38

Consider a data frame of the form

       idnum      start        end
1993.1    17 1993-01-01 1993-12-31
1993.2    17 1993-01-01 1993-12-31
1993.3    17 1993-01-01 1993-12-31

with start and end being of type Date

 $ idnum : int  17 17 17 17 27 27
 $ start : Date, format: "1993-01-01" "1993-01-01" "1993-01-01" "1993-01-01" ...
 $ end   : Date, format: "1993-12-31" "1993-12-31" "1993-12-31" "1993-12-31" ...

I would like to create a new dataframe, that has instead monthly observations for every row, for every month in between start and end (including the boundaries):

Desired Output

idnum       month
   17  1993-01-01
   17  1993-02-01
   17  1993-03-01
...
   17  1993-11-01
   17  1993-12-01

I'm not sure what format month should have, I will at some point want to group by idnum, month for regressions on the rest of the data set.

So far, for every single row, seq(from=test[1,'start'], to=test[1, 'end'], by='1 month') gives me the right sequence - but as soon as I try to apply that to the whole data frame, it will not work:

> foo <- apply(test, 1, function(x) seq(x['start'], to=x['end'], by='1 month'))
Error in to - from : non-numeric argument to binary operator
1
  • As a beginner in R, how am I supposed to judge the answers? Is there a way to check them for efficiency, as %timeit in Python?
    – FooBar
    Jul 17 '14 at 13:51
40

Using data.table:

require(data.table) ## 1.9.2+
setDT(df)[ , list(idnum = idnum, month = seq(start, end, by = "month")), by = 1:nrow(df)]

# you may use dot notation as a shorthand alias of list in j:
setDT(df)[ , .(idnum = idnum, month = seq(start, end, by = "month")), by = 1:nrow(df)]

setDT converts df to a data.table. Then for each row, by = 1:nrow(df), we create idnum and month as required.

4
  • 3
    The most efficient answer as far as I can tell. A short follow-up: say I'd have actually a long list of columns that I want in the new dataframe, not just idnum. Is there an elegant way of providing these? Replacing idnum=idnum with colnames(df) surely won't work.
    – FooBar
    Jul 18 '14 at 13:06
  • On a smallish dataset of about 40k records, this is 25x faster than the dplyr::rowwise() option.
    – Jacob
    Nov 4 '16 at 16:18
  • 3
    How to use multiple columns in place of idnum ? Apr 26 '19 at 10:01
  • @jeganathanvelu better to ask as a separate question.
    – Arun
    May 6 '19 at 0:04
23

Using dplyr :

test %>%
    group_by(idnum) %>%
    summarize(start=min(start),end=max(end)) %>%
    do(data.frame(idnum=.$idnum, month=seq(.$start,.$end,by="1 month")))

Note that here I don't generate a sequence between start and end for each row, instead it is a sequence between min(start) and max(end) for each idnum. If you want the former :

test %>%
    rowwise() %>%
    do(data.frame(idnum=.$idnum, month=seq(.$start,.$end,by="1 month")))
0
7

Updated2

With new versions of purrr (0.3.0) and dplyr (0.8.0), this can be done with map2

library(dplyr)
library(purrr)
 test %>%
     # sequence of monthly dates for each corresponding start, end elements
     transmute(idnum, month = map2(start, end, seq, by = "1 month")) %>%
     # unnest the list column
     unnest %>% 
     # remove any duplicate rows
     distinct

Updated

Based on @Ananda Mahto's comments

 res1 <- melt(setNames(lapply(1:nrow(test), function(x) seq(test[x, "start"],
 test[x, "end"], by = "1 month")), test$idnum))

Also,

  res2 <- setNames(do.call(`rbind`,
          with(test, 
          Map(`expand.grid`,idnum,
          Map(`seq`, start, end, by='1 month')))), c("idnum", "month"))


  head(res1)
 #  idnum      month
 #1    17 1993-01-01
 #2    17 1993-02-01
 #3    17 1993-03-01
 #4    17 1993-04-01
 #5    17 1993-05-01
 #6    17 1993-06-01
5
  • +1. I had done melt(setNames(lapply(1:nrow(test), function(x) seq(test[x, "start"], test[x, "end"], by = "1 month")), test$idnum)) to avoid calling data.frame unnecessarily. Jul 17 '14 at 13:49
  • If all these methods work with my R version, how do I chose one? I am a complete beginner here... are some of these methods better generalizable to similar solutions, or newer and less likely to be deprecated? Is there a performance routine I could use to check them?
    – FooBar
    Jul 17 '14 at 13:53
  • @Ananda Mahto. Thanks I replaced my code with yours.
    – akrun
    Jul 17 '14 at 16:39
  • @FooBar, part personal preference, part "what code will I be able to understand 6 months from now?", part "how big is my data?" There are a lot of different reasons to pick one approach over the other. The "microbenchmark" package helps you figure out which approaches are most efficient in terms of computing time. Jul 17 '14 at 16:41
  • @FooBar, For me, if the datasets are considerably big, in general, dplyr or data.table based solutions would be faster. It is difficult to predict which one to be deprecated.
    – akrun
    Jul 17 '14 at 17:05
4

tidyverse answer

Data

df <- structure(list(idnum = c(17L, 17L, 17L), start = structure(c(8401, 
8401, 8401), class = "Date"), end = structure(c(8765, 8765, 8765
), class = "Date")), class = "data.frame", .Names = c("idnum", 
"start", "end"), row.names = c(NA, -3L))

Answer and output

library(tidyverse)
df %>%
  nest(start, end) %>%
  mutate(data = map(data, ~seq(unique(.x$start), unique(.x$end), 1))) %>%
  unnest(data)

# # A tibble: 365 x 2
   # idnum       data
   # <int>     <date>
 # 1    17 1993-01-01
 # 2    17 1993-01-02
 # 3    17 1993-01-03
 # 4    17 1993-01-04
 # 5    17 1993-01-05
 # 6    17 1993-01-06
 # 7    17 1993-01-07
 # 8    17 1993-01-08
 # 9    17 1993-01-09
# 10    17 1993-01-10
# # ... with 355 more rows
1
  • dplyr ver 0.7.4 gives Error: Each column must either be a list of vectors or a list of data frames [data]
    – Hedgehog
    Jun 25 '18 at 23:31
4

One option creating a sequence per every row using dplyr and tidyr could be:

df %>%
 rowwise() %>%
 transmute(idnum,
           date = list(seq(start, end, by = "month"))) %>%
 unnest(date)

  idnum date      
   <int> <date>    
 1    17 1993-01-01
 2    17 1993-02-01
 3    17 1993-03-01
 4    17 1993-04-01
 5    17 1993-05-01
 6    17 1993-06-01
 7    17 1993-07-01
 8    17 1993-08-01
 9    17 1993-09-01
10    17 1993-10-01
# … with 26 more rows

Or creating the sequence using a grouping ID:

df %>%
 group_by(idnum) %>%
 transmute(date = list(seq(min(start), max(end), by = "month"))) %>%
 unnest(date)

Or when the goal is to create only one unique sequence per ID:

df %>%
 group_by(idnum) %>%
 summarise(start = min(start),
           end = max(end)) %>%
 transmute(date = list(seq(min(start), max(end), by = "month"))) %>%
 unnest(date)

   date      
   <date>    
 1 1993-01-01
 2 1993-02-01
 3 1993-03-01
 4 1993-04-01
 5 1993-05-01
 6 1993-06-01
 7 1993-07-01
 8 1993-08-01
 9 1993-09-01
10 1993-10-01
11 1993-11-01
12 1993-12-01

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