So I have four conditions that I need to go through and I thought it would be best to use the switch statement in PHP. However, I need to check whether an integer is, let's say, less than or equal, or greater than and equal.

switch ($count) {
    case 20:
        $priority = 'low';
        break;

    case 40:
        $priority = 'medium';
        break;

    case 60:
        $priority = 'high';
        break;

    case 80:
        $priority = 'severe';
        break;
}

With an if() statement it would look like the following:

if ($count <= 20) {
    $priority = 'low';
}

if ($count <= 40) {
    $priority = 'medium';
}

Is that possible in switch-case?

  • 7
    Well you can switch(true) and return true on the cases that satisfy the range Example. If this was on a smaller scale, you could just repeat the numbers in range, and have them flow into each other Example. But yeah for your example, you should use an if statement. – David Chen Jul 17 '14 at 20:26
  • 3
    stick with your if – user557846 Jul 17 '14 at 20:28
  • @DaveChen Thats a nice trick. – Havenard Jul 17 '14 at 20:41
  • According to this apparently you can -- search for (randomizer) -- php.net/manual/en/control-structures.switch.php – Tasos Jul 17 '14 at 20:43
up vote 82 down vote accepted

A more general case for solving this problem is:

switch (true) {
    case $count <= 20:
        $priority = 'low';
        break;

    case $count <= 40:
        $priority = 'medium';
        break;

    case $count <= 60:
        $priority = 'high';
        break;

    default:
        $priority = 'severe';
        break;
}

Switches can't do that, but in this particular case you can do something like this:

switch ((int)(($count - 1) / 20)) {
    case 0:
        $priority = 'low';
        break;
    case 1:
        $priority = 'medium';
        break;
    case 2:
        $priority = 'high';
        break;
    case 3:
        $priority = 'severe';
        break;
}

So in (int)(($count - 1) / 20) all values from 0 to 20 will eval to 0, 21 to 40 will eval to 1 and so on, allowing you to use the switch statement for this purpose.

And since we are concatenating values, we can even simplify to an array:

$priorities = ['low', 'medium', 'high', 'severe'];
$priority = $priorities[(int)(($count - 1) / 20)];

There is a way that works in php 7 using ternary assignment operators. The operator was introduced earlier on (5.4?) but I never tested the code on other versions. I wrote the whole switch code there, however for brevity here is just the specific clause. Let's say we want the condition to match for all numbers greater than or equal to five :

switch($value){
 case ($value >= 5?$value:!$value)://do something here
 break;
}     

We either allow the $value to pass unchanged or we negate the value according to the condition. A $value will always match itself or fail the test against its negation.

  • Can confirm that this approach works back to atleast php 5.5 – Ole Haugset Feb 20 at 12:11

No. switch() statements are for doing multiple equality tests. They're basically just a slightly easier to read (but also more hazardous) version of

if (x == 'a') { ... }
else if (x == 'b') { ... } 
else if (x == 'c') { ... }

code. There is no way to change a switch() away from == to < or any other comparison operator. It's strictly for equality testing.

  • what is wrong with @Konr Ness solution? – Leandro Tupone Feb 23 at 16:38

I can also confirm @bytepunk answer here is functional.

Also, expending the concept with PHP 7

switch ($interval->days)
{
    case 0:
        return '1 day';
        // break;
    case (($interval->days >= 1 && $interval->days <= 7) ?? $interval->days):
        return '1 week';
        // break;
    case (($interval->days >= 8 && $interval->days <= 31) ?? $interval->days):
        return '1 month';
        // break;
    case (($interval->days >= 31 && $interval->days <= 93) ?? $interval->days):
        return '2-3 months';
        // break;
    default:
        return '3+ months';
}

I will admit that this isn't the cleanest of code, so perhaps wrapping each case with a static-like pure function would neat things up a bit, and not forgetting to name each function (or create one generic function with parameters) to match the case. This will make it more readable.

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