33

I'm coming from a Java background where when you declare the inner class, it's either static, and doesn't have access to the instance of the outer class, or it's not static, and can access the instance of the outer class that's being operated on. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inner_class#Types_of_nested_classes_in_Java

Does Swift have any concept of this? From my testing, I cannot seem to get access to the Outer's self object, but I definitely could be doing something wrong.

class Outer {
    let value = ""
    class Inner {
        func foo() {
            let bar = value // 'Outer.Type' does not have a member named 'value'
        }
    }
}
34

AFAIK, you can't access the outer class out-of-the-box.

But what you can do is:

class Outer {

    let value = ""
    var inner = Inner()

    class Inner {

        weak var parent: Outer! = nil

        func foo() {
            let bar = parent.value
        }

    }

    init() {
        inner.parent = self
    }

}

Or:

class Outer {

    class Inner {

        unowned let parent: Outer

        init(parent: Outer) {
            self.parent = parent
        }

    }

    let value = ""
    var inner: Inner! = nil

    init() {
        inner = Inner(parent: self)
    }

}
  • 1
    Your solution limits you to a single instance of the Inner class per Outer. I don't think this is desired in general, but would be fine in certain circumstances. If you set the reference in Inner's constructor you'd get around this. – Sky Nov 27 '14 at 2:30
  • I've marked this as the solution, since I think this the closest we can get with Swift right now (assuming you setup the ref inside inner's init instead). However, I think an alternative way to look at this problem is that Swift doesn't support inner classes accessing the outer class's scope. Your solution is basically achieving this by doing all the work manually. This approach reminds me of attempts to create instanced methods through using static functions that take a reference to this/self as their first argument. – Sky Dec 11 '14 at 18:25
  • Wny would you not declare the outer class (in Inner) as unowned - such as: unowned var parent: Outer – inder Jan 23 '15 at 20:34
  • @inder: it simply would not work with unowned. Swift returns compile-error. Do you have a snippet that illustrates what you mean? – Anton Bronnikov Jan 27 '15 at 18:24
  • 1
    @inder unowned and var do not go together. If you change to unowned you must also change to use let. This forces you to use a constructor for Inner (which is good, see my first comment). The code would look like: class Outer { let value = "" func baz() { var inner = Inner(parent: self) } class Inner { unowned let parent: Outer init(parent: Outer) { self.parent = parent } func foo() { let bar = parent.value } } } – Sky Jan 30 '15 at 18:48
3

Nested types don't have any special access to the types that contain them. But I don't think that's all that's going on here. You seem to be a little fuzzy on classes versus instances.

value is a property of the Outer class. That means each instance of Outer has its own value. Inner is a separate class that exists in the namespace of Outer. So when you write let bar = value, there is no such thing as value to access, because that only exists in instances of Outer, and we don't have any instances at hand. If it were a class property, you could do let bar = Outer.value.

  • 1
    Hmm, so if Swift is using the 'class' keyword to mean static for properties/functions, then in a way we're forced to declare our inner classes static when we use the 'class' keyword to define them. – Sky Jul 18 '14 at 1:05
  • @Sky: I don't think so, because that class is not a property or a function. It's just the normal class keyword that begins a class definition. – Chuck Jul 18 '14 at 1:23
  • 17
    "You seem to be a little fuzzy on classes versus instances." I don't think so, because in Java, you would be able to access instance variable value of the Outer class from an instance of the inner class. – newacct Jul 18 '14 at 4:40
2

Inner classes in any language are a pretty much useless construct. They do nothing for separation of concerns. They only provide a visual grouping of internals of the wrapper class, but the code remains highly entangled with cross-dependencies all over the place.

The proper practice of abstraction is to isolate pieces which deal with as minimum a set of problems as possible (ideally, one). Isolation implies that there are no cross-dependencies possible, which makes a huge deal when it comes to reasoning about the code.

Ask yourself: what do you really need this reference to the outer class for? The only possible answer is to merely get access to some particular part of its API. Turns out, that is what makes specialising the inner class to the specific outer class a redundancy.

Consider the following example:

class CustomSectionContentController : UIViewController {

  @IBOutlet weak var webView: UIWebView!

  lazy var webViewDelegate: WebViewDelegate = WebViewDelegate()

  override func viewDidLoad() {
    super.viewDidLoad()
    webView.delegate = webViewDelegate
  }

  class WebViewDelegate: NSObject, UIWebViewDelegate {

    var overlay: ProgressOverlay?

    func webViewDidStartLoad(webView: UIWebView) {
      // Here I want to access the 'view' of the outer class:
      overlay = ProgressOverlay.cover(outerSelf.view)
    }

    func webViewDidFinishLoad(webView: UIWebView) {
      overlay?.remove()
    }

  }
}

While, of course, you can work around the missing outerSelf functionality with either of the multiple approaches suggested in the other answers, this example actually shows that there's an easily distinguishable piece of code, which could be isolated. Consider the following alternative:

class CustomSectionContentController : UIViewController {

  @IBOutlet weak var webView: UIWebView!

