80

I have a control with two properties. One is a DependencyProperty, the other is an "alias" to the first one. How do I raise the PropertyChanged event for the second one (the alias) when the first one is changed.

NOTE: I'm using DependencyObjects, not INotifyPropertyChanged (tried that, didn't work because my control is a ListVie sub-classed)

Something like this.....

protected override void OnPropertyChanged(DependencyPropertyChangedEventArgs e)
{
    base.OnPropertyChanged(e);
    if (e.Property == MyFirstProperty)
    {
        RaiseAnEvent( MySecondProperty ); /// what is the code that would go here?
    }    
}

If I were using an INotify I could do like this...

public string SecondProperty
{
    get
    {
        return this.m_IconPath;
    }
}

public string IconPath
{
    get
    {
        return this.m_IconPath;
    }
    set
    {
        if (this.m_IconPath != value)
        {
            this.m_IconPath = value;
        this.SendPropertyChanged("IconPath");
        this.SendPropertyChanged("SecondProperty");
        }
    }
}

Where can I raise PropertyChanged events on multiple properties from one setter? I need to be able to do the same thing, only using DependencyProperties.

2
  • If you're not using INotifyPropertyChanged, then there is no PropertyChanged event to raise (unless you're talking about a custom event?). Also, I wasn't sure whether the "alias" property is a DP or a plain CLR property -- could you clarify? Thanks!
    – itowlson
    Mar 19, 2010 at 20:36
  • the "alias" is not a DP, but I want it to act like one. so that when the first property is changed my UI will be notified that the other one has changed.
    – Muad'Dib
    Mar 19, 2010 at 21:22

6 Answers 6

81

I ran into a similar problem where I have a dependency property that I wanted the class to listen to change events to grab related data from a service.

public static readonly DependencyProperty CustomerProperty = 
    DependencyProperty.Register("Customer", typeof(Customer),
        typeof(CustomerDetailView),
        new PropertyMetadata(OnCustomerChangedCallBack));

public Customer Customer {
    get { return (Customer)GetValue(CustomerProperty); }
    set { SetValue(CustomerProperty, value); }
}

private static void OnCustomerChangedCallBack(
        DependencyObject sender, DependencyPropertyChangedEventArgs e)
{
    CustomerDetailView c = sender as CustomerDetailView;
    if (c != null) {
        c.OnCustomerChanged();
    }
}

protected virtual void OnCustomerChanged() {
    // Grab related data.
    // Raises INotifyPropertyChanged.PropertyChanged
    OnPropertyChanged("Customer");
}
5
  • 2
    I know I'm late to the party, but this answer solved my doubts like a charm, thank you! Jul 18, 2014 at 8:24
  • 1
    Couple months late - but this worked like a charm. I've been trying to crack this for a while now. Thanks!
    – imdandman
    Apr 9, 2015 at 14:31
  • 3
    This seems more appropriate than the accepted answer.
    – IAbstract
    Sep 2, 2016 at 18:57
  • 1
    This works to allow a Label to have an IsSelected property (like TreeViewItem behavior) to change the background color. Perfect.
    – IAbstract
    Sep 2, 2016 at 19:01
  • 1
    I know I'm way late, but I just came across this when googling ist, others might as well. I like this approach, but you can inline the Callback the reduce overhead like this: new PropertyMetadata((o,e) => (o as Customer)?.OnCustomerChanged())); Jun 15, 2021 at 19:32
49
  1. Implement INotifyPropertyChanged in your class.

  2. Specify a callback in the property metadata when you register the dependency property.

  3. In the callback, raise the PropertyChanged event.

Adding the callback:

public static DependencyProperty FirstProperty = DependencyProperty.Register(
  "First", 
  typeof(string), 
  typeof(MyType),
  new FrameworkPropertyMetadata(
     false, 
     new PropertyChangedCallback(OnFirstPropertyChanged)));

Raising PropertyChanged in the callback:

private static void OnFirstPropertyChanged(
   DependencyObject sender, DependencyPropertyChangedEventArgs e)
{
   PropertyChangedEventHandler h = PropertyChanged;
   if (h != null)
   {
      h(sender, new PropertyChangedEventArgs("Second"));
   }
}
7
  • first is already a dp, inherited from my base class (ListView) and im catching the property change in OnPropertyChanged. I will try this, and see what we get.
    – Muad'Dib
    Mar 20, 2010 at 8:35
  • 35
    How are you obtaining a reference to the PropertyChanged event from within the static method? You would first need to cast to INotifyPropertyChanged and access the event there.
    – Brett Ryan
    Jun 22, 2011 at 3:54
  • 8
    Your answer does not work since you are trying to access a non-static member through a static method. You should edit your answer as @BrettRyan states.
    – kkyr
    Oct 29, 2015 at 9:44
  • 1
    How can you call propertychanged in static method? May 8, 2018 at 8:52
  • 2
    this doesn't seem to work. It appears that if an object is a DependencyObject, the WPF engine ignores INotifyPropertyChanged and doesn't subscribe to its event. Mar 12, 2019 at 22:21
11

