22

I just want to understand if there is a difference between names and colnames when working with data.frame. Both seems to behave the same way. Can I subsitute one by the other?

  • 3
    From ?colnames: "For a data frame, rownames and colnames eventually call row.names and names respectively, but the latter are preferred." – Henrik Jul 17 '14 at 9:12
20

Are they the same for data.frames? YES

Are they the same in general? Not quite--the big difference is that colnames also works for matrices, whereas names does not (just dataframes).

In addition, you can use names to set/get the names of vectors (and, for obvious reasons, you can't do this with colnames--the result is NULL for getting and an error for setting).

  • names works on vectors too. And it actually does work on matrices... it just does not do what you expect it to do! – nico Jul 17 '14 at 9:15
  • 2
    Re: "names" and matrices--that's kind of a loose notion of "working"... Nevertheless, point taken. – Steve S Jul 17 '14 at 9:34
  • 1
    just kidding, was mostly to point out that it won't throw an error, and in some cases it may slip through :) – nico Jul 17 '14 at 11:01
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    @SteveS Can you precise "for obvious reasons"? Doesn't seem so obvious to me ;) – Aurélien Gasser Feb 4 '17 at 17:31
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    @AurélienGasser, you're right: I'm not even sure myself why I thought that was so obvious at the time... But to answer your question, colnames only works for matrix-like objects with at least two dimensions (since it must have rows and columns) and, as a result, it doesn't work for vectors (since they don't have columns (or even a 'dim' attribute)). – Steve S Feb 9 '17 at 18:06
9

If you look at the beginning of the colnames and colnames<- functions source code :

R> colnames
function (x, do.NULL = TRUE, prefix = "col") 
{
    if (is.data.frame(x) && do.NULL) 
        return(names(x))
(...)


R> `colnames<-`
function (x, value) 
{
    if (is.data.frame(x)) {
        names(x) <- value
    }
(...)

You can see that for data frames, colnames just call the names function. So yes, they are strictly equivalent.

3

names() crates name attributes where as colnames()simply names the columns.

i.e.

Create a temp variable.

> temp <- rbind(cbind(1,2,3,4,5),
+               cbind(6,7,8,9,10))

> temp
     [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4] [,5]
[1,]    1    2    3    4    5
[2,]    6    7    8    9   10

Create the names.temp object.

> names.temp <- temp

Use names() on names.temp

> names(names.temp) <- paste(c("First col", "Second col", "Third col",
 "Fourth Col", "Fifth col"))

> names.temp
     [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4] [,5]
[1,]    1    2    3    4    5
[2,]    6    7    8    9   10
attr(,"names")
 [1] "First col"  "Second col" "Third col"  "Fourth Col" "Fifth col"  
 NA NA NA          
 [9] NA NA      

We see here we can actually call the 5th name attribute in names.temp.

> names(names.temp)[5]
[1] "Fifth col"    

Repeat with a second object but this time create the colnames.temp object.

> colnames.temp <- temp

Use colnames() on colnames.temp

> colnames(colnames.temp) <- paste(c("First col", "Second col", "Third col",
 "Fourth Col", "Fifth col"))

> colnames.temp
     First col Second col Third col Fourth Col Fifth col
[1,]         1          2         3          4         5
[2,]         6          7         8          9        10

Now name attribute is NULL.

> names(colnames.temp)[5]
NULL

FINALLY. Let's look at our trusty str() command. We can see there is a structural difference between names.temp and colnames.temp. Specifically, colnames.temp has dimnames attributes not names attributes.

> str(names.temp)
 num [1:2, 1:5] 1 6 2 7 3 8 4 9 5 10
 - attr(*, "names")= chr [1:10] "First col" "Second col" "Thrid col" "Fourth     
Col" ...
> str(colnames.temp)
 num [1:2, 1:5] 1 6 2 7 3 8 4 9 5 10
 - attr(*, "dimnames")=List of 2
  ..$ : NULL
  ..$ : chr [1:5] "First col" "Second col" "Thrid col" "Fourth Col" ...
  • 2
    Nice first answer, but names() does not create names. names<- does. It is a different function. – Frank Feb 3 '17 at 18:20
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    I stand corrected. The implication (read assumption) was to invoke names() implies the desire to name which is poor logic. Thanks Frank. – n00b by nature Feb 3 '17 at 18:24
1

As far as I am concerned, the only difference between names() and colnames() with respect to a data.frame input is that they allocated memory slightly differently. For instance, consider the code chunk below:

    df <- data.frame(x=1:5, y=6:10, z=11:15)
    tracemem(df)
    names(df) <- c("A", "B", "C")
    colnames(df) <- c('a','b','c') 

If you run this code, you will see that the copying of df only occurs once during the names() call, whereas the copying of df occurs twice during the colnames() call.

  • 3
    If you don't like copying, use data.table::setnames (which you can use on data.frames). – Frank Feb 3 '17 at 18:21

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