  lazy var webViewDelegate: ProgressOverlayWebViewDelegate =
    ProgressOverlayWebViewDelegate(view: self.view)

  override func viewDidLoad() {
    super.viewDidLoad()
    webView.delegate = webViewDelegate
  }

}

class ProgressOverlayWebViewDelegate: NSObject, UIWebViewDelegate {

  let view: UIView

  init(view: UIView) {
    self.view = view
  }

  var overlay: ProgressOverlay?

  func webViewDidStartLoad(webView: UIWebView) {
    overlay = ProgressOverlay.cover(view)
  }

  func webViewDidFinishLoad(webView: UIWebView) {
    overlay?.remove()
  }

}

See the difference? Our controller now doesn't deal with the problem area of a WebView delegate at all. We now also have an isolated general ProgressOverlayWebViewDelegate, which knows nothing about the controller which uses it. This means that we can reuse this delegate in other controllers.

You might not believe it at first, but it actually turns out that the above approach applies to all scenarios involving inner classes. Isolation of concerns is the cornerstone of good practices of abstraction and programming in general, so whenever you bump into this kind of a problem reconsider.

  • 1
    I think you're wrong at least in terms of inner classes as they exist in Swift. All inner classes do in Swift is namespace them to the enclosing type. They have no references to the enclosing type's data at all. For instance, if one were to create a linked list, one would probably make it's Node an inner class so that it doesn't clutter up the name space. – Michael Morris Apr 30 '18 at 0:56
2

No and to have similar feature in Swift you need to hard code it.

class Outer {
    var value = 0

    init(_ value: Int) {
        self.value = value
    }

    func inner() -> Inner {
        return Inner(self)
    }

    class Inner {
        let outer: Outer
        var value = 1

        init(_ outer: Outer) {
            self.outer = outer
        }

        func doSomething() {
            print("Outer ", outer.value, " Inner ", value)
        }
    }
}

let i1 = Outer(1).inner()
i1.doSomething() // Outer 1 Inner 1

let i2 = Outer(2).inner()
i2.doSomething() // Outer 2 Inner 1
1

You can work around the problem like this:

class Outer {
    let value = ""
    class Inner {
        func foo(outer: Outer) {
            let bar = outer.value
        }
    }
}

Or instead of passing the Outer instance to the foo method, you could pass it to an initializer for Inner. But that trick wouldn't work if Inner were an enum because a Swift enum can't have properties (other than associated values, which are like properties).

This workaround is the equivalent of what Java does implicitly for an inner class, to avoid burdening you with the busywork of passing an argument and explicitly referencing through it.

IMO the rationale for Java's inner class feature is similar to the rationale for closures: the feature allows code to implicitly use variables from the environment (in this case the environment is the Outer class instance). I don't know why Swift lacks inner classes. Lots of existing Swift code will have to be changed to put static in front of class declarations if Swift is enhanced to do inner classes. Worth it, IMO.

0

Well, you could use inheritance so that you use outer as superclass of inner.

class Outer {
    let value = ""
    class Inner: Outer {
        func foo() {
            let bar = value //value is now accessable as it has internal access from the superclass
        }
    }
}
  • 1
    By the way - you should use capitalized Class names ... – borchero Dec 10 '14 at 15:00
  • 1
    So why don't you start with it? :) – HAS Dec 10 '14 at 15:05
  • 1
    Well I copied the code from above and only realized when I finished my answer but ok I'll change it – borchero Dec 10 '14 at 15:20
  • 1
    I think this is my fault, my question doesn't explain why we want an inner class. Your solution does "solve" my stripped down code example, but it doesn't really allow us to have the mechanism we want. The inner class is supposed to be a tool for the outer class to use. See google.com/?#q=java+inner+class+use for more detailed explanations of what I was looking for. – Sky Dec 11 '14 at 18:22
  • Instance of such Inner class does not have access to Outer class instance. – mixel Jan 14 '17 at 0:00
0

If you have many inner classes and want to write less lines of code then you can create base class with initializer that accepts Outer instance and inherit all inner classes from it:

class Outer {
    func testInner() {
        print("test")
    }

    class InnerBase {
        let outer: Outer

        init(outer: Outer) {
            self.outer = outer
        }
    }

    class Inner1: InnerBase {
        func test() {
            outer.testInner()
        }
    }

    class Inner2: InnerBase {
        func test() {
            outer.testInner()
        }
    }

    func test() {
        Inner1(outer: self).test()
        Inner2(outer: self).test()
    }
}

Outer().test()
-3

That would be against the concept of OO programming. How could an instance of an inner class know to which instance of the outer class it belongs to? Classes are blue-prints, not actual objects in memory. Therefore, you may pass a reference of an instance of a outer class to the constructor/initialiser in the inner class to get a reference from the inner instance to the outer instance.

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