I think the OP is asking the wrong question. The code below will show that it not necessary to manually raise the PropertyChanged EVENT from a dependency property to achieve the desired result. The way to do it is handle the PropertyChanged CALLBACK on the dependency property and set values for other dependency properties there. The following is a working example. In the code below, MyControl has two dependency properties - ActiveTabInt and ActiveTabString. When the user clicks the button on the host (MainWindow), ActiveTabString is modified. The PropertyChanged CALLBACK on the dependency property sets the value of ActiveTabInt. The PropertyChanged EVENT is not manually raised by MyControl.

MainWindow.xaml.cs

/// <summary>
/// Interaction logic for MainWindow.xaml
/// </summary>
public partial class MainWindow : Window, INotifyPropertyChanged
{
    public MainWindow()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
        DataContext = this;
        ActiveTabString = "zero";
    }

    private string _ActiveTabString;
    public string ActiveTabString
    {
        get { return _ActiveTabString; }
        set
        {
            if (_ActiveTabString != value)
            {
                _ActiveTabString = value;
                RaisePropertyChanged("ActiveTabString");
            }
        }
    }

    private int _ActiveTabInt;
    public int ActiveTabInt
    {
        get { return _ActiveTabInt; }
        set
        {
            if (_ActiveTabInt != value)
            {
                _ActiveTabInt = value;
                RaisePropertyChanged("ActiveTabInt");
            }
        }
    }

    #region INotifyPropertyChanged implementation
    public event PropertyChangedEventHandler PropertyChanged;

    public void RaisePropertyChanged(string propertyName)
    {
        if (PropertyChanged != null)
            PropertyChanged(this, new PropertyChangedEventArgs(propertyName));
    }
    #endregion

    private void Button_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
    {
        ActiveTabString = (ActiveTabString == "zero") ? "one" : "zero";
    }

}

public class MyControl : Control
{
    public static List<string> Indexmap = new List<string>(new string[] { "zero", "one" });


    public string ActiveTabString
    {
        get { return (string)GetValue(ActiveTabStringProperty); }
        set { SetValue(ActiveTabStringProperty, value); }
    }

    public static readonly DependencyProperty ActiveTabStringProperty = DependencyProperty.Register(
        "ActiveTabString",
        typeof(string),
        typeof(MyControl), new FrameworkPropertyMetadata(
            null,
            FrameworkPropertyMetadataOptions.BindsTwoWayByDefault,
            ActiveTabStringChanged));


    public int ActiveTabInt
    {
        get { return (int)GetValue(ActiveTabIntProperty); }
        set { SetValue(ActiveTabIntProperty, value); }
    }
    public static readonly DependencyProperty ActiveTabIntProperty = DependencyProperty.Register(
        "ActiveTabInt",
        typeof(Int32),
        typeof(MyControl), new FrameworkPropertyMetadata(
            new Int32(),
            FrameworkPropertyMetadataOptions.BindsTwoWayByDefault));


    static MyControl()
    {
        DefaultStyleKeyProperty.OverrideMetadata(typeof(MyControl), new FrameworkPropertyMetadata(typeof(MyControl)));

    }

    public override void OnApplyTemplate()
    {
        base.OnApplyTemplate();
    }


    private static void ActiveTabStringChanged(DependencyObject sender, DependencyPropertyChangedEventArgs e)
    {
        MyControl thiscontrol = sender as MyControl;

        if (Indexmap[thiscontrol.ActiveTabInt] != thiscontrol.ActiveTabString)
            thiscontrol.ActiveTabInt = Indexmap.IndexOf(e.NewValue.ToString());

    }
}

MainWindow.xaml

    <StackPanel Orientation="Vertical">
    <Button Content="Change Tab Index" Click="Button_Click" Width="110" Height="30"></Button>
    <local:MyControl x:Name="myControl" ActiveTabInt="{Binding ActiveTabInt, Mode=TwoWay}" ActiveTabString="{Binding ActiveTabString}"></local:MyControl>
</StackPanel>

