2

So I have log files that come in the form of

n400_108tb_48gb           2   G    1,3-7                1       20G /  286T (< 1% ) 
n400_108tb_48gb:1         1   D    1-3:bay1-6           -      2.1G /   48T (< 1% ) 
n400_108tb_48gb:3         3   D    1-3:bay7-12          -      1.9G /   48T (< 1% ) 
n400_108tb_48gb:4         4   D    1-3:bay13-18         -       10G /   48T (< 1% ) 
n400_108tb_48gb:5         5   D    1-3:bay19-24         -      2.0G /   48T (< 1% ) 
n400_108tb_48gb:6         6   D    1-3:bay25-30         -      2.2G /   48T (< 1% ) 
n400_108tb_48gb:7         7   D    1-3:bay31-36         -      1.7G /   48T (< 1% ) 

That seems nice and simple to deal with so I can just write regular expressions to deal with that one line at a time.

([0-9a-z_:]*)\s*([1-9])\s*([DGPTE])\s*([0-9a-z_:,-]*)\s*([1-9])\s*([0-9.]+[KMGTPE]).*?([0-9]*[KMGTPE])

I mean, that's ugly but I can simplify it to

_name =  r"([0-9a-z_:]*)\s*"
_id = r"([1-9])
_type = r"([DGPTE])"
_members = r"([0-9a-z_:,-]*)"
_vhs = r"([1-9-])"
_used = r"([0-9.]*[KMGTPE])"
_size = r"([0-9.]*[KMGTPE])"
_disk_protections_regex_string = r"{0}\s*{1}\s*{2}\s*{3}\s*{4}\s*{5}.*?{6}".format(
    _name,
    _id,
    _type,
    _members,
    _vhs,
    _used,
    _size,)

Then I discovered that I have to parse files with this format.

s200_13tb_400gb  1     +3 system, vhs_de 1:0-23,      1      53T /  218T (25% )
-ssd_48gb-ram             ny_writes, vhs 2:0-23, 3:0-                          
                          _hide_spare,   1,3-19,21-25                          
                          ssd_metadata   , 4:0-23,                             
                                         5:0-23,                               
                                         6:0-23,                               
                                         7:0-23,                               
                                         8:0-23,                               
                                         9:0-23,                               
                                         10:0-23,                              
                                         11:0-23,                              
                                         12:0-23,                              
                                         13:0-23,                              
                                         14:0-23,                              
                                         15:0-23,                              
                                         16:0-23,                              
                                         17:0-23,                              
                                         18:2-25                               

and suddenly The expected values are

s200_13tb_400gb-ssd_48gb-ram 
system vhs_deny_writes, vhs_hide_spare, ssd_metadata
1:0-23, 2:0-23, 3:0-1,3-19,21-25, 4:0-23, 5:0-23, 6:0-23, 7:0-23, 8:0-23, 9:0-23, 10:0-23, 11:0-23, 12:0-23, 13:0-23, 14:0-23, 15:0-23, 16:0-23, 17:0-23, 18:0-23,

As well as the original formatting I presented. I don't even know where to start with white space delimited column separated values.

  • "Whitespace delimited" = tabs, spaces, or any combination? – usr2564301 Jul 16 '14 at 23:02
  • It looks like it's just spaces but at this point I'm making no assumptions given the huge differences in formatting I've found in these files. – AlexLordThorsen Jul 16 '14 at 23:18
  • is your input unaligned like the second third and fourth rows of the third column or is it a typo? – Padraic Cunningham Jul 16 '14 at 23:31
  • 1
    Sadly, the data present is an exact copy and paste from the file. – AlexLordThorsen Jul 17 '14 at 0:52
  • 1
    Are there multiple records per file (for the collimated format)? If so any indication of how they are delimited? – wwii Jul 17 '14 at 16:00
2

I've created a more dynamic method, which finds the column definitions itself.

