9

I need to parse fragments of user-written C# code and replace all variables that aren't defined locally with method calls. I.e.

public class Foo
{
  public dynamic Bar()
  {
     return Math.Min(x + width, maxWidth);
  }
}

has to become:

public class Foo
{
  public dynamic Bar()
  {
      return Math.Min(Resolve("x") + Resolve("width"), Resolve("maxWidth"));
  }
}

I'm using Microsoft.CodeAnalysis.CSharp and the CSharpSyntaxTree to examine the string, but it doesn't give me enough information to perform the replace. Or if it does, I don't know where to look for it. I've pasted the SyntaxTree layout below. All the variables occur as IdentifierName nodes, but I don't know how to tell different IdentifierNames apart. Where to go from here?

CompilationUnit[0..99) {
 code:  public class Foo\n{\n  public dynamic Bar()\n  {\n    return Math.Min(x + width, maxWidth);\n  }\n}
 tokens: EndOfFileToken[] 
 nodes{
  ClassDeclaration[0..99) {
   code:  public class Foo\n{\n  public dynamic Bar()\n  {\n    return Math.Min(x + width, maxWidth);\n  }\n}
   tokens: PublicKeyword[public ] ClassKeyword[class ] IdentifierToken[Foo\n] OpenBraceToken[{\n] CloseBraceToken[}] 
   nodes{
    MethodDeclaration[21..98) {
     code:    public dynamic Bar()\n  {\n    return Math.Min(x + width, maxWidth);\n  }\n
     tokens: PublicKeyword[  public ] IdentifierToken[Bar] 
     nodes{
      IdentifierName[30..38) {
       code:  dynamic 
       tokens: IdentifierToken[dynamic ] 
      }
      ParameterList[41..45) {
       code:  ()\n
       tokens: OpenParenToken[(] CloseParenToken[)\n] 
      }
      Block[45..98) {
       code:    {\n    return Math.Min(x + width, maxWidth);\n  }\n
       tokens: OpenBraceToken[  {\n] CloseBraceToken[  }\n] 
       nodes{
        ReturnStatement[50..93) {
         code:      return Math.Min(x + width, maxWidth);\n
         tokens: ReturnKeyword[    return ] SemicolonToken[;\n] 
         nodes{
          InvocationExpression[61..90) {
           code:  Math.Min(x + width, maxWidth)
           nodes{
            SimpleMemberAccessExpression[61..69) {
             code:  Math.Min
             tokens: DotToken[.] 
             nodes{
              IdentifierName[61..65) {
               code:  Math
               tokens: IdentifierToken[Math] 
              }
              IdentifierName[66..69) {
               code:  Min
               tokens: IdentifierToken[Min] 
              }
             }
            }
            ArgumentList[69..90) {
             code:  (x + width, maxWidth)
             tokens: OpenParenToken[(] CommaToken[, ] CloseParenToken[)] 
             nodes{
              Argument[70..79) {
               code:  x + width
               nodes{
                AddExpression[70..79) {
                 code:  x + width
                 tokens: PlusToken[+ ] 
                 nodes{
                  IdentifierName[70..72) {
                   code:  x 
                   tokens: IdentifierToken[x ] 
                  }
                  IdentifierName[74..79) {
                   code:  width
                   tokens: IdentifierToken[width] 
                  }
                 }
                }
               }
              }
              Argument[81..89) {
               code:  maxWidth
               nodes{
                IdentifierName[81..89) {
                 code:  maxWidth
                 tokens: IdentifierToken[maxWidth] 
                }
               }
              }
             }
            }
           }
          }
         }
        }
       }
      }
     }
    }
   }
  }
 }
}
  • 1
    The syntax tree will not be enough, you need to look at the semantic model to see what the identifiers represent. – Thomas Levesque Jul 17 '14 at 8:22
  • Can you provide a link where I can go and read up on semantic models? – David Rutten Jul 17 '14 at 8:26
  • Looking for it now... I haven't looked at Roslyn in a while, and the API has changed a lot since last time – Thomas Levesque Jul 17 '14 at 8:34
  • 1
    This link gives some information, but it's already a bit outdated... ebeid-soliman.blogspot.fr/2013/08/… – Thomas Levesque Jul 17 '14 at 9:02
  • Thanks Thomas, outdated Roslyn tutorials are pretty much the bane of my existence right now :) – David Rutten Jul 17 '14 at 9:51
7

