4

I have a G code file for a CNC machine that needs to have two lines inserted between patterns. Essentially I need to write a simple post processor. Here is a small snippet of code from my CAM program:

G00 X-1.663 Y-0.992 Z+0.
G01 X-1.072 Y-0.992
G01 X-1.072 Y-0.874
G01 X-1.663 Y-0.874
G01 X-1.663 Y-0.992
G00 X-3.021 Y-0.992
G01 X-3.021 Y-0.874
G01 X-2.43 Y-0.874
G01 X-2.43 Y-0.992
G01 X-3.021 Y-0.992

I need to insert two lines between a G00 and G01 in that order. So the above example would now become:

G00 X-1.663 Y-0.992 Z+0.
M51
M04 F.1
G01 X-1.072 Y-0.992
G01 X-1.072 Y-0.874
G01 X-1.663 Y-0.874
G01 X-1.663 Y-0.992
G00 X-3.021 Y-0.992
M51
M04 F.1
G01 X-3.021 Y-0.874
G01 X-2.43 Y-0.874
G01 X-2.43 Y-0.992
G01 X-3.021 Y-0.992

Another thing I need is the line breaks must be Windows/DOS style with \r\n at the ends. This has to do with the old, fickle CNC controller which wants DOS text files. I could use yet another awk or sed script but a one liner would be preferred. I was trying:

awk '/G00/,/G01/{print $0 RS "M51" RS "M04 F.1";next}1' FILE

But the lines are added after ANY G00 or G01. I need ONLY between G00 and G01. One more thing, I would prefer single line commands. Thanks!

  • Why check both G00 and G01. Wouldn't awk '/G00/{$0 = $0 RS "M51" RS "M04.F1"}1' file be enough? – user000001 Jul 16 '14 at 17:48
  • Because there might be multiple G00 commands and adding duplicate commands between them would add unnecessary lines and take up precious file space. The CNC controllers file space is measured in kilobytes as its an old allen bradley 8400 made in 1987. – Mister Tea Jul 16 '14 at 17:52
  • +1 for clear question whose answers can be generalized. :) – zx81 Jul 17 '14 at 23:07
5

Using awk you can do:

awk '$1=="G00"{p=1} p && $1=="G01"{print "M51"; print "M04 F.1"; p=0} 1' file
G00 X-1.663 Y-0.992 Z+0.
M51
M04 F.1
G01 X-1.072 Y-0.992
G01 X-1.072 Y-0.874
G01 X-1.663 Y-0.874
G01 X-1.663 Y-0.992
G00 X-3.021 Y-0.992
M51
M04 F.1
G01 X-3.021 Y-0.874
G01 X-2.43 Y-0.874
G01 X-2.43 Y-0.992
G01 X-3.021 Y-0.992
  • Wow! That was fast. Works like a charm. Thank you very much. Your awk fu is strong. – Mister Tea Jul 16 '14 at 17:56
  • @zx81 Done. Thank you for the tip. – Mister Tea Jul 17 '14 at 14:39
  • What would need to be changed if there was already data between GOO and G01 and you were replacing rather than adding? – 5p0ng3b0b Apr 30 at 10:24
  • @5p0ng3b0b: Data between G00 and G01 will remain unchanged. New data will be printed just before G01 line. – anubhava Apr 30 at 14:11
  • Thanks for the fast reply. I know what you are saying. I was asking what changes to the command would be needed to replace all data between 'G00' and 'G01' instead of adding. – 5p0ng3b0b May 1 at 17:52
4

You could use something like this:

awk 'last=="G00" && $1=="G01" {print "M51\nM04 F.1"} {last=$1} 1' file

If the first field of the previous line was "G00" and the first field of the current line is "G01", then print the two lines.

Output:

G00 X-1.663 Y-0.992 Z+0.
M51
M04 F.1
G01 X-1.072 Y-0.992
G01 X-1.072 Y-0.874
G01 X-1.663 Y-0.874
G01 X-1.663 Y-0.992
G00 X-3.021 Y-0.992
M51
M04 F.1
G01 X-3.021 Y-0.874
G01 X-2.43 Y-0.874
G01 X-2.43 Y-0.992
  • Sorry if this is obvious, but what's the purpose of the 1 at the end of the awk program? – Sylvain Leroux Jul 16 '14 at 18:08
  • 1
    It evaluates to true, so awk performs the default action, which is to print the line. Longhand would be {print $0}, or just {print}. – Tom Fenech Jul 16 '14 at 18:10

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