264

What is the easiest (best) way to find the sum of an array of integers in swift? I have an array called multiples and I would like to know the sum of the multiples.

16 Answers 16

523

This is the easiest/shortest method I can find.

Swift 3 and Swift 4:

let multiples = [...]
let sum = multiples.reduce(0, +)
print("Sum of Array is : ", sum)

Swift 2:

let multiples = [...]
sum = multiples.reduce(0, combine: +)

Some more info:

This uses Array's reduce method (documentation here), which allows you to "reduce a collection of elements down to a single value by recursively applying the provided closure". We give it 0 as the initial value, and then, essentially, the closure { $0 + $1 }. Of course, we can simplify that to a single plus sign, because that's how Swift rolls.

7
  • 49
    Thanks for this answer. It works great and I just want to add my example code with array of custom classes: let totalSum = self.cheques.reduce(0) { $0 + $1.amount} Apr 1 '15 at 17:59
  • 2
    Great answer but missing parameter name combine. Should be multiples.reduce(0, combine: +).
    – Evgenii
    May 9 '15 at 1:05
  • 2
    Is it faster than a for loop?
    – lorenzo
    May 26 '16 at 14:56
  • 2
    @SwiftMatt Try using a flatMap on it first to flatten it to a single dimension array. multiArray.flatMap{$0}.reduce(0, combine: +)
    – Samah
    Jul 19 '16 at 4:33
  • 3
    @lorenzo - Testing on an iPhone 7 with latest Swift and XCode (a simple array filled with 1,000,000 UInt32 random values capped at 256 to prevent UInt32 overflow) interestingly shows the 'for' loop being just a hair faster (1.941 seconds versus 2.137 seconds), although that advantage is not present at 100,000 values (0.23 seconds each). IMHO, code clarity is worth any very minor performance cost here even when dealing with 32MB arrays.
    – Tom Dibble
    May 21 '18 at 17:42
114

Swift 3+ one liner to sum properties of objects

var totalSum = scaleData.map({$0.points}).reduce(0, +)

Where points is the property in my custom object scaleData that I am trying to reduce

1
  • This will unnecessarily iterate the whole collection twice
    – Leo Dabus
    Mar 21 at 16:42
38

In Swift 4 You can also constrain the sequence elements to Numeric protocol to return the sum of all elements in the sequence as follow

extension Sequence where Element: Numeric {
    /// Returns the sum of all elements in the collection
    func sum() -> Element { return reduce(0, +) }
}

edit/update:

Xcode 10.2 • Swift 5 or later

We can simply constrain the sequence elements to the new AdditiveArithmetic protocol to return the sum of all elements in the collection

extension Sequence where Element: AdditiveArithmetic {
    func sum() -> Element {
        return reduce(.zero, +)
    }
}

Xcode 11 • Swift 5.1 or later

extension Sequence where Element: AdditiveArithmetic {
    func sum() -> Element { reduce(.zero, +) }
}

let numbers = [1,2,3]
numbers.sum()    // 6

let doubles = [1.5, 2.7, 3.0]
doubles.sum()    // 7.2

To sum a property of a custom object we can extend Sequence to take a predicate to return a value that conforms to AdditiveArithmetic:

extension Sequence  {
    func sum<T: AdditiveArithmetic>(_ predicate: (Element) -> T) -> T { reduce(.zero) { $0 + predicate($1) } }
}

Usage:

struct Product {
    let id: String
    let price: Decimal
}

let products: [Product] = [.init(id: "abc", price: 21.9),
                           .init(id: "xyz", price: 19.7),
                           .init(id: "jkl", price: 2.9)
]

products.sum(\.price)  // 44.5
1
  • 2
    Great, nice solution!
    – sabiland
    Aug 23 '19 at 10:55
31

Swift3 has changed to :

let multiples = [...]
sum = multiples.reduce(0, +)
16

Swift 4 example

class Employee {
    var salary: Int =  0
    init (_ salary: Int){
        self.salary = salary
    }
}

let employees = [Employee(100),Employee(300),Employee(600)]
var sumSalary = employees.reduce(0, {$0 + $1.salary}) //1000
1
  • Very helpful because it includes an example of totaling an arithmetic property for an array of objects, which is what I needed to do.
    – Carl Smith
    May 15 at 8:52
13

This also works:

let arr = [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10]
var sumedArr = arr.reduce(0, combine: {$0 + $1})
print(sumedArr)

The result will be: 55

10

Swift 3

If you have an array of generic objects and you want to sum some object property then:

class A: NSObject {
    var value = 0
    init(value: Int) {
       self.value = value
    }
}

let array = [A(value: 2), A(value: 4)]      
let sum = array.reduce(0, { $0 + $1.value })
//                           ^       ^
//                        $0=result  $1=next A object
print(sum) // 6 

