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I am developing a library (jar) for android and have come into a situation where I want my class or method to be accessible within my library only, but not outside my library. Using no modifier will make class accessible within that package, but I am in a situation that this class cannot be used without public modifier, because using no modifier will make it inaccessible in other packages which I do not want. For example, I have a class say,

public class Globals {

    public static String thisDeviceAddress;
    public static String thisDeviceIP;
    public static String thisDeviceName = "";

}

This class is accessible everywhere. The problem is that I want it to be accessible within my library that I am developing, but not outside the library. I have come to know that using annotation @hide will solve the issue. For example:

/**
 * @hide
 */
class Globals {

    public static String thisDeviceAddress;
    public static String thisDeviceIP;
    public static String thisDeviceName = "";
}

I googled alot about it but could not find a way to implement @hide. Just using @hide without a library didn't hide the class. So, please provide me proper guidance. Any library to be used? any way out to solve this problem?

  • @hide won't work - it just removes a symbol from the stub android.jar when the SDK is built so code cannot be written to directly access them. The symbols will be there in the runtime and can be accessed via reflection. But that's not a solution to your problem. – laalto Jul 17 '14 at 9:28
  • Thanks for replying. I have no problem if class/method get accessed via reflection. But I do not want it to be directly visible. If it works,please let me know what needs to be setup to use @hide. – Dipendra Jul 17 '14 at 9:30
  • @Dipendra, I have same situation here. Did you find out a solution for this? – Felipe Mosso Sep 15 '16 at 13:47
0

There are no way to hide public classes and methods. It's Java language specification and you cannot broke that.

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