207

I cannot figure out how to initialize a nested struct. Find an example here: http://play.golang.org/p/NL6VXdHrjh

package main

type Configuration struct {
    Val   string
    Proxy struct {
        Address string
        Port    string
    }
}

func main() {

    c := &Configuration{
        Val: "test",
        Proxy: {
            Address: "addr",
            Port:    "80",
        }
    }

}
1
  • 2
    Just learning go and had exactly the same question. You can omit element types for arrays and maps but not for nested structs. Illogical and inconvenient. Can someone explain why? Mar 24, 2018 at 6:16

10 Answers 10

261

Well, any specific reason to not make Proxy its own struct?

Anyway you have 2 options:

The proper way, simply move proxy to its own struct, for example:

type Configuration struct {
    Val string
    Proxy Proxy
}

type Proxy struct {
    Address string
    Port    string
}

func main() {

    c := &Configuration{
        Val: "test",
        Proxy: Proxy{
            Address: "addr",
            Port:    "port",
        },
    }
    fmt.Println(c)
    fmt.Println(c.Proxy.Address)
}

The less proper and ugly way but still works:

c := &Configuration{
    Val: "test",
    Proxy: struct {
        Address string
        Port    string
    }{
        Address: "addr",
        Port:    "80",
    },
}
8
  • 7
    In the second method, can we avoid the repetitive struct definition? Jan 30, 2017 at 6:46
  • 1
    @GauravOjha not all the way, but something like play.golang.org/p/n24BD3NlIR
    – OneOfOne
    Jan 30, 2017 at 15:07
  • 1
    as pointed out below by @sepehr you can access the variables directly using the dot notation.
    – snassr
    Jan 19, 2018 at 18:32
  • 2
    What if the proxy has a field with struct as type? How to initialize them inside another nested struct? Dec 20, 2019 at 10:50
  • 2
    The first proposal leads to name space collisions. Instead of "Proxy" you have to use "ConfigurationProxy" to avoid collisions. And if you do it correctly, you will notice that this gets more annoying with every nesting level.
    – ceving
    Mar 3, 2023 at 11:54
177

If you don't want to go with separate struct definition for nested struct and you don't like second method suggested by @OneOfOne you can use this third method:

package main
import "fmt"
type Configuration struct {
    Val   string
    Proxy struct {
        Address string
        Port    string
    }
}

func main() {
    c := &Configuration{
        Val: "test",
    }

    c.Proxy.Address = `127.0.0.1`
    c.Proxy.Port = `8080`
}

You can check it here: https://play.golang.org/p/WoSYCxzCF2

8
  • 28
    Wow, an actual answer to the question of how to initialize nested structs.
    – Max
    Nov 17, 2016 at 16:46
  • 1
    This is actually pretty good, but would've been better if we could do it in one line! Jan 30, 2017 at 6:47
  • 1
    I was looking for a way where you wouldn't need to do c.Proxy.Address = `127.0.0.1` c.Proxy.Port = `8080` Is there a way to initialize those values during &Configuration{} assignment? May 23, 2017 at 18:18
  • 1
    @MatheusFelipe you can but then you have to define Proxy as its own struct, see first method in the answer by @OneOfOne
    – sepehr
    May 24, 2017 at 2:30
  • 1
    What when Proxy is an array, Proxy []struct{} ?
    – Ishmeet
    Sep 27, 2021 at 12:52
18

Define your Proxy struct separately, outside of Configuration, like this:

type Proxy struct {
    Address string
    Port    string
}

type Configuration struct {
    Val string
    P   Proxy
}

c := &Configuration{
    Val: "test",
    P: Proxy{
        Address: "addr",
        Port:    "80",
    },
}

See http://play.golang.org/p/7PELCVsQIc

1
13

You have this option also:

type Configuration struct {
        Val string
        Proxy
}

type Proxy struct {
        Address string
        Port    string
}

func main() {
        c := &Configuration{"test", Proxy{"addr", "port"}}
        fmt.Println(c)
}
3
  • Yes or the same with the second type of initializers field:value Feb 27, 2018 at 14:52
  • 1
    What if Proxy is an array? Jun 23, 2020 at 9:27
  • @ErtuğrulAltınboğa in this case you can do an append(pxyArr, Proxy{"addr", "port"})
    – Shadoweb
    Jul 27, 2021 at 16:51
12

You also could allocate using new and initialize all fields by hand

package main

type Configuration struct {
    Val   string
    Proxy struct {
        Address string
        Port    string
    }
}

func main() {
    c := new(Configuration)
    c.Val = "test"
    c.Proxy.Address = "addr"
    c.Proxy.Port = "80"
}

See in playground: https://play.golang.org/p/sFH_-HawO_M

2
  • Great example +1. For clarity you could add fmt.Println(c.Val, c.Proxy.Address, c.Proxy.Port).
    – user12817546
    Sep 19, 2020 at 2:24
  • I'd like to add using new() only makes sense if you want a pointer. Otherwise just do var c Configuration.
    – Ferdy
    Sep 1, 2022 at 19:13
9

One gotcha arises when you want to instantiate a public type defined in an external package and that type embeds other types that are private.

Example:

package animals

type otherProps{
  Name string
  Width int
}

type Duck{
  Weight int
  otherProps
}

How do you instantiate a Duck in your own program? Here's the best I could come up with:

package main

import "github.com/someone/animals"

func main(){
  var duck animals.Duck
  // Can't instantiate a duck with something.Duck{Weight: 2, Name: "Henry"} because `Name` is part of the private type `otherProps`
  duck.Weight = 2
  duck.Width = 30
  duck.Name = "Henry"
}
1
  • For those how forgot like me, name your struct attributes with capital letters otherwise, you will face cannot refer to unexported field or method error.
    – tagaism
    Jun 17, 2020 at 17:45
8

You need to redefine the unnamed struct during &Configuration{}

package main

import "fmt"

type Configuration struct {
    Val   string
    Proxy struct {
        Address string
        Port    string
    }
}

func main() {

    c := &Configuration{
        Val: "test",
        Proxy: struct {
            Address string
            Port    string
        }{
            Address: "127.0.0.1",
            Port:    "8080",
        },
    }
    fmt.Println(c)
}

https://play.golang.org/p/Fv5QYylFGAY

2

You can define a struct and create its object in another struct like i have done below:

package main

import "fmt"

type Address struct {
    streetNumber int
    streetName   string
    zipCode      int
}

type Person struct {
    name    string
    age     int
    address Address
}

func main() {
    var p Person
    p.name = "Vipin"
    p.age = 30
    p.address = Address{
        streetName:   "Krishna Pura",
        streetNumber: 14,
        zipCode:      475110,
    }
    fmt.Println("Name: ", p.name)
    fmt.Println("Age: ", p.age)
    fmt.Println("StreetName: ", p.address.streetName)
    fmt.Println("StreeNumber: ", p.address.streetNumber)
}

Hope it helped you :)

1
package main

type    Proxy struct {
        Address string
        Port    string
    }

type Configuration struct {
    Proxy
    Val   string

}

func main() {

    c := &Configuration{
        Val: "test",
        Proxy: Proxy {
            Address: "addr",
            Port:    "80",
        },
    }

}
1

When your configuration is something global, you can do it this way:

package main

var Configuration struct {
    Val   string
    Proxy struct {
        Address string
        Port    string
    }
}

func main() {
    Configuration.Val = "test"
    Configuration.Proxy.Address = "addr"
    Configuration.Proxy.Port = "80"
}
0

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