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I am trying to programmatically extract some icon's from the registry. However I am noticing inconsistent behaviour. I made a basic test here:

https://gist.github.com/CoenraadS/86e80d8e7279b64b7989

class Program
{
    [DllImport("Shell32.dll", EntryPoint = "ExtractIconExW", CharSet = CharSet.Unicode, ExactSpelling = true, CallingConvention = CallingConvention.StdCall)]
    private static extern int ExtractIconEx(string sFile, int iIndex, out IntPtr piLargeVersion, out IntPtr piSmallVersion, int amountIcons);

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        IntPtr largeIconPtr = IntPtr.Zero;
        IntPtr smallIconPtr = IntPtr.Zero;

        //HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Classes\CLSID\{1206F5F1-0569-412C-8FEC-3204630DFB70}\DefaultIcon
        Console.WriteLine("Vault.dll");
        ExtractIconEx(@"%SystemRoot%\system32\Vault.dll", 1, out largeIconPtr, out smallIconPtr, 1);
        Console.WriteLine("Icon Index = 1");
        Console.WriteLine("Large: " + largeIconPtr.ToString());
        Console.WriteLine("Small: " + smallIconPtr.ToString());
        Console.WriteLine();

        Console.WriteLine("Icon Index = -1");
        ExtractIconEx(@"%SystemRoot%\system32\Vault.dll", -1, out largeIconPtr, out smallIconPtr, 1);            
        Console.WriteLine("Large: " + largeIconPtr.ToString());
        Console.WriteLine("Small: " + smallIconPtr.ToString());
        Console.WriteLine();

        //HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Classes\CLSID\{40419485-C444-4567-851A-2DD7BFA1684D}\DefaultIcon
        Console.WriteLine("telephon.cpl");
        Console.WriteLine("Icon Index = 100");
        ExtractIconEx(@"%SystemRoot%\System32\telephon.cpl", 100, out largeIconPtr, out smallIconPtr, 1);
        Console.WriteLine("Large: " + largeIconPtr.ToString());
        Console.WriteLine("Small: " + smallIconPtr.ToString());
        Console.WriteLine();

        Console.WriteLine("Icon Index = -100");
        ExtractIconEx(@"%SystemRoot%\System32\telephon.cpl", -100, out largeIconPtr, out smallIconPtr, 1);
        Console.WriteLine("Large: " + largeIconPtr.ToString());
        Console.WriteLine("Small: " + smallIconPtr.ToString());
        Console.ReadLine();
    }
}

If I read the MSDN article for how the index works:

If this value is a negative number and either phiconLarge or phiconSmall is not NULL, the function begins by extracting the icon whose resource identifier is equal to the absolute value of nIconIndex. For example, use -3 to extract the icon whose resource identifier is 3.

However I can not replicate this in my results. I can work around it by checking if the result = 0, and then flipping the value and running it again, but I feel there must be a better solution.

2
  • I tried it locally and it appears to be working except for nIconIndex = -1. Positive values correspond to zero-based icon index (0, 1, 2, 3) and negative values correspond to resource ID (these are arbitrary). However, when passing nIconIndex = -1 the function is returning the # of icons in the file, even though phiconLarge and phiconSmall are not NULL. I tried it in a pure C app in addition to C# just to be sure phiconLarge and phiconSmall weren't being marshalled as NULL pointers somehow.
    – RogerN
    Jul 16 '14 at 17:09
  • Thanks for testing, I assumed something like that was happening. However it seems all file with the -1 parameter only have 1 icon, so for now I'll just add a special case to get the default icon. Jul 16 '14 at 17:22
5

You misunderstand how the function works, you can't just flip the sign of the number.

Icons have a resource ID, a number like 100. Picked by the programmer that creates the resource file. There's no standard for picking numbers, anything is possible.

So if you know the resource ID of the icon you want then you pass a negative value, the resource ID. You'd pass, say, -100.

However, if you don't know the resource IDs that the programmer picked then you'll have to, say, pick the first icon in the resource table. You then use a positive number. 0 is the first icon, 1 is the second icon, etcetera. If you want to know how many icons are in the file, how high you can go, then pass -1 and the return value of the function tells you. How you'd get an icon with resource ID 1 is a brain teaser.

If you have the retail edition of Visual Studio then you can see these icon IDs. File + Open + File and select the EXE or DLL file. Pick c:\windows\system32\user32.dll for example, it has very recognizable icons. Open the Icons node, you'll see a list of the icons with their resource ID visible. Double-click one to see the icon itself.

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  • That's backwards according to the documentation. Negative numbers are |resource ID|s and positive numbers are indices.
    – RogerN
    Jul 16 '14 at 17:02
  • But in my test, telephon.cpl requires -100. +100 returns 0. However it's icon ID in properties = +100. Jul 16 '14 at 17:03
  • RogerN was right, corrected. Yes, -100 works, Telephon.cpl has an icon with resource ID 100. Or pass 0 to get the first (and only) one. Jul 16 '14 at 17:19
  • Although you got the order flipped (thanks RogerN), this explanation did help me understand better, I was indeed misinterpreting how it works, and -1 is an unfortunate special case that led me in the wrong direction. Jul 16 '14 at 17:34

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