Explanation

  1. The script first looks in the file for columns where in each line the character is a whitespace.
  2. It then defines the data column definitions based on being between whitespace columns. + [len(content[0])] adds an additional whitespace column at the end making the last data column accessible if needed.
  3. The data is extracted with the defined columns.
  4. The data is printed if it matches the specific defined patterns. Warning: If you have multiple records per file, you will have to change this step.

Code

import re
from collections import Counter

# Patterns to save in the end, [name, attr, values]
patterns = [r"^([0-9a-z_-]{4,}$)", r"^([a-z_,\s]*$)", r"([0-9:,\s-]{4,})$"]

# Get file content, remove any trailing empty line.
with open('/path/to/my/file') as f:
    content = f.read().split('\n')
    if not content[-1]:
        content = content[:-1]

# 1) Find all single character columns in content with only whitespaces.
no_lines = len(content)
whitespaces = [i for l in content for i, char in enumerate(l) if char == ' ']
whi_columns = [k for k, v in Counter(whitespaces).iteritems() if v == no_lines]
#                                                .items() in python3
# 2) Get all real columns that are between whitespace columns.
columns_defs = []
for i, whi_col in enumerate(whi_columns + [len(content[0])]):
    if whi_col and not i: #special first column
        columns_defs.append(slice(whi_col))
    if whi_col > whi_columns[i - 1] + 1:
        columns_defs.append(slice(whi_columns[i - 1] + 1, whi_col))

# 3) Extract columns from file content.
data_columns = [[line[col].strip() for line in content] for col in columns_defs]

# 4) Save columns fitting patterns.
for data_col in data_columns:
    data = ''.join(data_col)
    if re.match(r'|'.join(patterns), data):
        print data

Output

s200_13tb_400gb-ssd_48gb-ram
system, vhs_deny_writes, vhs_hide_spare,ssd_metadata
1:0-23,2:0-23, 3:0-1,3-19,21-25, 4:0-23,5:0-23,6:0-23,7:0-23,8:0-23,9:0-23,10:0-23,11:0-23,12:0-23,13:0-23,14:0-23,15:0-23,16:0-23,17:0-23,18:2-25
  • This answer works but it also breaks my brain. =P – AlexLordThorsen Aug 8 '14 at 23:44
0

Define slices for the columns then aggregate the data in each line

col_1 = slice(17)
col_2 = slice(25,40)
col_3 = slice(41,54)
col_4 = slice(55,None)
one, two, three, four = list(), list(), list(), list()

with open('file.txt') as f:
    for line in f:
        one.append(line[col_1])
        two.append(line[col_2])
        three.append(line[col_3])
        four.append(line[col_4])

print ''.join(item.strip() for item in one)
print ''.join(item.strip() for item in two)
print ''.join(item.strip() for item in three)
print ''.join(item.strip() for item in four)

>>> 
s200_13tb_400gb-ssd_48gb-ram
system, vhs_deny_writes, vhs_hide_spare,ssd_metadata
1:0-23,2:0-23, 3:0-1,3-19,21-25, 4:0-23,5:0-23,6:0-23,7:0-23,8:0-23,9:0-23,10:0-23,11:0-23,12:0-23,13:0-23,14:0-23,15:0-23,16:0-23,17:0-23,18:2-25
53T /  218T (25% )
>>> 

This will extract data from the collimated format shown in the example. If there are multiple records in a file, the record delimiter needs to be determined.

  • This makes the massive assumption that every column is the same width. Read the comment: "I'm making no assumptions given the huge differences in formatting I've found in these files." – Banana Jul 17 '14 at 13:30
  • True that, but the info in the OP's post is limited with no actual question asked. This tries to solve the "I don't even know where to start with white space delimited column separated values." statement from the post. – wwii Jul 17 '14 at 16:09
  • This gets me closer to solving the problem, actually. It seems like (sadly) there are different column widths depending on what version of our codebase generated the files. But that changes the problem to determining the version and using different widths depending on the version found. Much easier problem. – AlexLordThorsen Jul 17 '14 at 19:15
  • Those ones and the plus-three on the first line sure look like they are delimiters - visually anyway. – wwii Jul 17 '14 at 23:39

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