1

I have a class so defined:

class User {

    var name : String?
}

I use it in my ViewController using the code:

import UIKit

class ViewController: UIViewController {

    let user : User = User()
}

I have the compilation error

User is not constructible with ()

I know that the properties in Swift must have a default, but the optional has one (nil). The error disappear if I initialize the property "name" to nil or add an init() initializer. But I don't understand why my optional has not nil by default.

By the way, the following code in playground compiles perfectly:

class ViewController: UIViewController {

    let user : User = User()
}

class User {

    var name : String?
}
let vc = ViewController()

And it is strange.

This question is related to this but I don't understand the answer there (why the optional has default in the playground but not in the app?).

EDIT: The error happens only if the User class is defined in a separated file. XCode is Beta 3 (see images)

XCode Versione

User class file

view controller file

  • that error does not appear on my side. I've compiled the project with no further issues. – holex Jul 17 '14 at 15:11
  • Have you tried the project as the screenshots in my edit? – valfer Jul 19 '14 at 16:04
  • Bug is also in current XCode 6.0 GM (6A313), Swift version 1.0 :-( – valfer Sep 15 '14 at 16:24
0

You should file a bug report -- this is definitely incorrect behavior by the compiler. When you try to initialize that way you're using the default initializer -- Apple's documentation states:

Swift provides a default initializer for any structure or base class that provides default values for all of its properties and does not provide at least one initializer itself. The default initializer simply creates a new instance with all of its properties set to their default values.

Then shows this example:

class ShoppingListItem {
    var name: String?
    var quantity = 1
    var purchased = false
}
var item = ShoppingListItem()

Then says in the following paragraph:

... (The name property is an optional String property, and so it automatically receives a default value of nil, even though this value is not written in the code.) ...

  • Thank you, my opinion also is that it is a bug of the current beta – valfer Jul 19 '14 at 16:05
0

I tried your code in an iOS app using Xcode 6 beta 3 and it just compiles and runs fine.

The code is the same:

class User {
    var name : String?
}

class ViewController: UIViewController {
    let user : User = User()

    override func viewDidLoad() {
        super.viewDidLoad()
    }
}

and if I set a breakpoint on this line:

let user : User = User()

it stops as expected.

Are you using beta 3? Have you double checked your code to be sure that it's actually what you've posted here?

  • Yes, I'm using Beta 3. I think your code works as expected because the two classes are in the same source file. See my Edit. – valfer Jul 19 '14 at 16:03
  • I tried the code from github, and indeed it doesn't compile The only way is to explicitly add an empty initializer or initializing the variable to nil. Definitely a bug in my opinion. – Antonio Jul 29 '14 at 14:45
0

If you want it to compile you write your user class like this, might not be ideal, but seems to work in github.com/valfer/OptionalBug

class User {

    var name : String?

    init() {

    }
}
  • or: class User { var name : String? = nil } – valfer Jul 23 '14 at 22:43

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