Despite of the shorter form, many times you may prefer the classic for-cycle:

let array = [A(value: 2), A(value: 4)]
var sum = 0
array.forEach({ sum += $0.value}) 
// or
for element in array {
   sum += element.value
}
2
  • 1
    ciao Luca, here is my solution: array.map({$0.value}).reduce(0, +) May 12 '17 at 10:26
  • 2
    In this way you write more code and increment complexity.. so, why? May 12 '17 at 10:40
6

Swift 3, 4, and 5

Using reduce:

let totalAmount = yourTransactionsModelArray.reduce(0) { $0 + $1.amount}

Old fashioned way for understanding purposes:

for (var i = 0; i < n; i++) {
 sum = sum + Int(multiples[i])!
}

//where n = number of elements in the array

3
  • Note that in Swift 3 this is no longer valid because the C style for loops have been removed from the language. Use for-in loops instead, Swift keeps track internally of the index.
    – donarb
    Feb 17 '17 at 8:27
  • 1
    That wouldn't work as it. You have to initialise sum to 0 first. The beauty of reduce is that it reminds you to think of the initial value. Mar 4 '17 at 11:24
  • var sum = 0 ; for n in multiples { sum += n } although I would use reduce.
    – JeremyP
    Mar 1 '18 at 10:14
2

A possible solution: define a prefix operator for it. Like the reduce "+/" operator as in APL (e.g. GNU APL)

A bit of a different approach here.

Using a protocol en generic type allows us to to use this operator on Double, Float and Int array types

protocol Number 
{
   func +(l: Self, r: Self) -> Self
   func -(l: Self, r: Self) -> Self
   func >(l: Self, r: Self) -> Bool
   func <(l: Self, r: Self) -> Bool
}

extension Double : Number {}
extension Float  : Number {}
extension Int    : Number {}

infix operator += {}

func += <T:Number> (inout left: T, right: T)
{
   left = left + right
}

prefix operator +/ {}

prefix func +/ <T:Number>(ar:[T]?) -> T?
{
    switch true
    {
    case ar == nil:
        return nil

    case ar!.isEmpty:
        return nil

    default:
        var result = ar![0]
        for n in 1..<ar!.count
        {
            result += ar![n]
        }
        return result
   }
}

use like so:

let nmbrs = [ 12.4, 35.6, 456.65, 43.45 ]
let intarr = [1, 34, 23, 54, 56, -67, 0, 44]

+/nmbrs     // 548.1
+/intarr    // 145

(updated for Swift 2.2, tested in Xcode Version 7.3)

1
  • One issue with this is that often (at least, when dealing with large arrays) you will need the sum to be a different type than the components. For instance, if you have a million UInt32s running the gamut from 0 to 2^32-1 (ex, populated by arc4random()), adding those up will overflow your UInt32 "sum" value every time.
    – Tom Dibble
    May 21 '18 at 17:51
2

Swift 3.0

i had the same problem, i found on the documentation Apple this solution.

let numbers = [1, 2, 3, 4]
let addTwo: (Int, Int) -> Int = { x, y in x + y }
let numberSum = numbers.reduce(0, addTwo)
// 'numberSum' == 10

But, in my case i had a list of object, then i needed transform my value of my list:

let numberSum = self.list.map({$0.number_here}).reduce(0, { x, y in x + y })

this work for me.

0

Keep it simple...

var array = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 0]
var n = 0
for i in array {
    n += i
}
print("My sum of elements is: \(n)")

Output:

My sum of elements is: 37

0

another easy way of getting it done:

let sumOfMultiples = ar.reduce(0) { x, y in x + y }          
print(sumOfMultiples)
New contributor
geekMe is a new contributor to this site. Take care in asking for clarification, commenting, and answering. Check out our Code of Conduct.
-1

For me, it was like this using property

    let blueKills = match.blueTeam.participants.reduce(0, { (result, participant) -> Int in
        result + participant.kills
    })
-2
@IBOutlet var valueSource: [MultipleIntBoundSource]!

private var allFieldsCount: Int {
    var sum = 0
    valueSource.forEach { sum += $0.count }
    return sum
}

used this one for nested parameters

-4

For sum of elements in array of Objects

self.rankDataModelArray.flatMap{$0.count}.reduce(0, +)
-5

Swift 3

From all the options displayed here, this is the one that worked for me.

let arr = [6,1,2,3,4,10,11]


var sumedArr = arr.reduce(0, { ($0 + $1)})
print(sumedArr)
1
  • This is just a copy of another answer May 17 '18 at 11:37

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.