I think you need to use the semantic model. Here's a (very basic) example that shows how to find unresolved symbols:

var tree = CSharpSyntaxTree.ParseFile(fileName);
var root = tree.GetRoot();
var refs = new MetadataReference[]
{
    new MetadataFileReference(@"C:\Windows\Microsoft.NET\Framework\v4.0.30319\mscorlib.dll", new MetadataReferenceProperties(MetadataImageKind.Assembly))
};
var compilation = CSharpCompilation.Create("testRoslyn", new[] { tree }, refs);
var model = compilation.GetSemanticModel(tree);

var unknownSymbols =
    from node in root.DescendantNodes()
    where node.IsKind(SyntaxKind.IdentifierName)
    let symbolInfo = model.GetSymbolInfo(node)
    where symbolInfo.Symbol == null && !symbolInfo.CandidateSymbols.Any()
    select node;

From there you can replace the nodes with Resolve(name).

  • Well, that all works perfectly fine, I'm still totally stuck on how to replace the nodes though. There's something about the logic behind Microsoft.CodeAnalysis that I just don't get yet... – David Rutten Jul 17 '14 at 16:22
  • 1
    Have you read the FAQ yet? They discuss replacing sub-expressions there: roslyn.codeplex.com/… – JoshVarty Jul 17 '14 at 16:46
  • I seem to be unable to download the SDK Preview which is supposed to contain the examples. The link takes me to connect.microsoft.com/VisualStudio instead and it's all downhill from there. I've searched my computer for faq.cs and anything else I could think of, but no joy. – David Rutten Jul 17 '14 at 18:30
  • @DavidRutten, on the page you mention, just click the "Downloads" link – Thomas Levesque Jul 17 '14 at 18:38
  • 2
    No trust me, none of that works today. But I figured out how to use ReplaceNodes using the advice on this post: stackoverflow.com/questions/20155266/… – David Rutten Jul 17 '14 at 18:53
2

This post doesn't really offer you a solution to your problem, but instead another way that may be easier to implement, but introduce a change for the user. I post here only as an idea.

The objective is not to allow the user to write x but instead Var.x or Var.maxWidth

Then, when parsing your C# code, you just need to insert code for a property Var of type CustomDynamicObject (or any name you want to give)

public (static?) CustomDynamicObject Var { get { /* create the object once and return */ }}

Then you can defined CustomDynamicObject inheriting DynamicObject, so that you can intercept all calls to undefined methods/property

DynamicObject and using dynamic feature of .NET 4 is just a way to intercept call, but you can google for other techniques.

  • I'd rather not put any responsibility on the user if I can help it. It's an interesting idea, but initially I'd like to solve it without the user code having to be different from regular C# code. – David Rutten Jul 17 '14 at 10:02
  • Yes it's why I post it "as an idea". If you don't find any solution to your problem, it may be a backup solution. But you're entirely right there must be the least possible stress on the user. – Fabske Jul 17 '14 at 12:40
1

Perhaps you accidentally paste CSharpSyntaxTree of code without declaration "double width = 10.0;"? If so, you get this additional declarations in your CSharpSyntaxTree.

All you need to do is just scan the tree for IdentifierToken`s that not declarated in user code, all this tokens have positions that you must use for replace variables acces code to method call code.

  • I mistakenly changed the code later to show both defined an undefined variables, forgetting that the code tree would then become invalid. I changed it back. – David Rutten Jul 17 '14 at 10:03

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