In C++14, generalized lambda capture let us do:

template<class T>
auto pack(T t)
{
    return [t=std::move(t)](auto&& f){f(t);};
};

But it doesn't play with param-pack:

template<class... T>
auto pack(T... t)
{
    return [t=std::move(t)...](auto&& f){f(t...);};
};

Is there any special syntax or further standard proposal to address this?

  • 1
    What problem are you having with capturing & and using f(std::move(t)...)? – chris Jul 18 '14 at 2:56
  • 1
    @chris The references would become dangling as soon as pack returns, no? – Brian Jul 18 '14 at 3:01
  • @Brian, Oh yeah, good point. I didn't notice it was being returned. – chris Jul 18 '14 at 3:02
  • 1
    It's intended to be used in replacement of tuple for callback, so I can't use reference which will become dangling. – Jamboree Jul 18 '14 at 3:04
up vote 18 down vote accepted

My draft of C++14 says ([expr.prim.lambda]/24):

A simple-capture followed by an ellipsis is a pack expansion (14.5.3). An init-capture followed by an ellipsis is ill-formed.

So it looks like there is no way to do a variadic generalized capture. A possible workaround is to just capture the arguments in a tuple and then use one of the solutions suggested here: "unpacking" a tuple to call a matching function pointer

auto pack(T... t)
{
    return [args=make_tuple(std::move(t)...)](auto&& f){
               // find a way to call f with args
           };
};

EDIT:

It's now voted into C++20, made by this proposal. Although the syntax is a bit different:

template<class... T>
auto pack(T... t)
{
    return [...t=std::move(t)](auto&& f){f(t...);};
};

Note that the ... is before the init-capture.

  • 1
    "An init-capture followed by an ellipsis is ill-formed", so the draft author is aware of this possible usage and doesn't want to support it? hmm... – Jamboree Jul 18 '14 at 10:15
  • @Jamboree I suppose so. Maybe there are some technical issues that would make it hard to support, or maybe whoever submitted the proposal for init-captures wanted to keep it simple. – Brian Jul 18 '14 at 16:45
  • 3
    @Jamboree Here's a discussion: groups.google.com/a/isocpp.org/forum/#!topic/std-discussion/… – Brian Jul 18 '14 at 16:47
  • 1
    " // find a way to call f with args", in C++17 you can use std::apply for that, so this problem can be solved by: 1) capturing into a tuple as you propose, 2) writing a variadic lambda with the code you want to execute, 3) std::apply the tuple on the lambda. – gnzlbg Feb 2 '16 at 9:02

As a follow-up, I came to this workaround:

template<class T>
struct mover
{
    mover(T const& val) : val(val) {}

    mover(T&& val) : val(std::move(val)) {}

    mover(mover const& other) = default;

    mover(mover&& other) = default; 

    mover(mover& other) : val(std::move(other.val)) {}

    operator T const&() const
    {
        return val; 
    }

    T val;
};

template<class T>
using wrap_t = typename std::conditional
    <
        std::is_move_constructible<T>::value
    && !std::is_trivially_copy_constructible<T>::value
      , mover<T>
      , T
    >::type;

template<class... Ts>
auto pack_impl(wrap_t<Ts>... ts)
{
    return [=](auto&& f)->decltype(auto)
    {
        return f(static_cast<Ts const&>(ts)...);
    };
}

auto pack = [](auto&&... ts)
{
    return pack_impl<std::decay_t<decltype(ts)>...>(static_cast<decltype(ts)>(ts)...);
};

It utilizes mover as a proxy, which allows lambda to capture it by move (it's a bit hacky). And wrap_t decides when is needed or beneficial to apply mover.

Now we can test it:

struct A
{
    A() = default;

    A(A&&)
    {
        std::cout << "move\n";
    }

    A(A const&)
    {
        std::cout << "copy\n";
    }
};

A a;
std::cout <<"p1------------\n";
auto p1 = pack(std::move(a));
std::cout <<"p2------------\n";
auto p2 = std::move(p1);
std::cout <<"p3------------\n";
auto p3 = p2;

Will print:

p1------------
move
move
p2------------
move
p3------------
copy

This expands on my comment to Brian answer above. In C++14 with the library fundamentals TS you can:

template<class... T>
auto pack(T... t)
{
    return [ts = std::make_tuple(std::move(t)...)](auto&& f){
        std::experimental::apply(f, ts);
    };
};

Supposing you want to generically capture a parameter pack by move and use it within a lambda you can write the code in a lambda within a lambda, and then apply the arguments on it:

[ts = std::make_tuple(std::move(t)...)](/* args */){
    auto lambda = [&](auto&&... args) {
      // - args is the original parameter pack that one wanted to 
      //   capture by move
      // - the other arguments can be used by reference
    };
    return std::experimental::apply(lambda, ts);
};

Your Answer

 

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.