App.xaml

<Style TargetType="local:MyControl">
        <Setter Property="Template">
            <Setter.Value>
                <ControlTemplate TargetType="local:MyControl">
                    <TabControl SelectedIndex="{Binding ActiveTabInt, Mode=TwoWay}">
                        <TabItem Header="Tab Zero">
                            <TextBlock Text="{Binding ActiveTabInt}"></TextBlock>
                        </TabItem>
                        <TabItem Header="Tab One">
                            <TextBlock Text="{Binding ActiveTabInt}"></TextBlock>
                        </TabItem>
                    </TabControl>
                </ControlTemplate>
            </Setter.Value>
        </Setter>
    </Style>
1
  • I had a quirk with this, I could not find RaisePropertyChanged( but instead had to use RaisePropertyChangedEventImmediately(
    – Solx
    Jun 21, 2016 at 18:16
6

I agree with Sam and Xaser and have actually taken this a bit farther. I don't think you should be implementing the INotifyPropertyChanged interface in a UserControl at all...the control is already a DependencyObject and therefore already comes with notifications. Adding INotifyPropertyChanged to a DependencyObject is redundant and "smells" wrong to me.

What I did is implement both properties as DependencyProperties, as Sam suggests, but then simply had the PropertyChangedCallback from the "first" dependency property alter the value of the "second" dependency property. Since both are dependency properties, both will automatically raise change notifications to any interested subscribers (e.g. data binding etc.)

In this case, dependency property A is the string InviteText, which triggers a change in dependency property B, the Visibility property named ShowInvite. This would be a common use case if you have some text that you want to be able to hide completely in a control via data binding.

public string InviteText  
{
    get { return (string)GetValue(InviteTextProperty); }
    set { SetValue(InviteTextProperty, value); }
}

public static readonly DependencyProperty InviteTextProperty =
    DependencyProperty.Register("InviteText", typeof(string), typeof(InvitePrompt), new UIPropertyMetadata(String.Empty, OnInviteTextChanged));

private static void OnInviteTextChanged(DependencyObject d, DependencyPropertyChangedEventArgs e)
{
    InvitePrompt prompt = d as InvitePrompt;
    if (prompt != null)
    {
        string text = e.NewValue as String;
        prompt.ShowInvite = String.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(text) ? Visibility.Collapsed : Visibility.Visible;
    }
}

public Visibility ShowInvite
{
    get { return (Visibility)GetValue(ShowInviteProperty); }
    set { SetValue(ShowInviteProperty, value); }
}

public static readonly DependencyProperty ShowInviteProperty =
    DependencyProperty.Register("ShowInvite", typeof(Visibility), typeof(InvitePrompt), new PropertyMetadata(Visibility.Collapsed));

Note I'm not including the UserControl signature or constructor here because there is nothing special about them; they don't need to subclass from INotifyPropertyChanged at all.

1
  • 1
    I agree with you that it doesn't make sense to use INPC. Your example behaves differently than the OP's example though. Yours creates duplicate data that can become out of sync: ShowInvite is publicly changeable, but doesn't update InviteText. OP's SecondProperty is read-only. ShowInvite should be a read-only DependencyProperty. Sep 20, 2017 at 14:07
1

Building upon the previous accepted answer, for me the cast was missing to get access to the non-static PropertyChanged:

  1. Implement INotifyPropertyChanged in your class, e.g. UserControl CustomView

  2. Specify a callback in the property metadata when you register the dependency property.

  3. In the callback, cast and raise the PropertyChanged event.

Adding the callback:

public static DependencyProperty FirstProperty = DependencyProperty.Register(
  "First", 
  typeof(string), 
  typeof(MyType),
  new FrameworkPropertyMetadata(
     false, 
     new PropertyChangedCallback(OnFirstPropertyChanged)));

Cast the sender and raise PropertyChanged in the callback:

private static void OnFirstPropertyChanged(
   DependencyObject sender, DependencyPropertyChangedEventArgs e)
{
   var control = (CustomView)sender;
   PropertyChangedEventHandler h = control.PropertyChanged;
   if (h != null)
   {
      h(sender, new PropertyChangedEventArgs("Second"));
   }
}
0

I question the logic of raising a PropertyChanged event on the second property when it's the first property that's changing. If the second properties value changes then the PropertyChanged event could be raised there.

At any rate, the answer to your question is you should implement INotifyPropertyChange. This interface contains the PropertyChanged event. Implementing INotifyPropertyChanged lets other code know that the class has the PropertyChanged event, so that code can hook up a handler. After implementing INotifyPropertyChange, the code that goes in the if statement of your OnPropertyChanged is:

if (PropertyChanged != null)
    PropertyChanged(new PropertyChangedEventArgs("MySecondProperty"));
1
  • I am deriving from the ListView control. I can add INotify, and, in fact, i tried that. no dice, when i tried to raise the event, nothing happened. the property i want to "alais" is a dependency property.
    – Muad'Dib
    Mar 20, 2010 at 7:25

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