInterface dialog, int which) {
        // Do do my action here

        dialog.dismiss();
    }

});

builder.setNegativeButton("NO", new DialogInterface.OnClickListener() {

    @Override
    public void onClick(DialogInterface dialog, int which) {
        // I do not need any action here you might
        dialog.dismiss();
    }
});

AlertDialog alert = builder.create();
alert.show();
3
  • I got the impression that the OP didn't want to use AlertDialog.Builder. OP wats to know if there is a shortcut utility method,
    – walrii
    Nov 11, 2012 at 6:03
  • 1
    I have written the same code but NO appears first and then YES basically it is a NO / YES dialog box but I need a YES / NO dialog box How do i do it Aug 19, 2014 at 19:19
  • As for the YES/NO vs NO/YES see this answer: stackoverflow.com/a/13644589/1815624 you can manipulate it as discribed in this answer: stackoverflow.com/a/13644536/1815624
    – CrandellWS
    Aug 23, 2014 at 16:51
2

1.Create AlertDialog set message,title and Positive,Negative Button:

final AlertDialog alertDialog = new AlertDialog.Builder(this)
                        .setCancelable(false)
                        .setTitle("Confirmation")
                        .setMessage("Do you want to remove this Picture?")
                        .setPositiveButton("Yes",null)
                        .setNegativeButton("No",null)
                        .create();

2.Now find both buttons on DialogInterface Click then setOnClickListener():

alertDialog.setOnShowListener(new DialogInterface.OnShowListener() {
            @Override
            public void onShow(DialogInterface dialogInterface) {
                Button yesButton = (alertDialog).getButton(android.app.AlertDialog.BUTTON_POSITIVE);
                Button noButton = (alertDialog).getButton(android.app.AlertDialog.BUTTON_NEGATIVE);
                yesButton.setOnClickListener(new View.OnClickListener() {
                    @Override
                    public void onClick(View view) {
                        //Now Background Class To Update Operator State
                        alertDialog.dismiss();
                        Toast.makeText(GroundEditActivity.this, "Click on Yes", Toast.LENGTH_SHORT).show();
                        //Do Something here 
                    }
                });

                noButton.setOnClickListener(new View.OnClickListener() {
                    @Override
                    public void onClick(View view) {
                        alertDialog.dismiss();
                        Toast.makeText(GroundEditActivity.this, "Click on No", Toast.LENGTH_SHORT).show();
                        //Do Some Thing Here 
                    }
                });
            }
        });

3.To Show Alertdialog:

alertDialog.show();

Note: Don't forget Final Keyword with AlertDialog.

0
1

Thanks. I use the API Level 2 (Android 1.1) and instead of BUTTON_POSITIVE and BUTTON_NEGATIVE i have to use BUTTON1 and BUTTON2.

1

For Kotlin in Android::

    override fun onBackPressed() {
        confirmToCancel()
    }

    private fun confirmToCancel() {
        AlertDialog.Builder(this)
            .setTitle("Title")
            .setMessage("Do you want to cancel?")
            .setCancelable(false)
            .setPositiveButton("Yes") {
                dialog: DialogInterface, _: Int ->
                dialog.dismiss()
                // for sending data to previous activity use
                // setResult(response code, data)
                finish()
            }
            .setNegativeButton("No") {
                dialog: DialogInterface, _: Int ->
                dialog.dismiss()
            }
            .show()
    } 
0
AlertDialog.Builder altBx = new AlertDialog.Builder(this);
    altBx.setTitle("My dialog box");
    altBx.setMessage("Welcome, Please Enter your name");
    altBx.setIcon(R.drawable.logo);

    altBx.setPositiveButton("Ok", new DialogInterface.OnClickListener()
    {
      public void onClick(DialogInterface dialog, int which)
      {
          if(edt.getText().toString().length()!=0)
          {
              // Show any message
          }
          else 
          {

          }
      }
    });
    altBx.setNeutralButton("Cancel", new DialogInterface.OnClickListener()
    {
      public void onClick(DialogInterface dialog, int which)
      {
          //show any message
      }

    });
  altBx.show();  
0

you can implement a generic solution for decisions and use in another case not just for yes/no and custom the alert with animations or layout:

Something like this; first create your class for transfer datas:

public class AlertDecision {

    private String question = "";
    private String strNegative = "";
    private String strPositive = "";

    public AlertDecision question(@NonNull String question) {
        this.question = question;
        return this;
    }

    public AlertDecision ansPositive(@NonNull String strPositive) {
        this.strPositive = strPositive;
        return this;
    }

    public AlertDecision ansNegative(@NonNull String strNegative) {
        this.strNegative = strNegative;
        return this;
    }

    public String getQuestion() {
        return question;
    }

    public String getAnswerNegative() {
        return strNegative;
    }

    public String getAnswerPositive() {
        return strPositive;
    }
}

after a interface for return the result

public interface OnAlertDecisionClickListener {

    /**
     * Interface definition for a callback to be invoked when a view is clicked.
     *
     * @param dialog the dialog that was clicked
     * @param object The object in the position of the view
     */
    void onPositiveDecisionClick(DialogInterface dialog, Object object);
    void onNegativeDecisionClick(DialogInterface dialog, Object object);
}

Now you can create an utils for access easily (in this class you can implement different animation or custom layout for the alert):

public class AlertViewUtils {

    public static void showAlertDecision(Context context,
                                         @NonNull AlertDecision decision,
                                         final OnAlertDecisionClickListener listener,
                                         final Object object) {

        AlertDialog.Builder builder = new AlertDialog.Builder(context);
        builder.setMessage(decision.getQuestion());
        builder.setPositiveButton(decision.getAnswerPositive(),
                new DialogInterface.OnClickListener() {
                    public void onClick(DialogInterface dialog, int which) {
                        listener.onPositiveDecisionClick(dialog, object);
                    }
                });

        builder.setNegativeButton(decision.getAnswerNegative(),
                new DialogInterface.OnClickListener() {
                    public void onClick(DialogInterface dialog, int which) {
                        listener.onNegativeDecisionClick(dialog, object);
                    }
                });

        android.support.v7.app.AlertDialog dialog = builder.create();
        dialog.show();
    }
}

and the last call in activity or fragment; you can use this in you case or for other task:

public class MainActivity extends AppCompatActivity {

@Override
    protected void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
        super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);
        setContentView(R.layout.activity);
        initResources();
    }

    public void initResources() {
        Button doSomething = (Button) findViewById(R.id.btn);
        doSomething.setOnClickListener(getDecisionListener());
    }

    private View.OnClickListener getDecisionListener() {
        return new View.OnClickListener() {
            @Override
            public void onClick(View v) {
                AlertDecision decision = new AlertDecision()
                        .question("question ...")
                        .ansNegative("negative action...")
                        .ansPositive("positive action... ");
                AlertViewUtils.showAlertDecision(MainActivity.this,
                        decision, getOnDecisionListener(), v);
            }
        };
    }

    private OnAlertDecisionClickListener getOnDecisionListener() {
        return new OnAlertDecisionClickListener() {
            @Override
            public void onPositiveDecisionClick(DialogInterface dialog, Object object) {

                //do something like create, show views, etc...
            }

            @Override
            public void onNegativeDecisionClick(DialogInterface dialog, Object object) {
                //do something like delete, close session, etc ...
            }
        };
    }
} 
0

You can do it so easy in Kotlin:

 alert("Testing alerts") {
    title = "Alert"
    yesButton { toast("Yess!!!") }
    noButton { }
}.show()
0

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