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I have two lists holding x and y co-ordinates of points where each corresponding element represents a point.

Just an example, X_List = [1, 3, 1, 4], Y_List = [6, 7, 6, 1] then points are (1,6) (3,7) (1,6) (4,1). Thus, the most common point is (1,6).

Here's my code:

Points=[]
for x,y in zip(X_List, Y_List):
Points.append([x,y])
MostCommonPoint = max(set(Points), key=Points.count)

But, this will not work work as Points in a list which is unhashable type.

3 Answers 3

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First, zip returns a list of tuples (or an iterator of tuples in Python 3). That means you could just use zip(X_List, Y_List) instead of Points (or list(zip(X_List, Y_List)) on Python 3), and your code would work. However, it would take quadratic time.

A faster way is to use a collections.Counter, which is a dict subclass designed for counting things:

import collections

# Produce a Counter mapping each point to how many times it appears.
counts = collections.Counter(zip(X_List, Y_List))

# Find the point with the highest count.
MostCommonPoint = max(counts, key=counts.get)
3
  • 1
    You can also use counts.most_common(1) to get (a list containing) the most common point. That's a tiny bit simpler and saves another iteration through the collection. (Probably doesn't save much in this instance, but good to know in general.)
    – Weeble
    Jul 16, 2014 at 21:13
  • @Weeble: most_common(1) ends up calling max anyway. With the [0][0] to extract the list's one element and then extract the first part of the element-count tuple, I think it about breaks even on code simplicity. Jul 16, 2014 at 23:30
  • Ah, fair enough. I mistakenly thought the Counter contents were maintained in order, but it looks like most_common(n) traverses the collection using heapq.nlargest. Agreed that once you consider destructuring the result it negates the simplicity benefit.
    – Weeble
    Jul 17, 2014 at 8:20
3

Using Counter:

>>> from collections import Counter

It is as simple as:

>>> Counter(zip(x_lst, y_lst)).most_common(1)[0][0]
(1, 6)

Step by step

Building list of points:

>>> x_lst = [1, 3, 1, 4]
>>> y_lst = [6, 7, 6, 1]
>>> pnts = zip(x_lst, y_lst)
>>> pnts
[(1, 6), (3, 7), (1, 6), (4, 1)]

Creating a counter, which is able counting all the items:

>>> counter = Counter(pnts)
>>> counter
Counter({(1, 6): 2, (3, 7): 1, (4, 1): 1})

Getting list of (one) the most common items:

>>> counter.most_common(1)
[((1, 6), 2)]

Getting the item itself:

>>> counter.most_common(1)[0][0]
(1, 6)
1

@jan-vlcinsky is right spot on. Another simpler which seem to be working is as following. I have not compared the performances though.

REPL: https://repl.it/C9jQ/0

Gist: https://gist.github.com/ablaze8/845107aa8045507057c1e71b81f228f4

Blog Post: https://WildClick.WordPress.com/

import itertools

a = [7, 3]
b = [3, 1, 2]
c = [4, 3, 5]


def allEqual(t):
    same = True

    if len(t) == 1:
        return True

    if len(t) == 0:
        return False

    for i in range(1, len(t)):
        if t[i] != t[i - 1]:
            same = False
            i = len(t) - 1
        else:
            same = same and True

    return same


combo = list(itertools.product(a, b, c))
# print list(itertools.permutations(a,2))
# print combo

# combo = [x for x in combo if x[0]==x[1]==x[2]]
# print combo

combo = [x for x in combo if allEqual(x)]
print combo

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