8

I am using the Slim Framework for a simple crud-style application. My index.php file has become quite long and unwieldy with all the different routes. How can I clean up / refactor this code? For example I have code like the following for all the different routes and GET, POST, PUT, DELETE etc.

$app->get("/login", function() use ($app)
{//code here.....});
14

What I like to do is group routes, and for each group, I create a new file under a subdir called routes. To illustrate with some example code from the Slim docs:

index.php:

$app = new \Slim\Slim();
$routeFiles = (array) glob(__DIR__ . DIRECTORY_SEPARATOR . 'routes' . DIRECTORY_SEPARATOR . '*.php');
foreach($routeFiles as $routeFile) {
  require_once $routeFile;
}
$app->run();

routes/api.php:

// API group
$app->group('/api', function () use ($app) {

    // Library group
    $app->group('/library', function () use ($app) {

        // Get book with ID
        $app->get('/books/:id', function ($id) {

        });

        // Update book with ID
        $app->put('/books/:id', function ($id) {

        });

        // Delete book with ID
        $app->delete('/books/:id', function ($id) {

        });

    });

});

You can even do this for multiple levels, just be sure you don't overcomplicate yourself for this.

You can also do this for hooks off course.

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  • 1
    This solution might have performance issues if the app grows too much.. as opening all the files in routes directory can lead to unnecessary file loading (disk access) and parsing (cpu/memory intensive)... – KnF Jan 15 '17 at 16:48
8

You can for example move code the inner code to class:

$app->get("/login", function() use ($app)
{
    $user = new User();
    $user->login();
});

or even create your own class that will handle routing

class Router {

    public function __construct($app) {
       $this->app = $app;
    }

   public function createRoutes() {
     $this->app->get("/login", function() use ($this->app)
     {
        $user = new User();
        $user->login();
      });

      // other routes, you may divide routes to class methods
   }
}

and then in your index.php

$router = new Router($app);
$router->createRoutes();
| improve this answer | |
5

You can move index.php content into diferent files and just include them. For example:

index.php:

$app = new \Slim\Slim();
...
require_once 'path_to_your_dir/routes.php';
...
$app->run();

routes.php:

$app->get('/hello/:name', function ($name) {
    echo "Hello, $name";
});
...

Or you can even create different files for different routes types:

index.php:

$app = new \Slim\Slim();
...
require_once 'path_to_your_dir/routes.php';
require_once 'path_to_your_dir/admin_routes.php';
require_once 'path_to_your_dir/some_other_routes.php';
...
$app->run();

Same approach is also ok for DI services initialization etc. (everything from your index.php)

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3

This is how i use Slim. I do have a single file with the routes but i use a three layer approach.

index.php - i don't handle any logic here. i just register the routes and consume the api methods (post, put, delete, etc).

$app->post('/bible/comment/', function() use($ioc) {
    $ioc['commentApi']->post();
});

The API layers inherit a base class where it's inject the slim app object. From there i use helper methods to extract the data from requests using arrays with the required fields, optional fields, etc. I don't do validation here. This is also where i clean the requests for xss.

Most important, i handle the exceptions here. Invalid requests throws exceptions, which are caught and transformed in a error response.

class CommentApi extends BaseApi {
    public function post() {
        $fields = array(array('message', 'bookId', 'chapter', 'verseFrom', 'verseTo')):
        $dtoModel = new Models\CreateComment();
        $data = $this->extractFormData();
        Utils::transformDto($dtoModel, $data, $fields):
        try {
            $result = $this->commentService->create($this->getUserId(), $dtoModel);
            $response->success("You've added a book to the bible."); // helper from BaseApi to set the response 200
            $response->setResult($result);
        }
        catch(\Exceptions\CommentRepeatedException $ex) {
            $response->invalid('The foo already exist. Try a new one');
        }
        catch(\Exceptions\CommentsClosedException $ex) {
            UtilsExceptions::invalidRequest($dtoModel, $ex);
            $response->invalid('Invalid request. Check the error list for more info.');
        }
        $this->respond($response); // encode the response in json, set the content type, etc
}

This layer class consume the business layers which will use repositories and others resources. I test the projects against the business layers, the api layers just extract the data, create the dto models and handle the response.

The request/response models implements interfaces to return a status code, erros messages to be consumed in for the clients (respect is cool to automate this).

class CommentBusiness {
    public function create($userId, Models\CreateComment $model) {
        // Validate the request object
        // Assert all logic requirements
        $dataRes = $this->repository->create('message' => $model->getMessage(), 'bookId' => $model->getUserId(), 'chapter' => $model->getChapter(), 'verseFrom' => $mode->getVerseFrom(), 'verseTo' => $model->getVerseTo());
        if($dataRes->isInvalid()) {
            throw new \Exceptions\DataException($dataRes->getExModel());
        }
        return $dataRes;
    }
}
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2

I like to use classes as route callbacks, and combine that with grouping of routes. Doing that, your index.php file (or wherever you choose to define your routes) will probably become very "Slim":

$app->group('/user', function() use ($app) {
    $app->map('/find/:id', '\User:search')->via('GET');
    $app->map('/insert', '\User:create')->via('POST');
    // ...
});

In this example, the /user/find/:id route will call the search method (passing the value of :id as the first parameter) of the User class. So your callback class might look a bit like this:

class User {
    public function search($userId) {
        // ...
    }
}

There are a number of advantages to this approach, especially if you are writing a CRUD-style application (that needs database access). For example, you can contain all your database logic in a base class and use inherited child classes for the route callbacks. You can also encapsulate all route-group-related logic into separate classes, e.g. having a User class that handles all the /user routes, and so on.

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