12

I can't figure out how to create a knockout click binding that doesn't execute the valueAccessor unless a javascript confirm dialog returns true.

It's probably look something like this:

<a data-bind="confirmClick: { message: 'Are you sure?', click: someMethod }">Confirmable link</a>

Internally, the confirmClick binding would do something like:

if (confirm(message)) {
   click();
}

I know I could get around having to do this by putting the confirm(...) code in my viewModel, but that doesn't seem like the appropriate place to put that kind of code. I could probably also go as far as to do this kind of confirm dialog with jQueryUI or Bootstrap, but I want something I can just drop into any project.

I've scoured the internets with no luck.. I even looked at the source code for knockout's click event (https://github.com/knockout/knockout/blob/master/src/binding/defaultBindings/event.js), but it doesn't look friendly at all...

Any help at all would be greatly appreciated!

20

You need to create your custom confirmClick binding handler which takes your message and your click handler and wrap around the confirmation logic:

ko.bindingHandlers.confirmClick = {
    init: function(element, valueAccessor, allBindings, viewModel) {
        var value = valueAccessor();
        var message = ko.unwrap(value.message);
        var click = value.click;
        ko.applyBindingsToNode(element, { click: function () {
            if (confirm(message))
                return click.apply(this, Array.prototype.slice.apply(arguments));
        }}, viewModel);
    }
}

And you can you it like you have described:

<a data-bind="confirmClick: { message: 'Are you sure?', click: someMethod }">
    Confirmable link</a>

Demo JSFiddle.

Note: You only need the click.apply magic if you want to preserve and pass over the original click event handler args to your own click event handler.

  • Just to finalize things.... what should the anonymous click:function() { ....} return if confirm returns false? – Alex Dresko Jul 17 '14 at 14:42
  • it will return undefined so KO won't call your handler also the browser action (clicking on the link) won't be executed. But you can change this according to your needs. – nemesv Jul 17 '14 at 14:43
  • Already tested this before the other answer came in and it works incredibly well. I'm glad I spent the time investigating how to do it on my own, but I didn't get anywhere close to this level of enlightenment. Thanks! – Alex Dresko Jul 17 '14 at 14:45
  • 2
    Good answer, small bug in your code. The third parameter of init is allBindings not viewModel. Your JSFiddle works because you do not use the vm parameter in your final method. – Michael Mar 3 '16 at 9:10
  • If you need to use the viewModel in your click event, you can pass it to the click.apply function. Like so: jsfiddle.net/L2Lrjdba/17 – Onosa Mar 5 '18 at 20:35
0

I believe this is where Knockout defines the click binding handler -

ko.bindingHandlers[eventName] = {
    'init': function(element, valueAccessor, allBindings, viewModel, bindingContext) {
        var newValueAccessor = function () {
            var result = {};
            result[eventName] = valueAccessor();
            return result;
        };
        return ko.bindingHandlers['event']['init'].call(this, element, newValueAccessor, allBindings, viewModel, bindingContext);
    }
}

Where eventName is 'click' for that binding handler. I believe that putting this somewhere in your view model or after Knockout is loaded should do the trick -

ko.bindingHandlers.clickConfirm = {
    'init': function(element, valueAccessor, allBindings, viewModel, bindingContext) {
        var newValueAccessor = function () {
            var result = {};
            result.click = function () {
             var result = confirm('You are about to confirm something.');
                // If they press OK,
                console.log('pressed - ', result);
                if (result === true) {
                    console.log('Calling this - ', valueAccessor());
                    valueAccessor()();
                }

            }
            return result;
        };
        return ko.bindingHandlers['event']['init'].call(this, element, newValueAccessor, allBindings, viewModel, bindingContext);
    }
}

http://jsfiddle.net/XhLKD/

  • Kudos on the working solution, but @nemesv's answer came in first, works, and at least appears to be a slightly simpler solution. I should point out that there are things happening in both of your solutions that are outside my understanding, so, from a technical perspective, your answer might very well be better. Ultimately, I picked the first, and shorter answer based on my ignorance. – Alex Dresko Jul 17 '14 at 14:47

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