65

I am getting an interesting error while trying to use Unpickler.load(), here is the source code:

open(target, 'a').close()
scores = {};
with open(target, "rb") as file:
    unpickler = pickle.Unpickler(file);
    scores = unpickler.load();
    if not isinstance(scores, dict):
        scores = {};

Here is the traceback:

Traceback (most recent call last):
File "G:\python\pendu\user_test.py", line 3, in <module>:
    save_user_points("Magix", 30);
File "G:\python\pendu\user.py", line 22, in save_user_points:
    scores = unpickler.load();
EOFError: Ran out of input

The file I am trying to read is empty. How can I avoid getting this error, and get an empty variable instead?

77

I would check that the file is not empty first:

import os

scores = {} # scores is an empty dict already

if os.path.getsize(target) > 0:      
    with open(target, "rb") as f:
        unpickler = pickle.Unpickler(f)
        # if file is not empty scores will be equal
        # to the value unpickled
        scores = unpickler.load()

Also open(target, 'a').close() is doing nothing in your code and you don't need to use ;.

  • open(target, 'a').close() is here to make sure the file exists ;-) + I don't need to use ; but I just came from C, and not using ; at the end of my lines make my cry T.T – Magix Jul 16 '14 at 23:00
  • ok, but the issinstance is unnecessary as I imagine you are only going to be pickling a dict, checking for an empty file will suffice – Padraic Cunningham Jul 16 '14 at 23:01
  • furthermore, checking the file is not empty will not always mean I can unpickle it... raising an exception... That's why I don't think your answer is not the best, even thought it is not bad. – Magix Jul 16 '14 at 23:04
  • 1
    catching an EOF exception won't save you from all the other potential errors. – Padraic Cunningham Jul 16 '14 at 23:06
  • 1
    you can check if a file exists using the os module also, might be better than opening and closing a file every time . – Padraic Cunningham Jul 16 '14 at 23:12
63

Most of the answers here have dealt with how to mange EOFError exceptions, which is really handy if you're unsure about whether the pickled object is empty or not.

However, if you're surprised that the pickle file is empty, it could be because you opened the filename through 'wb' or some other mode that could have over-written the file.

for example:

filename = 'cd.pkl'
with open(filename, 'wb') as f:
    classification_dict = pickle.load(f)

This will over-write the pickled file. You might have done this by mistake before using:

...
open(filename, 'rb') as f:

And then got the EOFError because the previous block of code over-wrote the cd.pkl file.

When working in Jupyter, or in the console (Spyder) I usually write a wrapper over the reading/writing code, and call the wrapper subsequently. This avoids common read-write mistakes, and saves a bit of time if you're going to be reading the same file multiple times through your travails

  • 15
    However, if you're surprised that the pickle file is empty, it could be because you opened the filename through 'wb' or some other mode that could have over-written the file This made you win +1 – Neb Apr 11 '18 at 13:55
  • 3
    I just did this; really appreciate this note (I'm glad I'm not the only one!) – zlipp Apr 25 '18 at 17:47
  • have also overwritten it before with "wb". +1 – gebbissimo Feb 1 at 14:53
  • welcome to the club :) – CodeWarrior Feb 1 at 15:18
  • Sometimes the obvious is not obvious at all! Thanks :) – jerpint Mar 23 at 20:35
3

As you see, that's actually a natural error ..

A typical construct for reading from an Unpickler object would be like this ..

try:
    data = unpickler.load()
except EOFError:
    data = list()  # or whatever you want

EOFError is simply raised, because it was reading an empty file, it just meant End of File ..

1

You can catch that exception and return whatever you want from there.

open(target, 'a').close()
scores = {};
try:
    with open(target, "rb") as file:
        unpickler = pickle.Unpickler(file);
        scores = unpickler.load();
        if not isinstance(scores, dict):
            scores = {};
except EOFError:
    return {}
  • 10
    The problem with this is that it's going to silently hide corrupted files. – Ross Ridge Jul 16 '14 at 23:08
1
if path.exists(Score_file):
      try : 
         with open(Score_file , "rb") as prev_Scr:

            return Unpickler(prev_Scr).load()

    except EOFError : 

        return dict() 
  • 1
    Hellow and welcome to Stackoverflow. Can you explain this code a bit please? – Alexander Mar 30 '18 at 21:47

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